Green Pea Pasta

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Introduction: Green Pea Pasta

You might have been wondering what else you could use to replace wheat flour and semolina when graving some Pasta fresca...
So have I.

And I found that flour from pulses like green peas works just fine.
If you happen to have a powerful blender, the sky is your limit ;)
...And making your own flour from pulses like dried green peas, chickpeas, lentils, beans, etc. has one big advantage when preparing pasta dough with it:
You're able to get a coarser grade of flour which is closer to semolina and preferable for Pasta.

I used store-bought green pea flour though and this also worked fine, so lets get started!


Step 1: Ingredients

  • 2 cups green pea flour
  • 1 cup rice flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 dash olive oil
  • 50 ml water
  • 1/2 ts salt
  • nutmeg

Step 2: Making the Dough

mix the pea and rice flour well before adding a dash of olive oil, some grated nutmeg, 1/2 tablespoon salt, 2 eggs and 50 ml water. Combine and mix with your hands. When you start working the dough you will notice that it's a lot stickier than ordinary pasta dough. You might have to add some more rice flour to get a smoother dough that is easier to work and less sticky.

Step 3: Put to Rest

When your dough is smooth & ready, form a ball and put it in the refrigerator for at least half an hour (longer is better).

If you're tempted to taste the raw dough you will notice that it has a very strong flavour that you might be familiar with from other raw pulses like chickpeas. It will be gone wih the pasta being cooked.

Step 4: Getting the Dough Ready

Once out of the refrigerator, cut the dough in slices about 1/2 inch thick. Make sure you put flour (rice) on each side before rolling the dough flat.

Of course a Pasta machine helps... a lot! ;)

I never go down to step 1 on the machine but with this pasta i actually choose 3 to be the last step.
In between the steps (i went from 7 straight to 3) i had to flour the dough again, thats how sticky it is when working with pea flour.

Step 5: Making the Pasta

Making the Pasta actually means cutting it to your favourite size/type.
Flouring the cut pasta in a strainer in between cutting the sheets helps to prevent the cut edges stick to one another when stored before cooking.

Step 6: Cook

To cook your Pasta just do the usual thing:
Bring 1 1/2 l salted water to the boil and add the pasta. The water should stop boiling by that time and stay right below that point for the pasta to cook gently until done.

Step 7: Finito! ...well Almost

Step 8: ...Think of Your Favorite Pasta Dish

Prepare your green Pasta fresca the way you would do with any other kind of pasta.

I love to fry Onion and Garlic in olive Oil, pour some wine before adding my pasta and then stir in 1 tbls mustard along with 2 tbls creamcheese. Finish it off with some limejuice, fresh rocket and cut tomatoes, and voila:

Step 9: Enjoy!

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    user

    We have a be nice policy.
    Please be positive and constructive.

    Tips

    Don't take 2 full eggs, take 1 egg and 1 yolk.

    Questions

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    Is this Gluten Free ?

    12 Comments

    Looks amazing! I’ve casted my vote. Very nice Instructable.

    user

    Looks delicious! What brand of pasta maker do you use? Do you have a particular size of machine you use and what type of attachments do you recommend? I've been looking for one, because my last one broke... There's so many out there on Amazon, etc. Thanks again!

    3 replies

    Thank you, It is really tasty too!
    Sorry for your loss (the pasta machine ;)
    I am actually using a noname machine that i was given by a friend. Works alright though. The width that can be rolled is a maximum of 15 cm. So its really a smaller sized pasta machine. A bigger one is helpful when your baking a lot of pizzas, pasta machines work great for flattening pizza dough!
    For attachements its really up to your favourite sort of pasta. Mine is Tagliatelle!
    ...If you want to do filled Pasta (e.g. Ravioli) with an attachment you should go for a better pasta maker though, cheaper noname models are very limited in that concern.

    user

    Thank you for your quick response and information! I'm planning on Green Pea pasta tomorrow night (roll, slice to size, unroll and dry)!

    *Ups. I replied with the account of my partner

    Fascinating. I'll have to try it. Have you experimented with egg substitutes using this recipe?

    2 replies

    I have looked into this and found out the following:
    'Poor mans pasta' is without egg. Semolina and Water only.
    If you use egg though you cannot use only semolina, that would be too sticky. Thats why in a ordinary dough for pasta fresca you put egg semolina and flour.
    The opposite: if you use water only, you have to use semolina, otherwise the pasta is too gooey.

    Maybe there's no need to substitute the egg at all! just use water and a grainier, semolina-like peaflour instead. I will totally try a glutenfree, no-egg pasta with that corn semolina on my shelf :)

    Thank you.

    Sorry but i don´t know if its work with egg substitutes

    Good luck

    This looks so cool. I've always wanted to make pasta this makes me want to even more. Just becuse of the colour!

    1 reply

    Thank you! I was actually really surprised by the color :) didnt think it'd be that green
    (because the flour itself isn't as green as the cooked pasta)

    I look forward to trying this.
    I have a question though.
    For the rice flour, can that be made the same way the lentil flour is made.....bunch of rice in a blender? And if so, can we use brown rice instead of white?

    1 reply

    making your rice flour in the blender works if the machine is very powerful. Brown rice should be fine I'd like to see that result! I tried riceflour before with my Thermomix -> flour was a bit coarser. But if you get a semolina-like grain its probably even better for an al dente pasta! (If the flour you are using is too fine textured, this will result in a gooey pasta)