author
6Instructables40,667Views30CommentsFloridaJoined June 3rd, 2012
Greetings from my laboratory! I am usually out here working on projects and solving problems. Sometimes for the profit, often for the challenge, but always for the love... and I absolutely love this s***! The future is right now. We are surrounded by inexpensive machines that give us more ability to create than ever before. This ability coupled with our vast networks of communication pave way to a near future that sci-fi writers would envy!..... But! There will be many problems to solve, ma... Read More »

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  • HydeTheJekyll commented on jprussack's instructable A-Frame Chicken Coop: Redux3 days ago
    A-Frame Chicken Coop: Redux

    Your very welcome! If you have any questions about 3d Printing, or want me to make a particular tutorial, don't hesitate to let me know.

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  • Vacuum Slow Cooker Filament Restoration

    I will be posting a 2.0 shortly. Not only will it feature many of the improvements suggested by users, It will also included quantified data!

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  • HydeTheJekyll's instructable TinkerCAD - Piranha Planter's weekly stats: 4 days ago
    • TinkerCAD - Piranha Planter
      799 views
      4 favorites
      10 comments
  • HydeTheJekyll commented on jprussack's instructable A-Frame Chicken Coop: Redux7 days ago
    A-Frame Chicken Coop: Redux

    Thank you for being you and posting a great instuctable! I love that so many people are implementing a Donation-based Business Model. For people like us it's perfect, we build and spend money on the things we like regardless. The knowledge we gain and share doesn't cost us much anymore but it still has value. If we only charge for our information, we limit the amount of people that can benefit from said information. So, the best thing to do is give away as much of it as we can, and allow people to pay as they feel comfortable! I don't need a coop right now, and If I build one, I would probably design it myself. However, I wanted to show you some support... so I bought it :) Have a Happy Fathers day and keep being awesome!

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  • HydeTheJekyll's instructable TinkerCAD - Peg Board Planter's weekly stats: 7 days ago
    • TinkerCAD - Peg Board Planter
      1,947 views
      22 favorites
      4 comments
  • HydeTheJekyll commented on HydeTheJekyll's instructable TinkerCAD - Peg Board Planter8 days ago
    TinkerCAD - Peg Board Planter

    I will gladly help you out. Both the Taz 6 and the Mini are great printers, one of my clients has a Taz and it has proven very dependable. If you want a Mini however, Check out the Mini 2 first. It's on pre-order right now, it comes out in 5 days(Jan 20). Lulz really went all in on this one. It features several major improvements like - 20% more build(still less than the Taz though), a belt driven z-axis, and some seriously quite stepper motors. But you really want to ask yourself what you need in a printer. Dependability is important to us all, but it's VERY important in a commercial environment. If my home printer goes down, its a PITA but it is not a major deal. However, if my prototyping printer goes down at the wrong time. I could miss an important deadline, and that could easily...

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    I will gladly help you out. Both the Taz 6 and the Mini are great printers, one of my clients has a Taz and it has proven very dependable. If you want a Mini however, Check out the Mini 2 first. It's on pre-order right now, it comes out in 5 days(Jan 20). Lulz really went all in on this one. It features several major improvements like - 20% more build(still less than the Taz though), a belt driven z-axis, and some seriously quite stepper motors. But you really want to ask yourself what you need in a printer. Dependability is important to us all, but it's VERY important in a commercial environment. If my home printer goes down, its a PITA but it is not a major deal. However, if my prototyping printer goes down at the wrong time. I could miss an important deadline, and that could easily cost me a valuable relationship depending on circumstances. If a client is depending on me to deliver on time and I don't, they will probably not use me in the future(and that could cost me many times the cost of any 3d Printer) Bottom line with Lulz, they are more expensive than other comparable printers BUT that difference in price allows for high quality parts; tight quality control, plenty of R&D, and consequently, reliability even in a commercial environment. If that's what you need or want, Lulz is a great option. If you are trying to spend less money and what me to provide insights on cheaper printers just let me know :)About the printer I used to make this: For this print, I used PLA and my fastest printer, hence the excessive z banding noticed in the pictures. Which, just so happens to be one of the cheapest i3 clones you can find and the first printer I bought. I must mention, If I were to factor in my time it is not so cheap. I spent a few hundred on printer+upgrades, but I spent a couple thousand dollars worth of time getting it to this point. For me it was worth it because I wanted to know everything about how 3d Printers work and this option required me to do a lot of research (I can't recommend this option unless I know someone well. It is defiantly not for everyone). As far as the blog you linked: I read through most of it and it seems to be a proper and accurate article. If you use that site often and want to help out the people that write the articles you read, use their link. They will earn a small commission and that helps people like us afford to spend more time on things like this. That really comes down to what people and businesses you want to support. Conversely, If you use one of the links I posted in the start of this reply, I would get a small commission. Do not feel any obligation to me, I love doing this regardless. I've worked hard over the years and I am comfortable. In my case, I have a deep passion for engineering and have been in the prototyping industry for a few years. However, I have spent most of my time making things that other people wanted and its gotten a little boring. So, a few weeks ago I decided to start building more of the things I want to make and sharing them on the web. I couldn't be happier about it! 3D printing feels brand new again, and I find myself in the lab happily pulling 12+ hour days. All in all I hope I was able to provide you with the answers you are looking for, feel free to ask me any question, any time, cheers :)

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  • HydeTheJekyll commented on tayken by design's instructable Tortoise Terrarium9 days ago
    Tortoise Terrarium

    What a beautiful and diverse collection of succulents in one planter, I love the variety!

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  • HydeTheJekyll commented on HydeTheJekyll's instructable TinkerCAD - Peg Board Planter9 days ago
    TinkerCAD - Peg Board Planter

    Wow, thank you very much. I'm gla you enjoed it :)

    Infill - 35%. Higher infill increases part strength (how much force something takes until it breaks. But, after 50% the returns start to diminish (More filament, but less and less increased strength). Lower infill typically allows for more deflection ( how much something will bend before it breaks) layer height: .02 - Has an affect on part strength, but it is more a consequence of layer adhesion (many factors affect layer adhesion, stepper motors, lead screw specifications, print media and printing temperatures.Sidewall thickness - 1 - changing this can greatly affect characteristics of a printed part. Thick sides with less infill can increase strength whilst maintain flexibility. Generally speaking, increasing sidewall thickness will increase strength.However, in this case it may be m...

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    Infill - 35%. Higher infill increases part strength (how much force something takes until it breaks. But, after 50% the returns start to diminish (More filament, but less and less increased strength). Lower infill typically allows for more deflection ( how much something will bend before it breaks) layer height: .02 - Has an affect on part strength, but it is more a consequence of layer adhesion (many factors affect layer adhesion, stepper motors, lead screw specifications, print media and printing temperatures.Sidewall thickness - 1 - changing this can greatly affect characteristics of a printed part. Thick sides with less infill can increase strength whilst maintain flexibility. Generally speaking, increasing sidewall thickness will increase strength.However, in this case it may be more related to the angle of the bend. I do not feel any stress when I insert or remove the planter. The angle I used was 135D and the part slides right in. If you already broke off your pegs I suggest doing this:Open up tinkerCAD and make a pipe with a bend of 135 degrees. On one side of the bend have 5-7mm of pipe (this depends on your pegboard) and on the other side of the bend, have 5-10mm of pipe. Make sure to set the thickness all the way up to insure it is a solid part. Print two of these little bendy pipes. Now, take the planter and sand/cut the broken pegs flush with the back of the planter. If you used ABS, add a drop or two of acetone to the new peg and place it on the planter, hold it there for a few moments and slightly "twist" back and forth. It will start to feel like it is becoming glued on. If you printed with PLA you can use MEK (You do not want to breath it in, care must be taken as it is a VOC). Some Pipe Cleaners contain MEK. Alternately, a strong glue should hold it. Further still, you could use a technique called Friction Welding to firmly adhere the pegs. Briefly, you would place a 20-30mm piece of the filament inside a Dremel. Turn it on to a relatively high speed(10k-20k) and basically "weld" the parts together in a similar fashion to using a MiG welder.Hope this helps you out :)

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  • HydeTheJekyll commented on HydeTheJekyll's instructable TinkerCAD - Piranha Planter10 days ago
    TinkerCAD - Piranha Planter

    I would love to see it! Send my a picture even if you don't upload it. Also, I'm sorry for accedentaly stealing your thunder :(

    Thank you for such important tips! I gave special thanks to you and added this information to the instuctable

    Of course :) Let me figure the best way to share it. Make sure to scale it to fit your needs - I made it small so it wouldn't take up a ton of desk space.

    I set it to public in TinkerCAD. I set the Piranha plant on its side next to the planter when printing. https://www.tinkercad.com/things/eIJuDIGZoXS

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  • HydeTheJekyll commented on HydeTheJekyll's instructable TinkerCAD - Piranha Planter11 days ago
    TinkerCAD - Piranha Planter

    Thank you very much :)

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  • HydeTheJekyll's instructable Vacuum Slow Cooker Filament Restoration's weekly stats: 19 days ago
    • Vacuum Slow Cooker Filament Restoration
      7,260 views
      74 favorites
      18 comments
  • Vacuum Slow Cooker Filament Restoration

    This is one of the reasons the vacuum is such an important part of the process. Other than allowing for more efficient evaporation; a vacuum allows for this evaporation to take place on almost all of the filaments surface, as the filament is not wound tightly enough to completely prevent the movement of air.

    Yes, somehow you would have to install a suitable nipple or valve for which to connect the vacuum pump. Care would have to be taken to ensure that it is capable of achieving the required amount of vacuum. However, pressure cookers experience fairly high amounts of pressure during intended operation. I would strongly advise that you never attempt to use the pressure cooker for anything other than drying filament if you decide to make these modifications.

    Yes, and most of us store our filament like this. I would even consider myself one of them lol. However, as I live in a tropical climate, I find that all of my filament performs worse as time goes on. Regardless of how much care I take,there are short periods of time when my filament is exposed to pretty high amounts of humidity.

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  • Vacuum Slow Cooker Filament Restoration

    Thank you, I'm glad you enjoyed it! If you live in a humid environment like myself, it will be very helpful.

    That depends on a lot of specific factors. I take pretty good care of my filament. Likewise, an hour is usually good. I suggest you play around with it; dry it for an hour, than print a test. You could always put it in for more/less time as you feel the need. The cool thing about this method is exactly that, cool temperatures. With temperature below 150F, there is much less risk of deformation.

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