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20Instructables90,969Views213CommentsDesert Aire, Eastern Washington Joined August 17th, 2009

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  • KellyCraig commented on fghuertas's instructable Gouge, How to Make3 weeks ago
    Gouge, How to Make

    When I was polishing colored Plexiglass/Lexon disks cut out with my hole saw, using the square one cut the time I spent to a fraction of the time. Generally, the results did not require further sanding and polishing.I polish about ten disks at a time by fitting them over a carriage bolt the size of the pilot hole and clamping them with a nut, leaving enough bolt to go into the lathe. I use the live center on the opposite end.My 1"x48" belt sander touches the carbide up with just a quick touch on a 220 belt.

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  • What a nice way to say "[g]et off your butt and get back to what you enjoy doing." ThanksI do understand the concept of unexpected "fame." A week or two ago I found myself being photographed for a national publication, more by accident than for talent. The reason for that photo is out of a new interest and a unique application of an old process.In truth, I'll continue sharing, but reserve the right share frustration, even if it does bring out the occasional troll. ;)

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  • Thanks for the tip. From it, there appears a pattern to suggestions regarding my ibles - I need to place more focus on photos and/or crank up their quality.Unfortunately, many ibles I wrote were after the fact. For example, I have a unique cart build, but already had too many carts. However, fortune arrived and a shiny thing took me down another path - metal plating and metal forming. Because of that, I was able to dedicate an existing cart to building a station (ible #21) on which to plate and form (ible #22) and build a smaller one (ible #23) for my planer. I will make an effort to work my camera a little harder.

    Thanks for the tip. From it, there appears to be a pattern forming with regard to suggestions - I need to place more effort on photos and/or crank up their quality.Unfortunately, many ibles I wrote were after the fact. The project had already been done before I thought to share it. For example, I have a unique cart build, but already had too many carts. Fortunately, I get another shot at that ible, since a shiny thing took me down a path, which required me to build another, to replace one I stole from my planer (which was too big for it anyway)Because of that shiny thing (metalplating and metalforming), I was able to dedicate the planer cart to building a plating/forming station (ible #21) and build a smaller one for my planer (ible #22). Then I'll do on on the plating and form...

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    Thanks for the tip. From it, there appears to be a pattern forming with regard to suggestions - I need to place more effort on photos and/or crank up their quality.Unfortunately, many ibles I wrote were after the fact. The project had already been done before I thought to share it. For example, I have a unique cart build, but already had too many carts. Fortunately, I get another shot at that ible, since a shiny thing took me down a path, which required me to build another, to replace one I stole from my planer (which was too big for it anyway)Because of that shiny thing (metalplating and metalforming), I was able to dedicate the planer cart to building a plating/forming station (ible #21) and build a smaller one for my planer (ible #22). Then I'll do on on the plating and forming (ible #23)I will make an effort to ask myself if a project would be ible worthy, and to add and improve my photos.

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  • Thanks for the tip, Josehf. I, certainly, will look into that.

    I take it your two hundred thirty-four unpublished instructables are like my meager twenty or so and floating in a drafts folder until a time when you aren't knee deep in remodeling projects, granite shaping and forming, electroforming and plating, woodworking, working a bit of electrical for the shop, playing with some electronics ideas, . . . . etc.So, yeah, I know what you mean. My shop and life is full of "could be instructables," but those will have to wait to even become rough drafts, for obvious reasons.

    It started with just sharing, Yonatan24. It still is, but the joking about fifteen minutes of fame is a bit Freudian (i.e., there is a ring of truth). Though I type well, I enjoy typing only because I enjoy trying to take something complex and put it into words those with little or no experience in the area could understand well enough to do or build the thing the instructable covered.At the same time, I might be a little burned out on writing, since I cannot guess at how many reams of paper it would take to print out what I've written, professionally and not.A few of my instructables have a few hours into them, but most are written and re-written in attempt to make them clear to someone who never dealt with certain tools. Others presume at least a rudimentary knowledge of, for example,...

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    It started with just sharing, Yonatan24. It still is, but the joking about fifteen minutes of fame is a bit Freudian (i.e., there is a ring of truth). Though I type well, I enjoy typing only because I enjoy trying to take something complex and put it into words those with little or no experience in the area could understand well enough to do or build the thing the instructable covered.At the same time, I might be a little burned out on writing, since I cannot guess at how many reams of paper it would take to print out what I've written, professionally and not.A few of my instructables have a few hours into them, but most are written and re-written in attempt to make them clear to someone who never dealt with certain tools. Others presume at least a rudimentary knowledge of, for example, running an over-arm pin router.Of course, it remains you are right.

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  • You bring some good points, Downunder35m.I have instructables I've been working on for a year. They contain pages of information because I know what it was like to start with woodwork, glass etch, electroplating/electroforming, remodeling, auto repair and so on.In all, some instructables could represent a month or more of work. Knowing you could enter it in a future contest [one time] very well could inspire one to speed up the process and move on to the next ible.I, often, go back and polish instructables I published previously to correct grammar, spelling, or to clarify a process. I do this even knowing I won't get a thousand more hits, make the featured list, or be chosen in a contest. I would continue to do that even if the rules change. However, the excitement of possibly becomin...

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    You bring some good points, Downunder35m.I have instructables I've been working on for a year. They contain pages of information because I know what it was like to start with woodwork, glass etch, electroplating/electroforming, remodeling, auto repair and so on.In all, some instructables could represent a month or more of work. Knowing you could enter it in a future contest [one time] very well could inspire one to speed up the process and move on to the next ible.I, often, go back and polish instructables I published previously to correct grammar, spelling, or to clarify a process. I do this even knowing I won't get a thousand more hits, make the featured list, or be chosen in a contest. I would continue to do that even if the rules change. However, the excitement of possibly becoming famous for two more minutes might compromise time spent on that.

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  • Yep, that's why I only have fourteen minutes and fifty-nine seconds to go - I've had six featured and came in a runner-up on a contest. Yes, it is a good feeling. Those things aside, I don't know what stood that six out, because my table saw set up guide and my Combination Set up Guide (blah blah) are the kinds of tools those of us who've worked wood for decades would have sold one of the kids for.In the end, it I and others post here because we like to share ideas, but we also like the mentioned perks of being featured and the idea of winning a contest. After all, instructables' does these things for a reason.

    Downunder35m, interesting tips and conclusions. I love the irony. Was it on purpose?Inasmuch as you indicate merely including humor in any post is a basis for moving the entire post to an entirely new section, would not your post be better posted elsewhere, such as under writing tips or something?Though I've posted twenty instructables, I've only entered one or two contests. As such, your inference I post instructables solely to enter contests is erroneous.As to contests, what do you think their purpose is? I'm thinking it's a safe bet they were incorporated into the site because many people enjoy a chance at winning a spot. The point of my post remains that I would like to see it made possible to enter [never before entered] ibles in a relative contest.

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  • Well, there you have it. I should just leave because I'm a self serving doo doo head?Before I leave:1) Can you point me to the official instructables page that lays out what you just posted? I'd, especially, be interested in the page that discusses how I must or should adhere to some altruistic [or similar] standard and give up a little or all of what I invented, designed or learned. 2) What did you think of my posts (instructables), prior to you making your comment?3) What is your background, in relation to them, including the ones posted or in the future that are actually patentable?Finally, I guess I could say you missed the tongue in cheek fifteen minutes of fame (with fourteen minutes and fifty-nine seconds to go) statement. Too, you appeared to have glossed over the fact my pos...

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    Well, there you have it. I should just leave because I'm a self serving doo doo head?Before I leave:1) Can you point me to the official instructables page that lays out what you just posted? I'd, especially, be interested in the page that discusses how I must or should adhere to some altruistic [or similar] standard and give up a little or all of what I invented, designed or learned. 2) What did you think of my posts (instructables), prior to you making your comment?3) What is your background, in relation to them, including the ones posted or in the future that are actually patentable?Finally, I guess I could say you missed the tongue in cheek fifteen minutes of fame (with fourteen minutes and fifty-nine seconds to go) statement. Too, you appeared to have glossed over the fact my post was a thinly veiled request the many things I post, including those that already met your demands/expectations be allowed for consideration.

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  • KellyCraig commented on barefootbohemian's instructable Drilling Glass1 month ago
    Drilling Glass

    Thanks the short and simple directions. From them one can take key points that will make you a pro (okay, that might be an exaggeration): 1) Keep the tip wet to keep the tip cool (the simple shop towel tip was gold); and,2) Let the drill do the work (BE PATIENT) and DO NOT press hard.I set my big tile saw up with a three pound coffee can hanging off a cord tied to the back of the moving sled. I drop a few rocks in it and it goes slower than I tend to push. The weight of a drill or Dremel might do the same, if [controlled and] allowed to push through on its own.

    As I read further, this reminded me of my tile saw trick (coffee can with weight hanging off the back). Great tip.

    I have a pint of hydroflouric acid and it scares me even more than my big saws and things. Definitely a thing needing great respect.

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  • Perhaps something that mixes art mediums. For example:- Stained, leaded or blown glass and woodwork.- Granite, slate or marble and woodwork- Stained, leaded or blown glass and plastic or acrylic- Brass, iron, copper, zinc, pewter, silver or gold and natural stones- Brass, iron, copper, zinc, pewter, silver or gold and woodwork- Plaster and woodor - a clock and wood, metal or plastic to create art- a second hand store item and _______ to create art

    An alternate use contest. For example, alternate uses for:- appliances- tools- household items - everyday items (e.g., scissors, mirrors, candles. . . . )-

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  • KellyCraig commented on simplerandom's instructable DIY Ligthbox / Light Table2 months ago
    DIY Ligthbox / Light Table

    What on earth is organic glass?You can also consider using plastic from a dead video monitor. They use nice 1/4" thick acrylic.You'll have to sand it to create a surface that will diffuse the light. Mine uses a power supply and dimmer (12 volt dimmer on the output of the xformer). That way, the light can be powered and controlled, but won't have the increased bulk and weight of a switch, and there isn't a dark spot, if the power supply and switch have to be mounted in the box.Just be sure the power supply can handle the wattage of the LED's you use.

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  • 10 MORE Woodworking Tricks the Pros Use

    Add to the tips, do not wast money on flint or even garnet sandpaper. They dull quickly. Instead, buy aluminum oxide paper.Too, if possible remove the dust as it comes off and it will greatly increase the life and effectiveness of the paper.

    Try bar soap instead. Less messy.

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  • Home Carbonation System for Water, Beer, and More

    Love the edit feature [end the "no I don't font].

    I've thought about a slowed down version of a paint shaker, as I stand out in my shop shaking bottles.I, also, am use the plastic carba caps for charging and they work fine. Of course, I just re-install the stock cheap caps for storing charged bottles (need to remember to keep them, since they fit over a woodworking F clamp.

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  • Home Carbonation System for Water, Beer, and More

    I didn't worry much about swapping tanks, since I picked mine up, with gauges and an aquarium injector, for five bucks. It might be more to get the same tank back, and I might have to wait, or come back on another day.I'm of old fart status ("they" say), but the tank poses no problem for me or the car. I do try to secure it well, if only because it would make an impressive missile. I know I'm guaranteed 500 charges, but it may be higher (e.g., 700).

    I've been using my system for two or three years now and it, certainly, stomps all over a Soda Stream, which we had, but found to be expensive and too limited in both capacity and uses.I use a 20# tank and I can either swap or refill my tank at the "local" gas supply house about an hour away (we have to travel for shopping anyway). Swaps run me $11.00.I discussed the food quality issue with the supplier and they supply medical grade an welding grade from the same supply._______________________________I'll have to give the double charge a try. I charge at around 45 psi. Thanks for sharing the experiment.I have very good luck storing my bottles. I buy two liter charged water bottles and just swap them out. At about a buck a bottle, I swap them a couple times a year (6ea) and ...

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    I've been using my system for two or three years now and it, certainly, stomps all over a Soda Stream, which we had, but found to be expensive and too limited in both capacity and uses.I use a 20# tank and I can either swap or refill my tank at the "local" gas supply house about an hour away (we have to travel for shopping anyway). Swaps run me $11.00.I discussed the food quality issue with the supplier and they supply medical grade an welding grade from the same supply._______________________________I'll have to give the double charge a try. I charge at around 45 psi. Thanks for sharing the experiment.I have very good luck storing my bottles. I buy two liter charged water bottles and just swap them out. At about a buck a bottle, I swap them a couple times a year (6ea) and I'm still saving hundreds over Soda Stream.Of course, as you point out, I can "sparkle" apple juice or cider, wine or whatever too.Thanks

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  • KellyCraig commented on bravoechonovember1's instructable In-drawer Knife Organizer5 months ago
    In-drawer Knife Organizer

    Mine looked exactly like yours. Now, they are display worthy, as, I suspect, yours will be.I forgot to mention, you can run a search on the Net for "oil, bees wax wood treatments" and find formulas that will serve you till you are old and gray.

    Rub some mineral oil on those knife blades and you'll be amazed how beautiful the wood is. Mix in some bee's wax and Carnuba wax and you have a down town finish. Another plus of the mineral oil is, those cracks may disappear, as the moisture lost from years of drying is replaced with oil.A small bottle of mineral oil only runs a couple bucks.

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  • KellyCraig commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Magnetic Knife Rack7 months ago
    Magnetic Knife Rack

    In addition to a really nice knife rack, you've supported my contention scraps are a myth.;)

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  • KellyCraig commented on KellyCraig's instructable Making a Turned-Off-Center Door Stop7 months ago
    Making a Turned-Off-Center Door Stop

    I test drove this using some 2x4's I found laying around the shop and the results were nearly as pleasing as with 2x6's. I added the pictures to provide examples.

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  • KellyCraig commented on AroundHome's instructable Milling Short Logs on the Bandsaw7 months ago
    Milling Short Logs on the Bandsaw

    One of the steps is easier than you think (meanwhile, back at the ranch, nice video): https://www.instructables.com/id/Band-Saw-Log-Sled/

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  • KellyCraig commented on Kozmicblues69's instructable Level Bracelets8 months ago
    Level Bracelets

    In the near future, I'll be posting a jig I designed for doing this kind of project. It was designed and built to overcome problems my wife was having doing this kind of work. You might look into it, if you do much of this sort of thing.

    Too fun. My wife dabbles in jewelry and now I know what to do with those old vials that, often, slip out of try-squares and such [and were, otherwise] worthless anyway.Thanks

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  • KellyCraig's instructable Lawn Vacuum System Using Woodshop Equipment's weekly stats: 8 months ago
    • Lawn Vacuum System Using Woodshop Equipment
      5,144 views
      45 favorites
      8 comments
    • FOR THE SHOP: SIMPLE, EASY ACCESS, CEILING HUNG RAG STORAGE
      68 views
      0 favorites
      0 comments
  • KellyCraig commented on dave5201's instructable How to Hide a Wall Wart Transformer8 months ago
    How to Hide a Wall Wart Transformer

    That is not entirely true. If it were, people would be required to tear out walls to add a ground line, when swapping a dangerously worn outlet.

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  • Lawn Vacuum System Using Woodshop Equipment

    I had to run my Bosch for a year, while I waited to get 240 to my cabinet saw. A couple years down the road, it was Groundhog's day, all over again. I spend a lot of years just vacuuming up after the fact and making do. My first big jump in the dust collection world was just installing a couple squirrel cages that allowed me to fire up the leaf blower and clean shop. [Did that during the day once, then pulled the garage door up and discovered I'd just dusted the entire neighborhood, so only did it after dark, after that . ;) ]Today, I have that 240 and the Bosch went the way of craigslist. Today, I have three collectors [even though it's not really that big a shop. Those collectors tend some nice toys, uh, tools (e.g., 8", spiral, long bed jointer, over-arm pin router, a ...

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    I had to run my Bosch for a year, while I waited to get 240 to my cabinet saw. A couple years down the road, it was Groundhog's day, all over again. I spend a lot of years just vacuuming up after the fact and making do. My first big jump in the dust collection world was just installing a couple squirrel cages that allowed me to fire up the leaf blower and clean shop. [Did that during the day once, then pulled the garage door up and discovered I'd just dusted the entire neighborhood, so only did it after dark, after that . ;) ]Today, I have that 240 and the Bosch went the way of craigslist. Today, I have three collectors [even though it's not really that big a shop. Those collectors tend some nice toys, uh, tools (e.g., 8", spiral, long bed jointer, over-arm pin router, a router carving machine, etc.). Regarding all that, it should be noted, I'm sixty-six, and those things didn't appear over night. My passion for fabricating saw dust filled my shop with tools and equipment, as opportunity and need arose. I upgraded them when I could. There are still a few tools I want (okay, that never ends), but I remember [when not wanting that wide bed sander] to appreciate the fact I have a hobby shop many professionals would be happy with.I still build many things, both because I want the money to go to something else and because it just doesn't exist. I still make do with some tools too.The point of this is, take time to look at what you've accomplished. Too, remember, if you lost it all, you could replace it in far less time than it took you to build the first collection. I know this, first hand. My first Unisaw took me fifteen years to acquire. The second, and many times the equipment I had then, took three years.The short of it is, if you want it and give it your passion, you'll have it. If you doubt it, go back to taking time to really think about what you've already accomplished.

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  • Lawn Vacuum System Using Woodshop Equipment

    Finally, a common sense approach. Golf course is only a few blocks away, so it's going to take a bit more cooperation.

    That's a great idea. Just a reminder, the idea of the cyclone and dust collector is so you can vacuum without concern about rocks running through the impellers, since they spin out before getting to the collector or leaf vac.

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  • Lawn Vacuum System Using Woodshop Equipment

    And building this system [very much] justifies the Super Dust Deputy too. The philosophy which smacks of an event involving my wife about four decades back. I bought a trailer from a guy and, in the course of visiting with him, I learned he did glass etch. I found that interesting and we ended up talking about it in detail. Eventually, he suggested I borrow his air compressor for a few weeks and do some etches the wife would like, then point out I could do more, if I had a compressor too. I got my compressor a few weeks later.I cannot say enough good about cyclone pre-filters. My purchase of a three horse Oneida Gorilla Cyclone was inspired by the performance I experienced with one of the small Dust Deputies for vacuums. Before getting it, vacuuming sheetrock dust would clog the ...

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    And building this system [very much] justifies the Super Dust Deputy too. The philosophy which smacks of an event involving my wife about four decades back. I bought a trailer from a guy and, in the course of visiting with him, I learned he did glass etch. I found that interesting and we ended up talking about it in detail. Eventually, he suggested I borrow his air compressor for a few weeks and do some etches the wife would like, then point out I could do more, if I had a compressor too. I got my compressor a few weeks later.I cannot say enough good about cyclone pre-filters. My purchase of a three horse Oneida Gorilla Cyclone was inspired by the performance I experienced with one of the small Dust Deputies for vacuums. Before getting it, vacuuming sheetrock dust would clog the vacuum filters in five minutes or less. After it, I could get up to a half hour of run time.

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  • KellyCraig commented on pardy73's instructable Edge Lit Acrylic Sign9 months ago
    Edge Lit Acrylic Sign

    Back before lasers were available to the public, that's how we etched our plexi type products. I've done several projects this way and it's easy just using a cheap siphon feed blaster. I run at about forty-five pounds and just use good contact paper for my reist.

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  • KellyCraig's instructable ADJUSTABLE, CEILING MOUNT EYE GLASS STORAGE's weekly stats: 9 months ago
    • ADJUSTABLE, CEILING MOUNT EYE GLASS STORAGE
      636 views
      14 favorites
      1 comments
  • KellyCraig's instructable Fold Up Rack for Coats, Cords and Other Storage's weekly stats: 9 months ago
    • Fold Up Rack for Coats, Cords and Other Storage
      622 views
      11 favorites
      2 comments
  • Fold Up Rack for Coats, Cords and Other Storage

    Sadly, I only thought about publishing after the fact, which is a pattern I trying to overcome. It's hard though, since I get cornered by whims and most the things I do are not planed.Those things aside, I do plan on building a bigger version so I can capture the photos and update this ible. Anyway, thanks for the reminder.

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  • KellyCraig's entry SMALL PARTS HOLDING CLAMP is a winner in the Build a Tool Contest 2017 contest 9 months ago
  • KellyCraig's entry SMALL PARTS HOLDING CLAMP is a finalist in the Build a Tool Contest 2017 contest 10 months ago
  • KellyCraig commented on KellyCraig's instructable SMALL PARTS HOLDING CLAMP10 months ago
    SMALL PARTS HOLDING CLAMP

    I blew apart a small clamp today, while assembling it. Where the T-nut went down into the wood was not enlarged to accommodate that part and the pressure caused the ply to push apart. So I'll have to edit and add that caution.The good news is, the glue joint held fine.

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  • KellyCraig's instructable L-square Edge Stop - Depth Gauge - Set Up Gauge's weekly stats: 10 months ago
    • L-square Edge Stop - Depth Gauge - Set Up Gauge
      237 views
      1 favorites
      0 comments
  • KellyCraig commented on Moy perez woodshop's instructable Miter Saw Station Build10 months ago
    Miter Saw Station Build

    Mine was nowhere near as beautiful as this. It was just functional, and handy because of things like the stops.I would offer only one recommendation: Since this is one of those things that could easily be a generational hand-me-down, it's likely different miters would be used on it. For example, my first miter was a Delta. My next was a Dewalt and my current one is a Bosch. It is common for miters to have tables that are different heights, measuring from the surface they are mounted on. For this reason, consider:1) making the area where the miter will rest at least 3" lower;2) installing 2x pieces (e.g., about 4"x4") under each corner of the surface on which you intend to rest the miter;3) drill a hole large enough to drop at least a 1/2" bolt through (larger woul...

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    Mine was nowhere near as beautiful as this. It was just functional, and handy because of things like the stops.I would offer only one recommendation: Since this is one of those things that could easily be a generational hand-me-down, it's likely different miters would be used on it. For example, my first miter was a Delta. My next was a Dewalt and my current one is a Bosch. It is common for miters to have tables that are different heights, measuring from the surface they are mounted on. For this reason, consider:1) making the area where the miter will rest at least 3" lower;2) installing 2x pieces (e.g., about 4"x4") under each corner of the surface on which you intend to rest the miter;3) drill a hole large enough to drop at least a 1/2" bolt through (larger would be better, but that will do);4) cut the head off a six inch bolt and add four nuts and a washer - mount one nut flush with one end of the bolt and use the second bolt up against it to lock the first nut in place (this end goes up); - mount two nuts a few inches up the other end and follow them with a washer. This part drops down the holes and can be adjusted the [double nut] locked in place, allowing you to raise and lower the bolts. \ - lay a piece of ply on top and adjust for depth of your miter box.

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  • KellyCraig's instructable SMALL PARTS CLAMP's weekly stats: 10 months ago
    • SMALL PARTS CLAMP
      11,421 views
      89 favorites
      3 comments
  • KellyCraig followed Woodworking and Tools channel 10 months ago
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  • KellyCraig commented on KellyCraig's instructable Band Saw Log Sled11 months ago
    Band Saw Log Sled

    Thanks for the photos. This helps a lot. From them, it looks like a good solution too.

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  • KellyCraig's instructable Making a Turned-Off-Center Door Stop's weekly stats: 11 months ago
    • Making a Turned-Off-Center Door Stop
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      8 favorites
      2 comments
  • KellyCraig commented on KellyCraig's instructable Making a Turned-Off-Center Door Stop11 months ago
    Making a Turned-Off-Center Door Stop

    Aha! A book scoop. Right, Frank? ;)

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  • KellyCraig entered SMALL PARTS CLAMP in the Build a Tool Contest 2017 contest 11 months ago
  • KellyCraig commented on Phil B's instructable Really Good Pusher Stick11 months ago
    Really Good Pusher Stick

    I cannot emphasis enough what a great idea it is to use a "push shoe," rather than just push sticks.I have a cabinet saw (my second) and have owned at least six table saws. I started using push shoes decades ago, since I find push sticks to be pathetic attempts at safety (but better than nothing). Shoes, like Phil's, hold the wood down at the back of the blade, where the blade might lift the material and cause a dangerous kickback. Since using variations of these (and a splitter), I've only had a couple minor kickbacks over the decades.

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  • How to Clean Sandpaper on Powertools

    Now, go get that tube of silicone caulk you set aside and which hardened in your absence, cut the hardened caulk free and see what that does.

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  • KellyCraig commented on DouglasC10's instructable How to Drive Safely in a Snowstorm1 year ago
    How to Drive Safely in a Snowstorm

    My dad was State Highway foreman for the North Cross Highway when it opened. He had his men kick their pickups into neutral coming down the hill to deal with the engine pushing the rear tires as the front disk brakes locked up the front. They quit losing vehicles to the ditches.Of course, it's a good idea to be ready to pull the vehicle back into gear on a second's notice, to power out of a situation.

    I've made it off a mountain with a ninety degree turn at the bottom (a jeep and a station wagon failed to make the turn) by resorting to seemingly counter intuitive measures. On the way down the hill, the engine compression kept locking up the rear wheels. I had to go to higher gears as each lower gear locked the tires up. Braking threw the truck sideways, but helped a little. I'd keep braking (very lightly), go sideways, let off, straighten up and start again. Near the bottom, I put the truck in high, eased the clutch out, gave it a LITTLE gas, then cut for the inside of the corner. I pulled around the corner fine. Had it not gone so well, I was willing to even grab a bit of the ditch, rather than be thrown across the road by centrifugal force.Always be looking for the landing spot.

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  • KellyCraig commented on petercd's instructable How to Make a Negative Ion air ionizer1 year ago
    How to Make a Negative Ion air ionizer

    Somewhere, I have a sixties Popular Mechanics magazine with the plans for a transcripitor, like submarines use. It used a car coil, of that era, and stovepipe housed in a wood case. The unit was mounted vertically. As such, tapping the side of the pipe would cause all the debris attracted to the pipe to fall into a tray at the bottom. For safety, the system deactivated with the clean out door was opened.

    For the foil you recommend, I wonder if gold leafing you buy in hobby shops would work. It's cheap because it's so thin.

    I know squat about electronics, but the engineers at Bangor Sub Base used to hand me drawings [on a napkin or whatever] and I'd get to make prototypes for them. One was a capacitor forming device for high voltage caps used on the big beasts you used to see on Navy movies (the screen went "blip," "blip," "blip."To keep from frying anyone tamping with the end product, I added a micro switch that was normally on, When the door was closed, that part of the circuit was dead. With it open, it shorted the caps.Food for thought.

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  • KellyCraig commented on Scotttland's instructable Repairing Split Wood1 year ago
    Repairing Split Wood

    Sorry for being so slow to get back to you.Keep in mind, stain is, for the most part, a surface coat. Of course, much of it can get into cracks, grooves and open cells below the surface.If the wood isn't oozing oil, it shouldn't be any problem staining it. As they say, do a small test sample. Let it set the appropriate amount of time to see if it hardens. If it does, you're good to go.Water based stains aside, stains are made with linseed oil, a hardening oil. If you apply them to wood after the fact, they will act to seal the wood, at least to some degree. That will help seal moisture out and reduce moisture loss, in addition to what the oil does.Anyway, I would slather oil on the top, sides and, if practical, the bottom. Let it soak in, and let it set for a few weeks before appl...

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    Sorry for being so slow to get back to you.Keep in mind, stain is, for the most part, a surface coat. Of course, much of it can get into cracks, grooves and open cells below the surface.If the wood isn't oozing oil, it shouldn't be any problem staining it. As they say, do a small test sample. Let it set the appropriate amount of time to see if it hardens. If it does, you're good to go.Water based stains aside, stains are made with linseed oil, a hardening oil. If you apply them to wood after the fact, they will act to seal the wood, at least to some degree. That will help seal moisture out and reduce moisture loss, in addition to what the oil does.Anyway, I would slather oil on the top, sides and, if practical, the bottom. Let it soak in, and let it set for a few weeks before applying the stain. Monitor some small cracks or splits to see if they are starting to close. If they are, you might want to drag the process out. When you think you've done all you can, go to the stain. If you are ready to bag it and move on, you can wash the excess off with a good oil busting dish soap. Just let it dry for a day or two before moving ahead.Again, remember oil is a surface coat and not the most durable/wearing finish, to say the least.

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  • KellyCraig commented on mdavis19's instructable Learn how to cut circles out of glass1 year ago
    Learn how to cut circles out of glass

    On a whim I just bought about twenty pounds of lead solder, a few hundred pounds of stained glass, about eighty feet of came (the stuff they use for edges of leaded glass), five or six rolls of foil and a few tools, including a grinder and iron, for a hundred bucks. I've never dabbled in stained or leaded glass before, but I've been mildly curious about it. The deal was a great chance to test the waters. Since the deal didn't include a glass cutter, I resorted to the trusty ones in my tool box, trimmed a few pieces of scrap that were included, foiled and soldered them. Meanwhile, I bought a couple good ones (carbide wheels) off line. When the new cutters arrived, I tested them and, WOW. Night and day. Now I know not to just leave the cutters bouncing off other tools during storage....

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    On a whim I just bought about twenty pounds of lead solder, a few hundred pounds of stained glass, about eighty feet of came (the stuff they use for edges of leaded glass), five or six rolls of foil and a few tools, including a grinder and iron, for a hundred bucks. I've never dabbled in stained or leaded glass before, but I've been mildly curious about it. The deal was a great chance to test the waters. Since the deal didn't include a glass cutter, I resorted to the trusty ones in my tool box, trimmed a few pieces of scrap that were included, foiled and soldered them. Meanwhile, I bought a couple good ones (carbide wheels) off line. When the new cutters arrived, I tested them and, WOW. Night and day. Now I know not to just leave the cutters bouncing off other tools during storage. From what others say, I'll come to appreciate the carbide cutters, if I take care of them (e.g., fill and use the oil reservoirs or dip the tips in oil routinely).I'm anxious to try some circles now too. Thanks for the tips.

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  • KellyCraig commented on Scotttland's instructable Repairing Split Wood1 year ago
    Repairing Split Wood

    I buy my epoxy in the gallon and a half containers (2-1 mix) and use it for cracks. The two to one mix seems much thinner than the fifty-fifty mixes I use, so it soaks in well.For light woods, I don't color the mix. No one has yet to notice the clear fill on in large cracks on a few butternut and other light wood ornaments I've madePainters' putty works good for sealing the end of the cracks. The portion with the putty can be cut off with a miter or other means.

    For those dealing with cracked beams and such, the ideal is to address the problem before it starts. Sealing the wood doesn't work. Eventually, the wood will still lose moisture, which causes it to shrink, resulting in splits and cracks. I purchased a maple cutting board with this problem, then restored it using the approach noted below.For the butcher block, I flooded the top with mineral oil. The first bottle disappeared almost as soon as I put it on. The second went in slower, so I just added more to the spots that soaked in each time I walked past to another project. Finally, it began taking the oil in rather slowly. At that point, I slathered on a generous layer and just walked way.I ignored the top for a couple weeks. When I checked on it again, the oil had all soaked in. T...

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    For those dealing with cracked beams and such, the ideal is to address the problem before it starts. Sealing the wood doesn't work. Eventually, the wood will still lose moisture, which causes it to shrink, resulting in splits and cracks. I purchased a maple cutting board with this problem, then restored it using the approach noted below.For the butcher block, I flooded the top with mineral oil. The first bottle disappeared almost as soon as I put it on. The second went in slower, so I just added more to the spots that soaked in each time I walked past to another project. Finally, it began taking the oil in rather slowly. At that point, I slathered on a generous layer and just walked way.I ignored the top for a couple weeks. When I checked on it again, the oil had all soaked in. Too, it swelled the wood, just as water would, causing ALL the cracks and separations to close.The same approach can be taken with exterior wood surfaces. If you applied a generous first application, the obviousness of your efforts would disappear shortly. A second application would fare only a bit better. However, the third or additional coats would remain evident for years.The oil applications do not evaporate. They disappear because the oil wicks to the next dry area, deeper in the wood, until there is too little oil to wick further or the saturation has equalized throughout the wood.The main things, when using oils to replace lost moisture are:1) Use a non-hardening oil. That could be something like Chevron Shingle Oil (about ten dollars a gallon, in quantity), cheap motor oil (your mileage may vary) or mineral oil.2) To increase penetration, I'd thin it about ten or fifteen percent. You can use paint thinner, naphtha, mineral spirits or turpentine. I'd opt for the cheapest, unless I was working on a specialty project. 3) The more aggressive and patient you are in your applications, the better your results will be. You can keep adding oil without doing anything to the surface, whether a day after an application or years after. The applications will build on each other .HINT: Buy the cheapest mineral oil you can for food grade items. That would be around a buck or so a pint.NOTES: Cedar shingles that are saturated with oil, in addition to not shrinking and splitting or cracking, will remain more resilient. Normally, walking on them in the middle of the summer would cause them to break. However, if they were saturated with oil, the would remain more flexible and less prone to breakage.

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  • Inexpensive garage lights from LED strips

    Just guessing here, but I suspect heat is a lessor problem with LED's used as they are in this ible because they are so spread out.My dine room has the incandescent shaped LED's and the heat sinks get too hot to hold. On the other hand, I have strips that use as much light, but touching anywhere along the strip is a non issue.

    One of the advantages of the magnetic power supplies is, you can dim through them, instead of just on the output.When I remodeled my kitchen, LED's were still cost prohibitive, so I wired the counter lights for halogens. This meant I had 120VAC to the lights and dimming at the switch panel could only be done by adjusting the 120 volt output to the lights.Standard transformers-rectifiers are inexpensive, but you can only alter the power they put out, and not what is put into them. Magnetic transformer-rectifiers don't have this limitation. This means you can put the transformer near the load and adjust what's fed into it. Using a magnetic power supply, you still have to use a switch designed for LED's and you will pay at least three times as much for the power supply, but it does all...

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    One of the advantages of the magnetic power supplies is, you can dim through them, instead of just on the output.When I remodeled my kitchen, LED's were still cost prohibitive, so I wired the counter lights for halogens. This meant I had 120VAC to the lights and dimming at the switch panel could only be done by adjusting the 120 volt output to the lights.Standard transformers-rectifiers are inexpensive, but you can only alter the power they put out, and not what is put into them. Magnetic transformer-rectifiers don't have this limitation. This means you can put the transformer near the load and adjust what's fed into it. Using a magnetic power supply, you still have to use a switch designed for LED's and you will pay at least three times as much for the power supply, but it does allow you to install dimmable LED's on an existing systems, without tearing up walls to run a low voltage line back to the switche.

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