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  • gwlinn123 commented on fcfelix's instructable Fire Lamp8 weeks ago
    Fire Lamp

    Very, Very, Nice! I, too, have been interested in simulated candles/flame and this is the best I've seen so far! I use a lot of the WS2812b's in homemade outdoor displays that I make for each holiday. For example, for Valentines, I use them in a heart that I made with a 3D printer.Another idea for your "lamp" is to purchase a large glass like the own shown in the attached photo. It's about 3 1/4 dia by 7 inches tall costing only $1 at the Dollar Store. Here, I've just enclosed some "fairy leds" and put the glass upside down on a base I fabricated in my 3D printer. That way, I don't have to worry about the environment. The small black box contains a DC to DC converter used to convert a 5VDC Wall Wart output to 3.3VDC for the leds.I think I will first try to dup...

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    Very, Very, Nice! I, too, have been interested in simulated candles/flame and this is the best I've seen so far! I use a lot of the WS2812b's in homemade outdoor displays that I make for each holiday. For example, for Valentines, I use them in a heart that I made with a 3D printer.Another idea for your "lamp" is to purchase a large glass like the own shown in the attached photo. It's about 3 1/4 dia by 7 inches tall costing only $1 at the Dollar Store. Here, I've just enclosed some "fairy leds" and put the glass upside down on a base I fabricated in my 3D printer. That way, I don't have to worry about the environment. The small black box contains a DC to DC converter used to convert a 5VDC Wall Wart output to 3.3VDC for the leds.I think I will first try to duplicate your lamp inside one of these glasses. I will print a thin 3D translucent insert to simulate the "frosting" you have. My end idea is to build a number of these for use as outdoor walkway lights.Thanks, again, for sharing! Gary

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  • gwlinn123 commented on davethewoodworker's instructable CNC Love Sign5 months ago
    CNC Love Sign

    Great Instructable! Interestingly, my son and his wife have the same initials, A and L. Would you care to share your Aspire file? I have Aspire and it would save me a lot of time by not having to implement your design. Thanks, Gary

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  • gwlinn123's instructable Vacuum Seal 3D Filament Reels's weekly stats: 8 months ago
    • Vacuum Seal 3D Filament Reels
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  • gwlinn123 commented on keebie81's instructable Weather Forecast Cloud8 months ago
    Weather Forecast Cloud

    VERY, VERY Nice! Great design skills and excellent documentation! Anyone who documents knows that the time it takes to document can often exceed the time it takes to build the project.I like the use of "multiple skills" in this project. Even if one doesn't really need the cloud, building it enhances one's skills in several areas. Of course, one does not have to build all of it. That is, you can prove out the electronics and get experience in that area without making the cloud.Thanks for including the CNC files. I now have one and building my skills in this area alone is valuable to me. I see that the "reverse engineering" has started. But, this is to be expected and "healthy" from an engineering standpoint and one way people learn. The person with t...

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    VERY, VERY Nice! Great design skills and excellent documentation! Anyone who documents knows that the time it takes to document can often exceed the time it takes to build the project.I like the use of "multiple skills" in this project. Even if one doesn't really need the cloud, building it enhances one's skills in several areas. Of course, one does not have to build all of it. That is, you can prove out the electronics and get experience in that area without making the cloud.Thanks for including the CNC files. I now have one and building my skills in this area alone is valuable to me. I see that the "reverse engineering" has started. But, this is to be expected and "healthy" from an engineering standpoint and one way people learn. The person with the "original idea" is to be given a lot of credit and I again thank you for your design and sharing.Gary

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  • gwlinn123 commented on stillash's instructable Hamilton Wall Art9 months ago
    Hamilton Wall Art

    Thanks for your reply. I've had my XCarve for almost 2 years now but have not done any "complicated" carvings yet. I started with Easel, but, back then, it seemed to have its problems. I also don't like to be handcuffed to a web-based anything. Although it's pricey, I purchased VCarve desktop. It's a really powerful program although there is a steep learning curve. There are plenty of VCarve tutorials and you can try out a "crippled" demo before you buy.Inventables has continued to improve Easel and now has some video tutorials that I found interesting, like how to do inlays. They have a strong user community and I often get tips there and there is plenty of information on the internet.I think making "signs" is a good way to learn CNC. I started by ...

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    Thanks for your reply. I've had my XCarve for almost 2 years now but have not done any "complicated" carvings yet. I started with Easel, but, back then, it seemed to have its problems. I also don't like to be handcuffed to a web-based anything. Although it's pricey, I purchased VCarve desktop. It's a really powerful program although there is a steep learning curve. There are plenty of VCarve tutorials and you can try out a "crippled" demo before you buy.Inventables has continued to improve Easel and now has some video tutorials that I found interesting, like how to do inlays. They have a strong user community and I often get tips there and there is plenty of information on the internet.I think making "signs" is a good way to learn CNC. I started by just making "trial" signs on #2 pine from Home Depot since it's cheap. Now, I use their "clear" pine, more expensive, but "no knots". If I need a wider board, I edge-glue 2 6" boards together.I found that, with pine, anyway, pre-spraying with acrylic reduces tearout. But, then I have the problem you had- how do you (easily) manage the different layers. That is, when you want to paint and stain. I think I saw that some have been using shellac. I don't know that I have this correct, but it sounds like you can stain, shellac (seal), carve, paint the letters, and remove excess paint (before it dries) with mineral spirits without hurting the shellac.There is also some kind of "contact-paper" like material that you apply before you carve. Then you paint the letters, then remove the material. Regular contact paper doesn't stick well enough, I tried it. The material recommended is somewhat pricey but maybe worth it in terms of "labor-saving".Thanks again for sharing your project. CNC expertise, like a number of things in life, has to be "built-up" by gaining knowledge from others and then by trial and error - "hands-on".

    Very nice, thanks for sharing!I see you are using an Inventables XCarve CNC. Did you use their free Easel s/w or VCarve s/w to create the lettering?

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  • gwlinn123 followed Ikkalebob10 months ago
      • 3D Printed Animatronic Eye Mechanism on the Cheap
      • Smartphone Controlled Cat Laser
      • The Witcher 3 Full-Scale Chort/Fiend Sculpture in DAS Clay
  • 3D Printed Animatronic Eye Mechanism on the Cheap

    Excellent and how cool! Going to make as a Halloween yard decoration. Will redo code to automate. Using some kind of PIR or Sonic sensor, would like to cause extra effects if people are walking by. Thanks for sharing and your EXCELLENT documentation!

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  • 3D Printed Arduino Robot Arm - LittleArm 2C

    What an incredible instructable! If I could just take and post pictures and document as well as you, I would be more than happy!I do Arduinos and have 3D printers. I want to try this just to see if I can.In addition to the STEM aspects of this project, it teaches how to "design" and "construct". That is, don't overtighten, and, how things actually go together. There are a number of skills required (or helpful) here, but that's why there are Dads and Moms and others who help their children and others get interested in something other than video games (no offense meant, just that there are other things in life that may be of interest). This is a "space-age" Pine Wood Derby project ; if you were a Boy Scout.

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  • gwlinn123 commented on mikeasaurus's instructable DIY Zero Clearance Table Saw Insert11 months ago
    DIY Zero Clearance Table Saw Insert

    Thanks for sharing your incredibly detailed method of making zero clearance inserts. It seems hard to find the specific blank for a particular saw and they aren't very cheap. I only have one that I purchased and I could use about 6.After seeing your article, I'm wondering if I can't make them with my 3D printer. It should also be possible to add the "hold down" clip. I will probably use Nylon as the print material for strength.Also, my blade does not retract much below the surface of the insert. When I cut the slot in my "store-bought" insert, I had to dangerously hand-lower the insert to get the slot started. Then, I could use the board and clamp method you show. I think I could work around this problem, if necessary, with a 3D printed version by simply makin...

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    Thanks for sharing your incredibly detailed method of making zero clearance inserts. It seems hard to find the specific blank for a particular saw and they aren't very cheap. I only have one that I purchased and I could use about 6.After seeing your article, I'm wondering if I can't make them with my 3D printer. It should also be possible to add the "hold down" clip. I will probably use Nylon as the print material for strength.Also, my blade does not retract much below the surface of the insert. When I cut the slot in my "store-bought" insert, I had to dangerously hand-lower the insert to get the slot started. Then, I could use the board and clamp method you show. I think I could work around this problem, if necessary, with a 3D printed version by simply making the insert a little thinner near where the slot will be.

    You are correct. Although I am still a "newbee" with respect to 3D printing, one idea is to make the part without much additional work. Since all 3D printers are not the same, I have found that dimensions are not always as specified. For example, hole diameters are often (for me, anyway) a little smaller than I specified. So, I often print a "test" piece where I do not commit to the whole part, just to some feature that I'm interested in to test the results.With respect to "thinning" an area, that seems pretty easy to specify once you have somewhat mastered the CAD program used to generate the part. My first trial will be basically just the "outline" of the inset. That way, I can find out if my measurements are close enough. There's always ...

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    You are correct. Although I am still a "newbee" with respect to 3D printing, one idea is to make the part without much additional work. Since all 3D printers are not the same, I have found that dimensions are not always as specified. For example, hole diameters are often (for me, anyway) a little smaller than I specified. So, I often print a "test" piece where I do not commit to the whole part, just to some feature that I'm interested in to test the results.With respect to "thinning" an area, that seems pretty easy to specify once you have somewhat mastered the CAD program used to generate the part. My first trial will be basically just the "outline" of the inset. That way, I can find out if my measurements are close enough. There's always the "is it English or Metric" question. For 3D work, I work in metric. But, older things, like my 30 year old Sears table saw, are probably English.With 3D printing, as it seems to be the case with woodworking, the more you do, the better results you get. (So, can I live forever?)

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  • Wire wrapping tool- CHEAP, QUALITY AND EASY!

    I got interested in maybe getting a 22 ga tool (for power). They are available, BUT, it looks like the diameter of the tools will not allow you to wrap pins on 0.1 in spacing which is what I mostly use now.Searching, I found that some had tried to make their own wrap tools out of ball point pens guts and by 3D printing tools. I have 3D printing capability and experimented a little. It didn't work out well.My (only) tool is for 30 ga. Looking at ampacity, it looks like 30 ga is good for about 0.9 amps. That would be good enough for most of what I do. There may be other considerations for high frequency work, for example, but, I don't do that.I had some concern about using my tool and 30 ga on the pins that I now would wrap to (not your standard wire wrap socket pins). But, the wra...

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    I got interested in maybe getting a 22 ga tool (for power). They are available, BUT, it looks like the diameter of the tools will not allow you to wrap pins on 0.1 in spacing which is what I mostly use now.Searching, I found that some had tried to make their own wrap tools out of ball point pens guts and by 3D printing tools. I have 3D printing capability and experimented a little. It didn't work out well.My (only) tool is for 30 ga. Looking at ampacity, it looks like 30 ga is good for about 0.9 amps. That would be good enough for most of what I do. There may be other considerations for high frequency work, for example, but, I don't do that.I had some concern about using my tool and 30 ga on the pins that I now would wrap to (not your standard wire wrap socket pins). But, the wraps seem "solid", at least for "experimenter" work.I have to also crimp wires onto connectors that attach to the same pins. Crimping a single 30 ga wire to a pin seemed ok but it pulled out easily. So, I "doubled" the wire before crimping and it seemed good.Bottom line, for now I'm going to use 30 ga for my hobby work. I'm not designing for something to go to Mars so it can't be any worse than what I'm now doing which is "lap soldering" connections. I need faster and wire wrap is faster.

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  • Outdoor, Weatherproof Fixture for Lifx or Hue

    Thanks for your excellent work in developing a lost-cost project and documenting it extremely well and sharing!I've been thinking about some outdoor "pathway" lighting for some time. Another recent post used a "flower vase" for the "globe", made a concrete base, and used "fairy" lights inside. I have some 115 VAC bulbs that are rated "inside only". So, your project has inspired me to merge several concepts.I will probably make the base with my 3D printer. (I know that not all have access to one, so your base is a good solution.) Then, I will use the bulbs as you suggest with some kind of glass cover.Thanks again, for solving a problem and creating something unique in a very low cost way.

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  • Wire wrapping tools made inexpensive. I made it at TechShop.

    I realize it has been quite some time since you posted this, but 3D printing has vastly improved since. I would like to try your design if you would post the STL file.In any case, thanks for taking the time to post. I have a metal wire wrap tool but it is limited to small diameter wire. I would like sometimes, maybe mostly, use 22 gauge. A plastic tool should work out fine for home hobby use. I generally print with ABS, but here, I would use Nylon for strength after proving the design.

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  • Wire wrapping tool- CHEAP, QUALITY AND EASY!

    Thanks for this interesting project! I, too, used wire wrap on my old computer boards. Now, this seems like a lost art. Try to find wire wrap sockets. They're on Ebay, but most are for dips. I'm doing Arduino things now that don't usually require dips. Still, the thought of using wire wrap is interesting because it is fast and reliable (if done well, even with the "hand" tool shown). Soldering small wires to pins is much harder than a wire wrap.

    I found some T44 wire wrap Vector "component" pins on Amazon. About $0.15 each, but when you get older, you may think that swapping money for time is a good trade.It's probably too late to change technology, but wire wrap was certainly much more reliable than plugging jumper wires and resistor ends into protoboards.

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  • gwlinn123 commented on talk2bruce's instructable Acrylic Arduino Prototyping Stand1 year ago
    Acrylic Arduino Prototyping Stand

    Thanks for your inquiry. I actually don't have it anymore and never really used it that much. It was just too big and not really that flexible. However, I still look at other DIY and professional designs to see if there are any good ideas for me.What I have been using is shown in the photo. The 3D printed Arduino holder can take an UNO, or, in this case, a NANO. A small breadboard along side allows some wiring. Here, I'm using the NANO to drive a small LCD display. The 3D printed holder design is from ThingIverse and I have a 3D printer.If you're just getting started, you'll probably just have to find out what works best for you. I have a number of these holders and UNOs and NANOs (very cheap on Ebay) so I don't have to tear down something to build something else. Good luck!!

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  • gwlinn123 commented on talk2bruce's instructable Acrylic Arduino Prototyping Stand1 year ago
    Acrylic Arduino Prototyping Stand

    Thanks for your inquiry! The prototyping stand I described didn't last very long because it didn't turn out to be very useful. Even though I had been a long time electronic hobbyist, I was just learning Arduino. So, I put together something that I thought would be useful. Over the years since, I have been doing something entirely different which I will try to describe. However, whenever I see a "DIY" or "professional" development platform, I STILL look at it to see if there is anything that might be useful to me.Pardon me if I get too wordy. It would be nice if we always operated in the "ready, aim, fire" mode. But, too often it's "ready, fire, aim" because we're not really sure what we are trying to accomplish. And then, goals change over...

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    Thanks for your inquiry! The prototyping stand I described didn't last very long because it didn't turn out to be very useful. Even though I had been a long time electronic hobbyist, I was just learning Arduino. So, I put together something that I thought would be useful. Over the years since, I have been doing something entirely different which I will try to describe. However, whenever I see a "DIY" or "professional" development platform, I STILL look at it to see if there is anything that might be useful to me.Pardon me if I get too wordy. It would be nice if we always operated in the "ready, aim, fire" mode. But, too often it's "ready, fire, aim" because we're not really sure what we are trying to accomplish. And then, goals change over time with experience and needs.Right now, I've been doing LED displays for my home using serially driven LEDs. I have been using the UNO prototyping holder shown in the photo from "ThingIverse". ThingIverse is a repository for "free" 3D printing objects. If your don't yet have a 3D printer, that would be a good next purchase. Here are some recommendations based upon my experience with Arduino:1. Use a NANO or UNO for most projects. Both are cheap, especially on Ebay. Rather than just buy one, dedicate one to a project that you would like to "keep".2. Document what you are doing: a. Before you start designing/building b., while you are designing/building, and c., after you're done. I know it's hard, but it's easier than going back later and trying to figure out what you've done. It's amazing how much of a prior work is directly usable in later designs.3. Use "free" Inkscape to document schematics. Use Word or MS NoteBook in general for words. If nothing else, use paper notebooks. Any notes are better than no notes or piles of yellow "stickies".4. Loose wires and "miswires" will drive you crazy so be careful.5. Simplify the initial design. Sure, you eventually want to send data over your entire house. But first, get it working in one place. The Arduino Serial Monitor is great for debugging and you don't need an external display or printer.6. The hardest part of a project is the "mechanical" build. So don't build anything, like drill any holes, until the design is working.7. Be prepared for design iteration. That is, few designs are perfect the first time around.8. There are tons of information available on the internet. Believe some of it but look at lots of it. I buy books as well so I don't have to re-find something on the net.9. There isn't a really good way for bypass trial and error learning so you'll just have to put your head down and keep trying.

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  • gwlinn123 commented on cbaetsen's instructable Antique Radio B-Battery Power Supply1 year ago
    Antique Radio B-Battery Power Supply

    Thanks for sharing this! I have a 1920's radio that I would like to try and restore. I already know that a major problem with old radios is that the capacitors need to be replaced. That said, my radio needs A and B power and I probably would not have attempted to get it working if I had to design my own power supplies.

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  • gwlinn123 commented on Penguin Manufacturing's instructable CNC T-Slot Hold Downs1 year ago
    CNC T-Slot Hold Downs

    Thanks for your CNC clamp version! I, too, have been worrying about clamping. Not enough pressure (or clamps) to prevent movement, gets in the way, or could be hit during carving. I found a similar idea somewhere before and 3D printed something very similar to your clamp. My first test on a very small item (2" x 2") was not good - the part was moving. My version was much thinner than yours.To make the slot, my first idea was to use my router table (not a shaper, although I could have used a shaper bit). Cutting a 1/4" slot in a 2" long piece was very dangerous. My long term idea was to make a small router table and "dedicate" a small, battery powered, trim router to making the slot. I guessed that most projects would be wider than 2".So, I have...

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    Thanks for your CNC clamp version! I, too, have been worrying about clamping. Not enough pressure (or clamps) to prevent movement, gets in the way, or could be hit during carving. I found a similar idea somewhere before and 3D printed something very similar to your clamp. My first test on a very small item (2" x 2") was not good - the part was moving. My version was much thinner than yours.To make the slot, my first idea was to use my router table (not a shaper, although I could have used a shaper bit). Cutting a 1/4" slot in a 2" long piece was very dangerous. My long term idea was to make a small router table and "dedicate" a small, battery powered, trim router to making the slot. I guessed that most projects would be wider than 2".So, I have made several of your hold downs and will try. I increased the width of the bolt slot to 9/32" for a 1/4" bolt. The bolt screws into a 1/4" imbedded nut in the T-track so I don't have the above board protrusion that you show. What I think I would eventually like to see is a clamp that has some sort of "ratchet" mechanism that allows one to increase the pressure on the point of contact with the item to be carved without overly stressing the clamp.

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  • Digital 3D printer filament counter use PS/2 mouse

    Thanks for this project! It looks like it could be "half" of what I'm looking for.The problem: Knowing how much filament is LEFT on a reel. I don't care so much about color, but I don't want to start a multi-hour printing and then run out of filament.My slicer, Simplify3D, calculates how much filament will be used for any given printing. Knowing how much filament is on a reel when new, I could simply take a pen and mark up the side of the reel as the filament is used. But, this is "old school".My first printer, a DaVinci, required use of proprietary filament contained within a cartridge, a turn off for many. Each cartridge has a "chip" that records remaining filament. So, I would like some electronic way, such as this, to "mark up the side of th...

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    Thanks for this project! It looks like it could be "half" of what I'm looking for.The problem: Knowing how much filament is LEFT on a reel. I don't care so much about color, but I don't want to start a multi-hour printing and then run out of filament.My slicer, Simplify3D, calculates how much filament will be used for any given printing. Knowing how much filament is on a reel when new, I could simply take a pen and mark up the side of the reel as the filament is used. But, this is "old school".My first printer, a DaVinci, required use of proprietary filament contained within a cartridge, a turn off for many. Each cartridge has a "chip" that records remaining filament. So, I would like some electronic way, such as this, to "mark up the side of the reel".Your device records usage. So, what's needed is a way for your device to "write" to a chip on the reel. Since the reel is turning, direct wiring seems out. Perhaps an optical or IOT solution. I know I could simply make a cartridge, but I don't particularly want the extra bulk for every reel.

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  • gwlinn123 commented on JP'sW's instructable Transfer Photograph onto Wood1 year ago
    Transfer Photograph onto Wood

    You're probably right if one tried to actually use a router. I do have a smaller, trim router, and a Dremel. I neglected to admit that I also have a "home user" CNC machine. (That, I have yet to learn how to use!) Theoretically, then, I should be able to "carve" out the wood plaque AND add the text without any "handwork". Technology is wonderful if you can use it effectively. That's why I appreciated this Instructable that used simple, cheaper, tools to achieve an amazing result.

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  • gwlinn123 commented on JP'sW's instructable Transfer Photograph onto Wood1 year ago
    Transfer Photograph onto Wood

    Very nice, I'm going to try it! I appreciated the fact that you showed how to do this with a minimal amount of tools and cost.As an alternate to pallet wood, I sometimes use rustic fence boards. They are not "rough sawn", which saves work, and come without nails, which saves tools.I would also like to try engraving a caption under the picture with a router.

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  • How to Make a Dehumidifier (Thermoelectric Cooling)

    Thanks for your comment! My filament storage container is relatively small so I don't think I will have that much condensate. Secondly, I haven't done this yet so I don't know what will happen. Lastly, I have a pretty large home so evaporating maybe a small amount will not be that wasteful.

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  • How to Make a Dehumidifier (Thermoelectric Cooling)

    Very nice, thanks! Just what I need for storing 3D printer filament reels which are notorious for absorbing moisture and not printing as well. I built a sealed cabinet for storing reels and have a humidity meter in it. Currently, I use an Eva-Dry desiccant pack which can be recharged by plugging it into a wall outlet.I have already purchased a completely assembled Peltier cooler from Ebay. But, I hadn't fully thought about how to use it until your article:1. Use my 3D printer to print plastic panels instead of the foam ones you used for long term durability.2. As another suggested, use a DC power supply instead of a battery.3. Either run continuously, put on a simple timer, or use a humidity sensor and an Arduino to monitor and control.4. Add a drain tube from the cabinet to rem...

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    Very nice, thanks! Just what I need for storing 3D printer filament reels which are notorious for absorbing moisture and not printing as well. I built a sealed cabinet for storing reels and have a humidity meter in it. Currently, I use an Eva-Dry desiccant pack which can be recharged by plugging it into a wall outlet.I have already purchased a completely assembled Peltier cooler from Ebay. But, I hadn't fully thought about how to use it until your article:1. Use my 3D printer to print plastic panels instead of the foam ones you used for long term durability.2. As another suggested, use a DC power supply instead of a battery.3. Either run continuously, put on a simple timer, or use a humidity sensor and an Arduino to monitor and control.4. Add a drain tube from the cabinet to remove the condensate. Since I'm far away from a real drain, drain into a larger container and let the house AC evaporate. I have also been "vacuum sealing" open reels, but, that is somewhat of a pain.

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  • gwlinn123 commented on Akinventor's instructable Solder Arduino Header Pins Easily2 years ago
    Solder Arduino Header Pins Easily

    Great Idea! I have soldered a number of these headers and am always concerned that either the header will not remain flat against the board or that it will be crooked. So, I solder 1 pin and then inspect for alignment before proceeding. Your method would be a lot faster and more accurate the first time. I would be concerned about putting heat on the breadboard through the pin, but, the small breadboards are "dirt cheap" on Ebay so you could just dedicate one for header pin soldering.

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