DIY Wood in Concrete DESK Lamp

6,095

92

3

About: Discover woodworking, concrete, LEDs, home decor and DIY projects you'll love.

I am a big fan of blending materials, and I want to show you how approachable this project can be. I think this process can open up a world of ideas for your next project. With a few simple materials and a few hours of your time you too can create an amazing lamp or planter from concrete.

Melamine

To see more cool projects like this be sure to subscribe and follow me here.

Youtube: Link

Instagram: Link

Step 1: Making the Forms

After cutting all the parts to make this DIY concrete form, mark the location for the screws. Next, drill a piolet hole add the screws. If you want nice round corners now is an excellent time to add silicone.

Now that you have a box, you will need to add a bottom. Although you can use wood screws to attach the bottom, hot glue works well.

For an even easier solution, you can use a juice carton. There are two downsides I see with this method. First thing is the sides are flimsy and may require some additional support to keep its shape. The next thing to know is the concrete will take the shape of the form. Meaning all connecting points and imperfection in the cartoon will show up in the cured concrete.

Step 2: Prep Work

Take a small piece of wood and shape it your liking. I used a piece of oak for this project. Try giving it a natural look. Using a rotary tool like a Dremel can help you get the job done. After you have dialed in on the shape, drive a few screws into wood. The cement will hold on to the wood after getting into the cavities created, but to ensure this is not going anywhere the cement will lock on to the screws as well. Add hot glue to the block of wood and place it in one of the corners.

You will need an inch and half PVC or one that fit your light socket. Make sure the block of wood does not block the middle. Now, add hot on the inside of the PVC, a lot of it. Then, quickly turn the PVC down in the center of the form. The hot glue will spread out creating a base and adhering itself to the bottom.

To eliminate any drilling, later on, take a piece of foam and glue it to the bottom. Make sure the form is touching the PVC and wall you chose to have the power cord exit the DIY concrete lamp.

Step 3: Mixing the Cement

This was a two-part process. The first pour was the base (I went with white). After pouring the resin on the workpiece, I used a brush to evenly spread it. It also helps if you’re on a leveled surface. Now you’ll need to remove the bubbles. I tried a heat gun and I was not a fan, I like the torch better. This part is quite simple, start from one end then work your way to the other. Keep the torch moving, once you’re done it should look like glass. Now, begin your second pour, adding all the colors you will want to see in the mix. Once you’ve mixed the second container of epoxy, you will transfer it to a new container (I used plastic cups) then is when you’re going to add your individual colors.

Step 4: Removing the Form

After an hour or so I used pliers to twist out the PVC tube. Then I removed the form. The corners came out a bit sharp, so I took sandpaper and wet sand the corner s to give it a bit of round over. Next, remove the hot glue from the wood.

Step 5: Adding a Finish

Even though I liked the raw look better, applying a finish makes it feel finish. I used spray Lacquer to add the finishing touches.

Step 6: Adding the Power Cord/socket

The light socket I used was a perfect fit for the PVC. I placed the socket in the concrete base. Then, hot glued the power cord in the slot. I also put hot glue on the inside to hold the sock in place. If you ever get bored of this, you can always remove the lamp cord and use It in another project. Adding felts pad was the finishing touches, not only does it give a finished look, but it also protects any surface you wish to place this on.

Step 7: Final

If you have been intimidated with working with concrete prior I hope this post gives you some confidence to give it a try. At the end of the day, concrete is cheap and if it doesn’t come out great the first time just give it a try again. You can not succeed or fail if you do not try. Thanks for checking out this post and make something cool!

If you find this helpful be sure to subscribe and follow me here.

Youtube: Link

Instagram: Link

Share

    Recommendations

    • Tape Contest

      Tape Contest
    • Arduino Contest 2019

      Arduino Contest 2019
    • Trash to Treasure

      Trash to Treasure

    3 Discussions

    0
    None
    neilscott100

    4 weeks ago

    nice idea, i favor blending component, you could make a brass top or inox top to the project and wire up a touch sensor onto that, they cost 1.99 more or less off ebay and are brilliant to dim lights as long as they are filament and not leds, so an old edison non led replica is a good lamp. i use the sensors on steampunk lights i make. that way by interacting with the lamp touching it here and there different things will happen or move or light up, i even build switches into taps so when they turn the wheel they act as a switch rather than a valve. the other thing you could do for a really high quality gloss finish line the mould with vinyl and vibrate the mould on a orbital sander to get the concrete to become more dense and release any trapped air. It also gives a nicer finish for vibrating it for a minute or so when its wet.

    0
    None
    timdekker1825

    4 weeks ago

    Very nice! I like the rustic combination of the wood and concrete :)