Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile
  • How NOT to Make a River Table (For Your Chair!)

    Actually, going through the process of showing problems and how you solve them is the best way for others to learn with you. It is an excellent teaching technique.Things I learned from you two: -- epoxy sets up and as its strength builds it non-symmetrically pulls against the form of the river because the river is not symmetric at all. Thus, using some weights on top of the two boards rather would likely best correct this problem.-- apply pearl flakes after the epoxy is partial set. May require some test cures with scrap to learn timing. Same goes for river curls with dye to prevent surface tension from moving it to edges.-- Cross cut sled every time; don't bother with that 90° crosscut slide bar. Next on MY list to build for MY table saw!-- Surface tension pulls the epoxy over to...

    see more »

    Actually, going through the process of showing problems and how you solve them is the best way for others to learn with you. It is an excellent teaching technique.Things I learned from you two: -- epoxy sets up and as its strength builds it non-symmetrically pulls against the form of the river because the river is not symmetric at all. Thus, using some weights on top of the two boards rather would likely best correct this problem.-- apply pearl flakes after the epoxy is partial set. May require some test cures with scrap to learn timing. Same goes for river curls with dye to prevent surface tension from moving it to edges.-- Cross cut sled every time; don't bother with that 90° crosscut slide bar. Next on MY list to build for MY table saw!-- Surface tension pulls the epoxy over to river edges and requires a final leveling with planer. Maybe next time consider facing "best" / top surface down against the MDF form?thanks for the fine job of teaching me and others.

    Yeah. I do not believe that was what occurred here. I think the epoxy cured against two angled surfaces and the stresses unequally pulled the two boards off of flat. I could be wrong, but that makes most sense. This happened in a short period of time, relatively, and wood moisture related things happening AFTER this was assembled, were likely very small.

    Like I said above, VISCOSITY is key. make some test pours with a tongue depressor or something similar. Pour, wait X minutes place the stick vertically in the pour. Does it stand up straight? Find that point in time. Then, add particles or dye Y minutes or seconds after at various intervals. Results will guide you to correct timing. NOT temperature. It is the thickness (Viscosity) of the fluid which overrides surface tension that dictates inability for internal movement of particles.

    . . . STILL, it is best to using a good moisture meter and verify moisture is down below 10%, I believe, before making fine furniture. Verify that number!

    View Instructable »
  • Insulating a Floor Underneath the Crawlspace

    Toooo much work. Both Darbin's and yours. Her effort here is a must experience for anyone who has every tried this. You have to learn the hard way! Darbin is a TROOPER! I have tackled similar things with foam insulation and learned that using Great Stuff foam(as Darbin did, in the end) is the simplest for both HOLDING and keeping insulation value. Darbin's hard earned and hard learned lesson of making the insulation "shorter" than necessary is the important clue here. If the space is 14 1/2" make the insulation 13 3/4" or a bit less. Ahead of time make some small wood wedges about 2 or 3" long with a 20° or so taper, making about 20, 1" wide. Before any cutting go under the shed with a pencil and paper or call out the rectangle sizes to someone who c...

    see more »

    Toooo much work. Both Darbin's and yours. Her effort here is a must experience for anyone who has every tried this. You have to learn the hard way! Darbin is a TROOPER! I have tackled similar things with foam insulation and learned that using Great Stuff foam(as Darbin did, in the end) is the simplest for both HOLDING and keeping insulation value. Darbin's hard earned and hard learned lesson of making the insulation "shorter" than necessary is the important clue here. If the space is 14 1/2" make the insulation 13 3/4" or a bit less. Ahead of time make some small wood wedges about 2 or 3" long with a 20° or so taper, making about 20, 1" wide. Before any cutting go under the shed with a pencil and paper or call out the rectangle sizes to someone who can write down dimensions for the first 4 or 5 areas, in order. (Using a utility knife cut half through the foam board and break off the pieces-- no jig saw work, no "magnetic" foam particles flying around!) Cut these pieces out and have your helper hand them in order to you. Apply foam to the face of each piece, wait a minute or two, and not excessive amount of foam; then use wedges to brace edges of foam against floor trusses to temporarily hold them in place. While you are doing this the helper applies foam to remaining foam pieces and hands them off in order. By the time the 5th area is covered the first foam board can have its wedges removed and RE-USED. Handy. When complete with this work over entire floor go back with the foam and do exactly what Darbin did-- foam the edges of all spots. The trick here is don't remove the wedges too soon. Time how long the first piece requires to stay up with gravity against it and no wedges to gauge how critical your timing needs be. Actually, using just two nails per area is sufficient and possibly a better solution vs wedges. Nails are an insignificant drain in heat transfer-- especially in this non-critical situation. The real critical insulation areas are in the ceiling of a structure, not the floor. One more point. It may have been a consideration to insulate and cover the floor from above rather than below. Yes, the door would need modification, but perhaps less painful!

    View Instructable »
  • Brian Schreiber commented on IJustLikeMakingThings's instructable Knife Grinding Jig3 months ago
    Knife Grinding Jig

    It seems to me you need one more tweak to this device to make it repeatable. After all, that is the whole point of what you are doing by keeping the MAIN angle the same along the length of the blade. If you had a flat, non-curved blade, you could just run the blade across the grind platform left to right and have a repeatable angle along the length. Addressing this problem DonS89 describes I would think requires a contoured template of some sort such that as you move the blade across the belt the blade point of contact is kept normal(@ 90°) to the direction of belt travel. For example as the flat edge is moved right( across the belt) and the curve enters the belt grind, the right side of the blade needs to dip downward in the same curve pattern as the left end of the blade. Doing s...

    see more »

    It seems to me you need one more tweak to this device to make it repeatable. After all, that is the whole point of what you are doing by keeping the MAIN angle the same along the length of the blade. If you had a flat, non-curved blade, you could just run the blade across the grind platform left to right and have a repeatable angle along the length. Addressing this problem DonS89 describes I would think requires a contoured template of some sort such that as you move the blade across the belt the blade point of contact is kept normal(@ 90°) to the direction of belt travel. For example as the flat edge is moved right( across the belt) and the curve enters the belt grind, the right side of the blade needs to dip downward in the same curve pattern as the left end of the blade. Doing so continually moves the blade edge so it remains normal to the cut line. I envision a curved template projecting from the right side of the grind platform and angling down with the particular blades curve pattern. The template likely needs some reasonable width to allow one to hold your "device" at the same angle as set. If made from Ferrous metal if you incorporated a strong magnet into your device's base it would help hold it against a template that may be only, say 1.5" wide. Hopefully, my description makes sense!

    View Instructable »
  • Brian Schreiber commented on diycreators's instructable Mini Table Saw Crosscut Sled 4 months ago
    Mini Table Saw Crosscut Sled

    Great job on the build and the Instructable. Succinct and clear. Thank you. I will build this!

    View Instructable »
  • LED 3D Printer Bed Leveling Tool

    Wondering what the relationship is between the LED level and actual vertical distance? What is the total range of the device, 10 LED's equates to what? 0.1 inches?? resolution?

    View Instructable »
  • Brian Schreiber followed tjaap4 months ago
      • Literary Clock Made From E-reader
      • Faux Power Plug As a Switch
      • Cheap Web-connected Thermostat
  • Brian Schreiber followed TheWoodKnight4 months ago
      • Hatchet Inspired Mallet
      • Make Accurate Dowels
      • Perfect Detailed Paint With Spray Masks