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  • GeorgR commented on cwbenz's instructable FAN Repair13 days ago
    FAN Repair

    With many cheap fans there is often wires from the winding protruding and *almost* touching the moving part of the axle. I have found the most common problem, aside from the fan sizing up after some time, is that when disassembling the motor (for maintenance, cleaning, new oil etc.) that you rip wires from the winding. You are correct (see 3) normally this means you need a new fan.But I was just able to repair a fan where I knew it was the winding. I found the ripped wire checking the entire winding with a loupe. I fixed it with: Good soldering iron, soldering paste, good solder and the thinnest 1mm heatshrink I had. The tiny wire ends thankfully were still close together to solder, then I put the heatshrink over the area and positioned the wire back in place where it was before roughl...

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    With many cheap fans there is often wires from the winding protruding and *almost* touching the moving part of the axle. I have found the most common problem, aside from the fan sizing up after some time, is that when disassembling the motor (for maintenance, cleaning, new oil etc.) that you rip wires from the winding. You are correct (see 3) normally this means you need a new fan.But I was just able to repair a fan where I knew it was the winding. I found the ripped wire checking the entire winding with a loupe. I fixed it with: Good soldering iron, soldering paste, good solder and the thinnest 1mm heatshrink I had. The tiny wire ends thankfully were still close together to solder, then I put the heatshrink over the area and positioned the wire back in place where it was before roughly in line with the winding, and fixed the entire thing back with some string.

    Yeah, happens often. You need to be very careful when you pull out the axle and back in.

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  • GeorgR commented on frEmn's instructable Repair Mouse With Double Click Problem8 months ago
    Repair Mouse With Double Click Problem

    Don't go all out and remove the copper spring. For most issues with mouse buttons, just take the cap off the micro switch and carefully clean the copper contacts inside with a small brush and alcohol (96% isopropyl alcohol). Chances are it will fix "bad" clicks and you won't need to remove the copper part.

    :/ <-- The face you're making when you spend 2hrs on a switch using this method, and then you realize you just did the WRONG switch, the one for the middle-button from the wheel...Anyway, here is my takeaway on this method:* If you take out the copper spring, you will hate the world, yourself and everything else. I figured it out now, but anyway...* I suggest NOT taking out the copper spring, but instead just take out the cap from the switch, and with a small brush like I did clean the parts with alcohol instead. I think that in a majority of cases, the problem is not a lack of "spring power" so you'd have to re-shape the spring, but oxidation on the parts. (I noticed the oxidation on several mice who had problems with the switch). Sometimes it can also be dust/hair prevent...

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    :/ <-- The face you're making when you spend 2hrs on a switch using this method, and then you realize you just did the WRONG switch, the one for the middle-button from the wheel...Anyway, here is my takeaway on this method:* If you take out the copper spring, you will hate the world, yourself and everything else. I figured it out now, but anyway...* I suggest NOT taking out the copper spring, but instead just take out the cap from the switch, and with a small brush like I did clean the parts with alcohol instead. I think that in a majority of cases, the problem is not a lack of "spring power" so you'd have to re-shape the spring, but oxidation on the parts. (I noticed the oxidation on several mice who had problems with the switch). Sometimes it can also be dust/hair preventing proper contact. This is my experience. I fixed mice now WITHOUT having to take the copper part out. (I used 96% alcohol like you can get in any drug store).-> soak the brush with alcohol and clean the parts inside instead. At the location of the small plastic switch, push down so the contact opens and also brush in between, or use a paper towel that you soaked with alcohol and clan between the contacts.Wait a minute until the alcohol has evaporated, maybe with a lens check whether there's any hair etc. left, put the cap down again. (Thanks for the tip fixing the white switch with clear tape when you do this).Again: I do not believe you need to take out the spring! Likewise, the copper is so soft that any bending you do will likely not last long anyway, and just the re-assembling of the part, in my experience, bends everything back as it was before. You will end up like before, maybe even worse.

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  • Fixing a Monitor With a Breadmaker: AKA Don't Throw It Out!

    Oh heck yes! Some popular monitors, but also TVs and PC power supplies are notorious for the bulging caps problem. I already repaired plenty of monitors, like the Samsung BBW226 as well as my PC's PSU. In almost any case, the symptoms are that the device doesn't work at all anymore, so normal persons are just throwing them out, or they get quoted insane rates for a repair. When you open up and look at the components, most of the time the bulging caps are obvious. If you don't have an old radio/bread maker with those caps, I mean you can get them on ebay or any electronic vendor. They are pennies, literally. And soldering old caps out and new ones in is relatively easy, even if you're not a pro with a soldering iron. Anyway, yes, be careful, especially with power supplies and TVs.

    My wife is still totally fine with 22" monitors, and the "old" Samsung 226BW is arguably still one of THE best 22" monitors. I buy it all the time when I see one sold on classifieds. It's one of those which is also notorious for the caps going, in this case AFAIK it takes longer and longer until it turns on, until it just stops working. My junk drawer is now full of spare caps.

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