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1Instructables2,134Views85CommentsCouncil Bluffs, IA- that's by Omaha if you live somewhere more appealingJoined February 27th, 2014
Hello! I tinker in many and all things interesting or broken... usually with good results. I have a shop capable of metal and wood working, as well as mechanics (think fixing cars etc.). Currently working on a robot, would love to enter some dev contests especially for DARPA etc... I'm an inventor at heart, looking to get into the prototyping business- see Kickstarter campaign to soon be launched. I've rebuilt 3 motorcycles (2 1977's and an '82, have a 1968 Hemi 426 Roadrunner that my dad le... Read More »

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  • IngenuityAtWork followed kayakdiver3 months ago
      • EASY 3-PERSON CAMPER WITH OUTDOOR KITCHEN & SHOWER, BATHROOM, AND SUNDECK
      • Arduino Controlled Servo Exerciser
      • Arduino Controlled SIP & PUFF Switch
  • IngenuityAtWork commented on Gosse Adema's instructable EL Wire Neon Nixie Style Clock5 months ago
    EL Wire Neon Nixie Style Clock

    Love this! Tip— you could use the ‘minimum load’ 41st EL wire to make a colon to separate the hours and minutes digits, rather than just hiding it in back of the housing. That way, if that piece of EL wire fails, you will notice it and have an opportunity to take corrective action before lack of that minimum load has much time to damage other components. Do you hear the relays clicking on and off? Is it loud enough to be annoying if so?I’m a novice when it comes to electronics, but know enough to follow your instructions and understand what the components do and how they work to contribute to the overall function. So, I like to have clarification from an expert before I change anything about the design when I’m doing my build... hence the question:If I wanted to build this using a mega ...

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    Love this! Tip— you could use the ‘minimum load’ 41st EL wire to make a colon to separate the hours and minutes digits, rather than just hiding it in back of the housing. That way, if that piece of EL wire fails, you will notice it and have an opportunity to take corrective action before lack of that minimum load has much time to damage other components. Do you hear the relays clicking on and off? Is it loud enough to be annoying if so?I’m a novice when it comes to electronics, but know enough to follow your instructions and understand what the components do and how they work to contribute to the overall function. So, I like to have clarification from an expert before I change anything about the design when I’m doing my build... hence the question:If I wanted to build this using a mega and relays, how can I power it all off of one “wall wort”?Thanks!How do you go about setting the clock to the current time? And is it safe to assume that the digits are around 11” tall, since you mentioned using ‘full-size’ and A4 settings when printing the templates?Can you identify any patterns that may be present relating to the length of the EL wires that didn’t switch as expected? I suspect that maybe some sort of “latching” is going on with the triacs once a threshold effect of capacitance is reached with increasing length of EL wire used in a given digit. But maybe I’m reaching a little ways beyond my understanding with that theory :-)Again, thanks for the excellent write-up and any further insights you can provide. I especially appreciate you including the failures and how you adapted to overcome them. Very cool and it’s definitely going on my list of things to build!

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  • BalloonSat Stabilization With Compressed CO2

    It might take some imagination, but consider primers (as used for black powder rifles or in centerfire ammunition) stacked in a thin-walled brass tube, each wired separately with a thin filament of nichromel wire. After the first one is fired, subsequent shots eject the previously spent brass primer body, increasing torque. Exchanging the weight of the CO2 system and all its components, you could probably get much more thrust while dramatically reducing weight, and it can be fired by the same hardware and similar code. Multiple ‘stacked tubes’ on board for CW and CCW would also provide for failsafes in case of failure of a tube. Could also consider pointing the camera down, using a fisheye lense, and using software to stabilize the video after retrieval. I love the glider id...

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    It might take some imagination, but consider primers (as used for black powder rifles or in centerfire ammunition) stacked in a thin-walled brass tube, each wired separately with a thin filament of nichromel wire. After the first one is fired, subsequent shots eject the previously spent brass primer body, increasing torque. Exchanging the weight of the CO2 system and all its components, you could probably get much more thrust while dramatically reducing weight, and it can be fired by the same hardware and similar code. Multiple ‘stacked tubes’ on board for CW and CCW would also provide for failsafes in case of failure of a tube. Could also consider pointing the camera down, using a fisheye lense, and using software to stabilize the video after retrieval. I love the glider idea too to aid in retrieval by attempting to return to the launch point! Could even be possible to build the wings and tail such that they fold into place once the balloon bursts, and seems like you already have everything else on board that would be needed except for a few actuators for flight surfaces. Cool project and clever idea using cheap, off the shelf componentry for the stabilization system! I bet that your gas tubing lost it’s elasticity as it became colder, with the increasing difference in pressure around the gas tube with increasing altitude, ultimately causing the tube to disconnect.

    What if you used your gas to actuate a weighted disc about the Z axis? The gas can do the work of moving your weighted disc, and then still be discharged to contribute to the stabilization.

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  • 10 Woodworking Tricks the Pros Use

    Rubbing fine saw dust into a freshly glued joint is also a good way to hide any gap in the joint. When working with reclaimed wood as I do often, having some polyester resin available to fill in holes etc is a good way to make otherwise unusable material usable and interesting. It’s basically clear pourable plastic if you’re not familiar with it.

    I like to use acid brushes to spread my wood glue. They’re like a dime apiece and disposable yet reusable if you want to. I usually use Titebond 3 wood glue, and spreading it with the brush, it forms a good tacky skin very quickly, which keeps the parts from slipping. When I’m gluing up a panel from strips, I like using brown craft paper to protect my table top. It lets the glue cure, and sands off so quickly with my RO sander that it’s like it isn’t even there. Used to use Saran Wrap, but the glue won’t dry until you can flip your piece over and remove it. Masking tape is also a good way to contain the glue.

    I use masking tape and apply some weight to either side. It has a certain amount of stretch that makes it work well. Rubber bands are also handy and cheap.

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  • Modern Shelving System With NO HARDWARE!!

    It doesn't need to be implied; that's what it means. And this could all be done with non-electric hand tools, with the exception of a small welder (you can get one for less than $100USD at Harbor Freight). I think that "work with what you have" is a principle that proves to eventually have been essential to any successful maker. There is always a better, faster, more efficient, more specialized tool for any particular task, at least from the beginner' perspective, but as a beginner the expense of that equipment isn't practical; that's why the people with the nice shops full of tools know how to use them, and do. And you always appreciate better tools after you've had to cope with building without them. I appreciate my chop saw a great deal after having only a hacksaw and angle...

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    It doesn't need to be implied; that's what it means. And this could all be done with non-electric hand tools, with the exception of a small welder (you can get one for less than $100USD at Harbor Freight). I think that "work with what you have" is a principle that proves to eventually have been essential to any successful maker. There is always a better, faster, more efficient, more specialized tool for any particular task, at least from the beginner' perspective, but as a beginner the expense of that equipment isn't practical; that's why the people with the nice shops full of tools know how to use them, and do. And you always appreciate better tools after you've had to cope with building without them. I appreciate my chop saw a great deal after having only a hacksaw and angle grinder for many years, but there's nothing I can make with my chop saw that I couldn't make with my hacksaw.

    Nice job man, clever design too

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  • IngenuityAtWork commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Unusual Uses for WD-401 year ago
    Unusual Uses for WD-40

    Flame thrower? Hillbilly Mace? I wonder if it can be used as a deicer in a pinch... or if it's viscous evough to seal a worn out valve/valve stem on car wheels. I bet there's lots of clever macguyver-type uses for the straw too.

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  • Fix Broken Plastic! Never Throw It Away Any More!

    Your use of English is clear :-)An excellent way to stop cracks before or after a plastic weld repair, is to drill a hole at the advancing point of the crack. The shearing force will be evenly distributed around the circumference of the circle, instead of at one point in the material.

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  • IngenuityAtWork commented on scooters2's instructable Kristins Teardrop1 year ago
    Kristins Teardrop

    Nice build! That would be perfect for kayakers, could get a couple on the side with the addition of a couple pair of brackets.

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  • IngenuityAtWork commented on BrownDogGadgets's instructable $3 Emergency Solar Radio1 year ago
    $3 Emergency Solar Radio

    I like your sense of humor and your (I assume?) dog. Nice instructible too

    Diodes allow electrons to flow in only one direction. In this case I believe it is to keep the battery from discharging back through the solar panels.

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  • Make a Rain Proof Portable Generator Housing

    Good solution to a very real problem!FYI, at many big box home improvement stores, you can now buy 1/4" thickness 4'x8' HDPE plastic sheets; would be more durable and in my locality it's $40-50/sheet. One could also utilize foil-faced fiberglass board insulation for sound-dampening properties on the interior, and compared to other sound-dampening options like foam board insulation, it should withstand heat better. Could also add the sort of vent that is often used on farm buildings, where the tube exits 90* from vertical and swivels away from the wind direction, to allow for good air intake without scooping in rain at the same time. Could do the same for exhaust.

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  • Automotive Plastic Welding Repair

    Good post; I don't think that most people realize that this can be done. When I go on kayak trips, I carry a cheap butane soldering iron, which works well for thick plastic. Another tip about fillers-- usually there is a spot where you can trim off some excess plastic from the piece you're repairing; this way you get identical filler and don't need to carry any filler.

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  • IngenuityAtWork commented on johnowhite's instructable Hi-top Van Solar Power1 year ago
    Hi-top Van Solar Power

    If you add a start-up capacitor it will handle a compressor just fine.

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  • How to Install Solar Panel(s) on a Camper Van Conversion

    I've used that tape for a variety of things, and I can vouch for its extreme strength. I also understand why you didn't want to penetrate your roof with fasteners. However, now that the sheet metal is sealed by the tape and sealant you applied around it, you could drill through the brackets, tape, and roof to situate a bolt, so you aren't completely reliant on the tape. It's strong, but in your application it will get hot, and heat will weaken the bond.

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  • One-Tree Hammock System, Ultralight

    Nice post!If you carry climbing gear, 8-rings are also really versatile devices for adjusting length and avoid the need for knots. You simply apply tension to the rope, and slide the tag end between the body of the 8 and the top end; the tension will hold it fast, and gravity on the tag end means it doesn't take much tension to hold it in place. Kind of difficult to describe in words; maybe I'll make an instructable about it sometime. By the way, the best hammoc spot I've ever found is up in trees sticking out of lakes. Get there by kayak, string up the hammock, and relax. You should try it sometime :-)

    Also, compliments to your beautiful assistant

    You could certainly use paracord if you want to avoid the comparatively bulky climbing rope.

    The butterfly is also easy to tie one-handed, which is why it's taught to rescue personnel.

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  • Easy Generator to Home Hook Up

    Right but what happens when they show up to repair the connection between your house and the transformer it was connected to before your neighbors tree branch took it out?

    Unless your generator panel has a label for 220 vs 110 and different receptacles for each, it probably only does 110. It would be silly to incur the extra expense to make a generator that can output 220, and then not use it. There are some Y harnesses meant for RV use I believe, but they would be combining the current from your two 110 outlets to make it only require one cord traveling to, and one input receptacle on, the RV.

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  • IngenuityAtWork commented on Wulbert's instructable A Hut on Wheels1 year ago
  • How to Wax Your Clothing and Gear

    You can also dissolve granulated wax in naphtha and apply with a brush. Did this to a canvas roof I made for my hammoc and it worked great! After applying I folded it neatly and tightly and placed in a black garbage bag in the sun, which allowed the mixture to penetrate more deeply than the initial brush application allowed for. The next day I let it dry out on a clothesline in the sun. Don't forget to beware of flames when wearing waxed anything.

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  • IngenuityAtWork commented on velacreations's instructable Cheap and Easy Solar Heater1 year ago
    Cheap and Easy Solar Heater

    Another way to think about it is by considering what happens when you sweat

    The water will evaporate, changing phase from liquid to gas, which requires an input of heat energy. So if you try to heat up rocks that contain water, some of the heat being put into the system will be spent evaporating the water, rather than to contribute directly to increasing the temperature of the rocks.

    For sure. Although I have seen at least a few great Instructibles on trackers. Also had the idea of using fiber optic cable, although I don't know how thick it can be found, to collect the focused light, removing the requirement of precise alignment/positioning for the heat exchanger that the water flows through.

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  • IngenuityAtWork commented on velacreations's instructable Cheap and Easy Solar Heater1 year ago
    Cheap and Easy Solar Heater

    I think the slant is to encourage the air to travel through the heated screen. Had wondered the same thing.

    Rock doesn't phase change in the range of temps produced here. So rather than store heat in the rock, the heat was evaporating the water in the rocks.

    I made a solar concentrator using a fresnel lens... could be a good way to heat water on demand. This is an excellent idea and write-up, and I like that you go the further step of promoting its use and assembly for and in places that need it more than others.

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  • Industrial Style Slide Door

    You can get the hardware by piece that's intended for barns and out-buildings, or as a kit for interior use. From what I've seen the interior kits are much more expensive, have more design constraints, and are less robust.

    All you really need is a way to cut 90 and 45-degree angles in wood and a drill. You can buy steel in the lengths you need or cut it with a hacksaw, and use glue to hold the door together instead of the custom made corner braces. A vice and a hammer bends the hanger steel pieces just fine, or can modify the design not to need the hangers to be bent.

    Nice build!I often start projects with a piece of wood or steel and find a use for it. I build with reclaimed hardwood from an old barn and steel from a salvage company. Saves me a lot of money so I can buy nice tools :-)

    He started by finding a couple pieces of scrap ply and wanted to find a use for them. That's how a lot of my best projects start! With the steel, rollers, and 2x4's, he probably spent less than 20 dollars on this, maybe 1/3 of what just a roller/hanger kit costs.

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  • How to Make a Dehumidifier (Thermoelectric Cooling)

    Your comment gave me an interesting thought about the efficiency. If there was a means employed to to take advantage of the "waste" heat, for instance to heat water, then it would become much more useful from an efficiency perspective. I wonder if they make larger Peltier modules, and if scaling up the module would require an increased voltage vs. current. Maybe it would be practical to have a solar-powered unit that collects and heats water for human use for hygiene and cooking. Even if paired with a standard water heater, if the temperature of the incoming supply was increased, it would save on energy that the water heater has to expend.

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  • IngenuityAtWork commented on ben maisel's instructable Backpacking Tips and Tricks2 years ago
    Backpacking Tips and Tricks

    Also, I love using my hammock, an ENO DoubleNest I think, when a tent isn't completely necessary. I made a waterproof roof from canvas and a waterproofing mixture of naptha (ie, Zippo fluid) and granulated paraffin wax. I leave my foam ground pad and sleeping bag in the hammock, and the roof doubles as a pack roll for it all. So I can set up and take down all of it in a few minutes, and don't have to worry about wet ground. Believe it or not, it's as warm as my tent. Also purified natural water is the best I've ever had, no chemicals needed with my SweetWater filter that I've had for over a decade. Well worth the cost and I've replaced the element one time.

    Nice tips Ben!A couple things I've found useful too: I swap my stock shoelaces for paracord, and keep a small container of small essentials-- compass, paracord, knife, flashlight, lighter, candle, meds, etc.-- on you at all times, wearing it as though it was a piece of your usual vlothing. It comes in handy when you want I venture out a little farther (and farther) from camp as dusk approaches, and provides some extra security in case you're separated from the bulk of your gear by choice or circumstances. I find that a surplus M16 mag pouch worn on my belt works well and I don't even notice that it's there. Also since most of my adventuring is done via kayak, it's very practical to have that one small piece of gear that can get my by, to focus on grabbing if I ever sink my boat or get d...

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    Nice tips Ben!A couple things I've found useful too: I swap my stock shoelaces for paracord, and keep a small container of small essentials-- compass, paracord, knife, flashlight, lighter, candle, meds, etc.-- on you at all times, wearing it as though it was a piece of your usual vlothing. It comes in handy when you want I venture out a little farther (and farther) from camp as dusk approaches, and provides some extra security in case you're separated from the bulk of your gear by choice or circumstances. I find that a surplus M16 mag pouch worn on my belt works well and I don't even notice that it's there. Also since most of my adventuring is done via kayak, it's very practical to have that one small piece of gear that can get my by, to focus on grabbing if I ever sink my boat or get dumped in current.

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  • From Old Motors Into Signal Booster

    Don't let them get you down man, I think it's cool and demonstrates some good qualities on your behalf that you tried to solve a problem. Also, annealing the copper wire after making the coils would reduce the internal stress in the wire which resulted from the bending. I don't remember the physics lesson regarding how current flows across a bent wire, but doing so probably decreases the coil's resistance to some degree, even if only by an insignificant amount.

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