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  • Solar Powered WiFi Weather Station V2.0

    Overall really nicely written project. I will be referring back to this one when I build mine.Please note, though, that the TP4056 charging circuit does NOT protect from undervoltage. It only charges. The Left half of the board you pictured is the charging circuitry. There are several variants of the TP4056 based chargers available.The overdischarge protection is the Right half of the board, and is controlled via the DW01 IC. This chip solely controls the protection aspect of the board.Perhaps you should mention that there are different version with this this charging chip and to make sure to get the right one, with the protection circuitry.Also, for those who don't know, there are a lot of TP4056 fake chips out there. They overheat during charging, even under 500mA charge. There is a n...

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    Overall really nicely written project. I will be referring back to this one when I build mine.Please note, though, that the TP4056 charging circuit does NOT protect from undervoltage. It only charges. The Left half of the board you pictured is the charging circuitry. There are several variants of the TP4056 based chargers available.The overdischarge protection is the Right half of the board, and is controlled via the DW01 IC. This chip solely controls the protection aspect of the board.Perhaps you should mention that there are different version with this this charging chip and to make sure to get the right one, with the protection circuitry.Also, for those who don't know, there are a lot of TP4056 fake chips out there. They overheat during charging, even under 500mA charge. There is a new IC that replaces it, and it's called the TP5100, which currently there aren't any, or very few, fakes out there. And it can take an input voltage up to 20V, I believe. It can also charge 2 cells in series efficiently.

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  • DIY Doggie Septic System With Natural Starter

    I've actually been considering something similar to this. But mine was going to tie into my existing septic system (which is custom as well). I'm wanting to set it up so that my two dogs (9yr Siberian Husky and 1yr Anatolian) can use the "toilet" while I'm gone at work. When I get back, they are whimpering cuz they need to go out. I figured to make a type of dog run that had a toilet section where they could go and then I could just wash it with the hose when I get home (maybe make that automated as I'm getting into arduinos and such).And to make a full sized fenced in area would cost me waaay to much right now. Both dogs can jump 5' without a problem. So the dog run would need a top on it, which again, adds to the cost, and also adds complexity as it needs to be sturdy enough...

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    I've actually been considering something similar to this. But mine was going to tie into my existing septic system (which is custom as well). I'm wanting to set it up so that my two dogs (9yr Siberian Husky and 1yr Anatolian) can use the "toilet" while I'm gone at work. When I get back, they are whimpering cuz they need to go out. I figured to make a type of dog run that had a toilet section where they could go and then I could just wash it with the hose when I get home (maybe make that automated as I'm getting into arduinos and such).And to make a full sized fenced in area would cost me waaay to much right now. Both dogs can jump 5' without a problem. So the dog run would need a top on it, which again, adds to the cost, and also adds complexity as it needs to be sturdy enough to not collapse.Thanks for the idea. I hadn't thought of the yeast/cornmeal before. Great idea!

    To help keep the dirt from getting into the bucket, I would suggest adding another lay of material.After digging out the hole, line it with septic mesh material. It is designed to keep dirt out, and let water through. Line the hole with the mesh, then put a few rocks at the bottom. Place the bucket on those rocks, then fill around the bucket with more rocks to just under ground level. Then fold the mesh over the rocks to the bucket, cut about 2 inches from above the rocks and tape the mesh to the edge of the bucket going up a little. Fill the rest in with dirt, That way the rocks are hidden, any possible over flow from dropping droppings into the bucket won't come wafting out. Also after a heavy rain, you don't have to worry about your bucket getting filled in with mud as the mesh will ...

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    To help keep the dirt from getting into the bucket, I would suggest adding another lay of material.After digging out the hole, line it with septic mesh material. It is designed to keep dirt out, and let water through. Line the hole with the mesh, then put a few rocks at the bottom. Place the bucket on those rocks, then fill around the bucket with more rocks to just under ground level. Then fold the mesh over the rocks to the bucket, cut about 2 inches from above the rocks and tape the mesh to the edge of the bucket going up a little. Fill the rest in with dirt, That way the rocks are hidden, any possible over flow from dropping droppings into the bucket won't come wafting out. Also after a heavy rain, you don't have to worry about your bucket getting filled in with mud as the mesh will keep it out.

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  • DIY Grid Tied Inverter (doesn't Feed the Grid) UPS Alternative

    $200/355W panels is a pretty good price. That's $0.56/Watt, and about average pricing. A good inverter can be bought for about $1000, depending on power output needed. AIMS is a good inverter. There are lots of inverters that "look" like an AIMS with different color/badging. Internally it is the same and will run the same, just different distributer. A lot of inverters are done this way.The Batteries should be deep cycle marine grade type batteries. They can last 5+ years if treated properly and only use 50% DOD. If using lithium batteries, then about 70% DOD can be achieved and life can practically be doubled and they don't cost that much more (even cheaper if you recycle cells; look at the 'diy powerwall' community for an example).There will always be maintenance. Replacing...

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    $200/355W panels is a pretty good price. That's $0.56/Watt, and about average pricing. A good inverter can be bought for about $1000, depending on power output needed. AIMS is a good inverter. There are lots of inverters that "look" like an AIMS with different color/badging. Internally it is the same and will run the same, just different distributer. A lot of inverters are done this way.The Batteries should be deep cycle marine grade type batteries. They can last 5+ years if treated properly and only use 50% DOD. If using lithium batteries, then about 70% DOD can be achieved and life can practically be doubled and they don't cost that much more (even cheaper if you recycle cells; look at the 'diy powerwall' community for an example).There will always be maintenance. Replacing the batteries at some point will be that. But in the end, the maintenance will always be cheaper than the grid.Depending on where you live will depend on return on investment. I live in Florida, and I have one of the cheapest power in the state at $.13/kWh. I pay out about $120/month. If I build a system that costs $3000, then it'll take about 25 months to get my return; which is actually a really good return. Even if I had to do $5000 system, that's 42 months. Still not bad as long as I am producing enough power.The energy is free, the work to collect it and transform it into something usable is not ;)Korishansecondlifestorage.com

    Good points. I agree. Also the AIMS power line is a good inverter as well. The Sigineer Power inverter is also good. It's basically the AIMS wrapped in another package. There are a few others, but I can't remember who they are.andytechdude, check out HBPowerwall. He's near Brisbane, if I remember correctly. SecondLifeStorage.com is his forum and there's lots of us there working on lithium based battery storage. Smaller, lighter, more energy dense, and cheaper to maintain in the long run.

    Yes, these are referred to as Hybrid Inverters. And they are expensive! The micro-inverters will allow for small loads. Basically if you house uses 12kWh, and your micro-inverter can output 5kWh, then you are only pulling 7kWh from the grid. They match between load and their max output. With inverters, using close to 80-90% of their capacity makes them the most efficient

    The ATS is that relay. When there is grid power, the ATS is on grid, when the grid goes down, the ATS switches over to solar. You can also make this more dependent on loads, too. So if you have 1kWh of solar, and your loads are light, then you could run on solar. When the load goes up and over loads the solar feed, it'd switch over to grid to handle the higher load until the load drops back down. But that takes using some smart programming/switching and such.This system doesn't feed power pack into the grid. This isn't grid-tied. This is basically a large battery backup UPS. The ATS is required to make sure the inverter doesn't feed back to the grid and it disconnects all 3 wires (Hot, Hot, Neutral/Ground) from the grid.

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  • Add Wireless Charging to Any Phone: Using the LG-V20 As Example

    From the stackexchange link you provide: "Even connecting two power supplies of the SAME voltage together is not typically recommended because here in the Real World, they are never EXACTLY the same voltage. Ways around this include using diodes to isolate the power supplies from each other. Or using low-value resistors to provide a "buffer" between each supply and the load."And from quora link: "by using diode gating several otherwise unsuitable power supplies can be paralleled, for redundancy if not load sharing. The one with the fractionally highest voltage will back-bias the other diodes, and take the lion’s share of the load"Sooooo, as I said, "DIODES" would protect both the charging coil and the USB power supply.

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