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  • LoRa IOT Home Environment Monitoring System

    Hi Vasko,Since writing this Instructable I added a layer of ten battery operated sensors using low cost 433-MHz link transmitters ($4.95 each at Sparkfun) and a bridge/repeater that rebroadcasts the 433-MHz link transmitters sensor information over a LoRa link to LoRa IOT Gateway. For the IOT Gateway I wanted to make sure I had enough memory to support current and future features. The focus with the Remote Units was more about cost. I actually concluded that LoRa was overkill for sensors within a home. Using the simple battery operated 433-MHz link transmitters and a centrally located 433-MHz to LoRa relay works very well in a house. The battery operated sensors use 3 x AA batteries and have been running for well over a year on a single set of batteries.There are many ways to implement ...

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    Hi Vasko,Since writing this Instructable I added a layer of ten battery operated sensors using low cost 433-MHz link transmitters ($4.95 each at Sparkfun) and a bridge/repeater that rebroadcasts the 433-MHz link transmitters sensor information over a LoRa link to LoRa IOT Gateway. For the IOT Gateway I wanted to make sure I had enough memory to support current and future features. The focus with the Remote Units was more about cost. I actually concluded that LoRa was overkill for sensors within a home. Using the simple battery operated 433-MHz link transmitters and a centrally located 433-MHz to LoRa relay works very well in a house. The battery operated sensors use 3 x AA batteries and have been running for well over a year on a single set of batteries.There are many ways to implement systems such as this, it just depends on what's available at the time you are designing and your priorities.Regards,Rod

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  • LoRa IOT Home Environment Monitoring System

    Hi Bas,#include<RH_RF95.h>It's in the Lora Gateway code. https://github.com/RodNewHampshire/LoRa-IOT-Home-E...Regards,Rod

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  • LoRa IOT Home Environment Monitoring System

    Thanks for the feedback! I have two more remote stations that I am working on before I could consider a control application for the system.The first remote is an inductive loop vehicle detector. As we tend to have longer driveways in New Hampshire and lots of trees, this is a high-priority for me.The second remote is a low cost, low power battery operated water and humidity sensor that could be placed in kitchen and bathroom cabinets with water fixtures, and generally anywhere water could be an issue.

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    • LoRa IOT Home Environment Monitoring System
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  • LoRa IOT Home Environment Monitoring System

    Thanks for the feedback! Roughly speaking, the IOT Gateway ~$200, each of the Indoor Stations $50, and the Outdoor Station ~$175 including the solar radiation shield.

    Thanks for the feedback, appreciate it!

    Keep in mind my objectives for the project:Create a home IOT gateway Minimum Viable Product (MVP)Create a User Interface (UI) framework for Arduino projectsAssess suitability of LoRa technology for the home environmentIt's a proof of concept device.

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  • RodNewHampshire followed Raspberry Pi, Sensors, Wireless, Arduino and 1 other channel 1 year ago
  • LoRa IOT Home Environment Monitoring System

    Thanks for the feedback and the vote! A rotary encoder could be used in place of the UP/DOWN push button switches, but would require more front panel area. It's already a tight fit for the LCD and two sets of push button switches on either side. The UP/DOWN buttons are only used during configuration, and the only laborious task is editing the station names using the UP/DOWN buttons to cycle through the characters.I used rotary encoders on this project www.expressreceiver.com for the Main Tuning and RF Gain control. I haven't looked into an Arduino library for shaft encoders, however, the code is not that complex. A shaft encoder requires two digital inputs with interrupts enabled, an Interrupt Service Routine to determine which way the shaft is rotating, and then take some simple action...

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    Thanks for the feedback and the vote! A rotary encoder could be used in place of the UP/DOWN push button switches, but would require more front panel area. It's already a tight fit for the LCD and two sets of push button switches on either side. The UP/DOWN buttons are only used during configuration, and the only laborious task is editing the station names using the UP/DOWN buttons to cycle through the characters.I used rotary encoders on this project www.expressreceiver.com for the Main Tuning and RF Gain control. I haven't looked into an Arduino library for shaft encoders, however, the code is not that complex. A shaft encoder requires two digital inputs with interrupts enabled, an Interrupt Service Routine to determine which way the shaft is rotating, and then take some simple action in the ISR, such as increment / decrement a counter, before exiting the ISR. If you look at the Express Receiver Software page, Main Display & Control Board the Main Tuning optical shaft encoder ISR is in main.c.

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  • LoRa IOT Home Environment Monitoring System

    Craig, thanks for the feedback. The enclosure is from QRP Labs, you can find ordering information here: http://shop.qrp-labs.com/custombox

    Thanks for the feedback! Rather than using the DS18B20 Temperature Sensor (Sparkfun SKU SEN-11050) to monitor ground temperature you could extend it to the spa. This sensor is waterproof and rated to 125C (257F). I would make sure the outdoor station is installed away from the spa if you want accurate outdoor temperature and humidity readings.

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