Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile
  • PWM Regulated Fan Based on CPU Temperature for Raspberry Pi

    You don't need to. All command lines in rc.local run as superuser.

    I think it's cleaner and neater how the OP did it. This allows you to add a single hash character to the command line in /etc/rc.local instead of adding multiple ones to disable the command. It's a time saver and gives a tidier system. You can also edit the single config file without tampering with other settings, and enables non-root users to modify it as well.On the downside, being GNU/Linux an operating system with a f**kton of config files scattered everywhere, this adds yet another one of them, so you could easily lose track of it if you accidentally move it elsewhere. Moreover, you get the same problems with the non-root user access, because this configuration could break the principle of minimal privilege if mishandled. By incorporating the code in /etc/rc.local this issue is avo...

    see more »

    I think it's cleaner and neater how the OP did it. This allows you to add a single hash character to the command line in /etc/rc.local instead of adding multiple ones to disable the command. It's a time saver and gives a tidier system. You can also edit the single config file without tampering with other settings, and enables non-root users to modify it as well.On the downside, being GNU/Linux an operating system with a f**kton of config files scattered everywhere, this adds yet another one of them, so you could easily lose track of it if you accidentally move it elsewhere. Moreover, you get the same problems with the non-root user access, because this configuration could break the principle of minimal privilege if mishandled. By incorporating the code in /etc/rc.local this issue is avoided.

    View Instructable »
  • PWM Regulated Fan Based on CPU Temperature for Raspberry Pi

    It wouldn't, as long as the PSU can provide enough current to the fan. 100mA is a relatively low current for a fan (old PS3 systems had a 2,650mA 12V fan for example) but if your PSU can power up a 200mA fan it surely can power up a 100mA one.

    View Instructable »
  • Control a Cooling Fan on a Raspberry Pi 3

    From Raspbian 4.4 (AFAIK) the gpio-fan overlay was added to the device tree. When using a raspberry pi 3 model B, I just have to add the following lines in /boot/config.txt:dtoverlay=gpio-fandtparam=gpiopin=<#>dtparam=temp=<millicelsius>gpiopin is the GPIO pin (BCM value!) used as the output signal (default 12); temp is the minimum temperature in millicelsius at which the GPIO pin activates (default 55000). The hardware configuration suggested in the instructable remains the same.A python instance controlling the GPIO might as well be considered a factor that heats up the Raspberry in the first place; the instance may eat 100% of a single core, heating the Broadcom way past 60°C by itself with no further load. And yes, with the proper passive heatsink and standard clocking (...

    see more »

    From Raspbian 4.4 (AFAIK) the gpio-fan overlay was added to the device tree. When using a raspberry pi 3 model B, I just have to add the following lines in /boot/config.txt:dtoverlay=gpio-fandtparam=gpiopin=<#>dtparam=temp=<millicelsius>gpiopin is the GPIO pin (BCM value!) used as the output signal (default 12); temp is the minimum temperature in millicelsius at which the GPIO pin activates (default 55000). The hardware configuration suggested in the instructable remains the same.A python instance controlling the GPIO might as well be considered a factor that heats up the Raspberry in the first place; the instance may eat 100% of a single core, heating the Broadcom way past 60°C by itself with no further load. And yes, with the proper passive heatsink and standard clocking (and wise programming) the Raspberry does not heat up past 55-60°C, even under heavy load, without Python scripts leeching in the background. That's why I usually try to avoid Python scripts; they might be considered both a pathogen and a palliative.

    View Instructable »
  • WalterC77 commented on AndrewH7's instructable Simple Raspberry Pi Shutdown Button4 months ago
    Simple Raspberry Pi Shutdown Button

    Unfortunately, this seems to put quite a strain on the system, because a Python instance must run in the background all the time to keep the pin monitored. I've tested it myself and when reading processes with top it shows a 100% usage of a single core (using a quad-core Rapspberry Pi 3 model B) and 50,5°C of temperature. Disabling the process (sudo pkill python) not only releases the core but decreases the temperature to about 45°C.Given this, in my opinion a kernel module should be built instead. It would have to handle the thing in a much tidier way. This Python solution should be used only if there is no alternative.

    View Instructable »