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  • Wild-Bill commented on barclay5426's instructable Hand Carved Door Pulls22 days ago
    Hand Carved Door Pulls

    Of your kitchen cabinet project I have to admit I love those pulls the best. You have solved one of the biggest problems, uniformity, by saying it will be in style. Your are not just a master cabinet maker but you are also an artist. Those pulls are beautifully right brained and you have the technical skills to bring it to fruition.

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  • Microcement Worktops for a Bespoke Kitchen

    The Microcement is "Meh" compared to the end result. You are a Master Cabinet Maker, if you don't have that designation, then you deserve it. Your design of that fitted kitchen in that space is totally amazing. The way you work with hand tool is mesmerising. Your effective use of power tools was refreshing. The end result in fit and finish is stunning. I am going to have add a router plane or a plow plane to my kit.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on Haunted Spider's instructable Open Kitchen Pantry2 months ago
    Open Kitchen Pantry

    I love the vertical drawer. I did a pantry with a bunch of them mind you mine were only accessible from one side and I installed mine in an already made pantry cabinet.

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  • Foot Activated Opposable Thumb Third Hand Clamping Device

    From a cyclist who likes to dabble in electronics, I totally love your project. I just have to find that clincher brake I replaced with a disk a few years back.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on Make_Things's instructable Table Saw Blade Gauge2 months ago
    Table Saw Blade Gauge

    You make beautiful tools and I love the precision of your work but the way you use a table saw totally freaks me out. You need to make yourself a push stick. It also sets a very bad example for beginning woodworkers out there.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on quintaar's instructable USBerry PI - USB Rasberry Pi Zero(W)2 months ago
    USBerry PI - USB Rasberry Pi Zero(W)

    I am a real fan of the raspberry PI Zero W, for hardware interface control projects because so easy to create a user interface just by to connect to it over WiFi which I can easily use my phone and if I was feeling a bit insane I could backbone it on the Internet across VPN, that of course would be total overkill for controlling an espresso machine.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on fretters's instructable Computer Drawer4 months ago
    Computer Drawer

    I love your Idea. I have always struggled with computer boxes. I have one that I really like in that it goes a great job of keeping dust out of the case as well as keeping everything cool. I thought it had a rack mounted attachment but it turned out the loaded box wasn't strong enough to hang off a 19" rack. I might mount some long drawer slides on it. Thanks for the idea.

    Hi FrettersYou miss understand. What I was trying to express and I guess I did so poorly, is that as my box was (poorly) designed as a 19 inch rack box but is a good box would work with long drawer slides attached to it. It opens from the top very unlike a lot of PC boxes. I think I might have some 24" slides in my shop. I stripped the this box and am currently using some of the guts in another another box. The MB in this box is fried. Those screens in front of the fans collect a lot of the dust and they are easy to remove and clean. I had built a shelf under my desk but it was a real pain to use because it did not give easy access to the back side of the unit. With drawer slides the problem will be solved. Thanks again.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on AdventuresInJunkLand's instructable Fix Up an Old Laptop!4 months ago
    Fix Up an Old Laptop!

    Future proof yourself. If I push data I want USB 3. If I buy a thumb drive I buy USB 3. My last laptop that I had and gave away had USB 3. My current box (an old gamers machine) I added a USB 3 card. I USB 3 like hard drives, thumb drives etc. but I also use it with a sound digitizer (USB 2) and push big data without the worry of sharing band width with other USB devices.

    Chances are about 99%, because I know nothing about your 'puter, and I did encountered a Chrome Book what had an SSD at chip level wired in. Beyond that if it is even a marginally new (which by your standard is really old) it most likely has an Sata drive. These multi interfaces (SATA and ATA/IDE) are fairly cheap - you just have to be more careful handling the drive. Thermaltake comes with rubber like drive covers for both 3.5 & 2.5 drives but it is only SATA. If get the multi-interfaces one get it with USB 3 as it is so much faster.

    I have two different types of USB - Harddrive attachments. One very similar to Thermaltake ST0005U-C I plug my harddrives into, unfortunately it only handles SATA format. I have on really old one that handles both SATA and ATA/IDE. It doesn't look like much as it is just a bunch of cables and connectors. I have unfortunately broken the SATA power plug. The Thermaltake is slick and handles both 3.5 and 2.5 drives. I would have shown a picture of my Thermaltake but I cleaned up my office and I have no idea were I put it. If you go on AMAZON you should be able to find something that will do the job.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on AdventuresInJunkLand's instructable Fix Up an Old Laptop!4 months ago
    Fix Up an Old Laptop!

    Ya just remove the hard drive and using a usb device, connect it up to another computer and down load the files on the drive. I have one for Sata and another for ATA drives. It should be no problem finding a USB Sata interface but the ATA might be a bit more difficult. The most common failure is the power supply which are really hard to find a replace.

    I fix up old computers all the time. I did a really old one with Lubuntu 32bit. I had to fuss a bit to get it running well. I replaced a fellows laptop OS with Linux as he was having so much trouble with Windows. I set him up on Linux and now he is happy as he can be. My current machine is a rescue. It was an old non-running gaming machine and now it smokes and can push 4 monitors. I put on the latest Ubuntu - I am not loving it but works well. I am a bit disappointed that Ubuntu is dropping support for 32bit. It is not a big deal as I can always go back and use Debian. Oh, I have piles of parts. I through out a bunch of smaller ATA hard drives because I never thought I would use them again (decommissioned them with a a couple of whacks of a hammer). You need to find someone like me who...

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    I fix up old computers all the time. I did a really old one with Lubuntu 32bit. I had to fuss a bit to get it running well. I replaced a fellows laptop OS with Linux as he was having so much trouble with Windows. I set him up on Linux and now he is happy as he can be. My current machine is a rescue. It was an old non-running gaming machine and now it smokes and can push 4 monitors. I put on the latest Ubuntu - I am not loving it but works well. I am a bit disappointed that Ubuntu is dropping support for 32bit. It is not a big deal as I can always go back and use Debian. Oh, I have piles of parts. I through out a bunch of smaller ATA hard drives because I never thought I would use them again (decommissioned them with a a couple of whacks of a hammer). You need to find someone like me who have piles of parts. Ya I give them away. The last machine I bought new was a super nice little laptop that had a design problem and it was being sold off cheap. Before I bought it, I went out on line and found a couple of people who figured out how to fix the problem. I had it for about a year and I gave it to friend's daughter who need a laptop for college. Older box type computers are easier to work on as they come apart easily but laptops can be a bit tricky to tear down especially if they have hidden clips. I spent most of my working life dealing with computers from very small to very large and in my opinion Lenovo and IBM pc/laptops are some of the nicest computers designed to be worked on. So, have no fear!

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  • Homemade Tin Can Turbine With 3d-printed Compressor

    I would call it the Instructable project of the Year. When I was a child I was fascinated by jet engines and read about them but believed I would never be able to build one. What you have built there is really scary but totally brilliant. I like the way you sited your information. Your minimalist approach is what makes this a truly fantastic instructable, NO I am not going to build it.

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  • How to Make a SOFA That Turns Into a BED

    I like your project but I totally love the sand paper clamping trick.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on jenfoxbot's instructable A Beginner's Guide to Microcontrollers4 months ago
    A Beginner's Guide to Microcontrollers

    I am an old fart (70) who has been messing around with Pi from when they were first available. Yes I was one of the first to order the original Pi. I have now been looking at the Arduino (robust hardware interface projects) and Micro:Bit (for a local community maker shop class). Thanks for doing this presentation.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on In The Kitchen With Matt's instructable Amazing Pizza Sauce5 months ago
    Amazing Pizza Sauce

    I figured out in my life that it is worth buying the best food I can afford and that is probably why I use Sun Dried Tomatoes in my pizza sauce, or should I say pesto, as they are grown until they a ripe with a really lovely intense flavour. I also grow and sometimes can my own tomatoes which are as good if not better than canned tomatoes from Italy. I purchase Organic Italian canned tomatoes for less than 3 times what I would pay for the same brand with canned Canadian tomatoes. There is a import store in the next town that sells San Marzano canned tomatoes, if I remember correctly, at close to $6cnd a can. No, I have never purchased them. I started using Italian canned tomatoes when someone pointed out to me how much more salt is used in Canadian canned tomatoes. When I cook with th...

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    I figured out in my life that it is worth buying the best food I can afford and that is probably why I use Sun Dried Tomatoes in my pizza sauce, or should I say pesto, as they are grown until they a ripe with a really lovely intense flavour. I also grow and sometimes can my own tomatoes which are as good if not better than canned tomatoes from Italy. I purchase Organic Italian canned tomatoes for less than 3 times what I would pay for the same brand with canned Canadian tomatoes. There is a import store in the next town that sells San Marzano canned tomatoes, if I remember correctly, at close to $6cnd a can. No, I have never purchased them. I started using Italian canned tomatoes when someone pointed out to me how much more salt is used in Canadian canned tomatoes. When I cook with them, I feel, Italian canned tomatoes really makes a difference in the end product. Cheers.

    When it comes to canned Tomatoes, if it doesn't come from Italy then it is packed with salt, I believe, in the attempt to be other than tasteless. In Canada they are not hard to find but they are much more expensive. I use sun dried tomatoes in my pizza sauce which rightfully would be called Sun Dried Tomato-Walnut Pesto with Italian tomato paste for colour an Chipotle for zing and generous amount of garlic for savoury.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on CalebB57's instructable Automatic Coffee Notification System5 months ago
    Automatic Coffee Notification System

    You got me at Raspberry Pi and coffee.

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  • Cleaning a Bicycle Chain With "Eternal" Kerosene.  (Includes the Kerosene Recycling Stand)

    I started by using Finish Line and am currently using a product called White Lightning, but now Bar Oil, is a incredibly inexpensive way to lubricate a chain. I saw an instructable for making Wax lubricant but I haven't tried it. My bike chains last me about 4,000km via a chain wear gauge. I have gone longer but then I start wearing out sprockets and chain rings.

    I totally agree kerosene does a very brilliant job cleaning bike chain and I would reuse it in a similar way. I haven't seen or used that chain cleaner. I had one and it eventually failed so I used a chain break and put the chain in a yogurt container with the kerosene and shake it up. You are right to wear barrier gloves which I didn't take precautions in those days. It never even dawned on me to use Bar Oil. This such a great and inexpensive way to maintain a bike chain. I now use wax based lubricants which illuminates the need to clean my chain. Ya, they are kind of expensive but I cycle tour and the less stuff I carry the better.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on AdventuresInJunkLand's instructable Fix Up an Old Laptop!7 months ago
    Fix Up an Old Laptop!

    I have resurrected a few old laptops and PCs. I just did a IBM ThinkCentre running a late generation P4 with 1M of ram and a 80GB drive. I really like those machines as they are so elegantly built. It was running XP but it had been totally hacked. And I got it up and running with Lubuntu i386 18.04. I had one software issue with LibreOffice but I found the solution on line. Warning the default installs do not create a Swap Partition on the harddrive, and these older machines really need a Swap Partition for memory management. All my Linux installs have a Swap Partition. It is possible to make your own replacement laptop batteries but would not recommend as some of the highly capable batteries can explosive or catch fire.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on jprussack's instructable Backyard Pizza8 months ago
    Backyard Pizza

    On the Great "Pizza Stone vs Baking Sheet" controversy, my I suggest that one use, what are called, Field Tiles. They are unglazed fired clay tiles possibly available at your tile speciality store. They are dirt cheap, easy to store and they make fantastic pizza. I make pizza all the time, as it is so easy. I hope you Instructable gets more people to give making their own pizza a try.

    The tires I have are 8"x8" 3/8" thick with some ribbing on the back and a terracotta colour. I just butt 4 of them together on an oven rack. I cannot see why granite wouldn't work. I include a QAD picture with my webcam of one tile which has developed a interesting patina over the years.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on toymakerlabs's instructable Cast Iron Skillet Pizza9 months ago
    Cast Iron Skillet Pizza

    The presentation got me to look at your pizza instructable. It looks absolutely delicious. I do all my pizza from scratch. Making your own Pizza dough is nothing the only thing I do out of the ordinary is add course ground garlic powder. Pizza sauce is a bit more effort than opening can but I cheat and make what I call Sun Dried Tomato Walnut Pesto with Chipotle, and this includes lots of garlic, olive oil and some tomato paste for colour. I always make a lot when I do and keep the unused portion in the freezer. Some times I don't use sauce at all but truffle oil especially when I do my Forager Pizza which has wild mushrooms (when I don't have any wild mushrooms I use Shiitake mushrooms), garlic, goats feta and provolone. I cook my Pizzas on unglazed tiles (which I bought from a local t...

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    The presentation got me to look at your pizza instructable. It looks absolutely delicious. I do all my pizza from scratch. Making your own Pizza dough is nothing the only thing I do out of the ordinary is add course ground garlic powder. Pizza sauce is a bit more effort than opening can but I cheat and make what I call Sun Dried Tomato Walnut Pesto with Chipotle, and this includes lots of garlic, olive oil and some tomato paste for colour. I always make a lot when I do and keep the unused portion in the freezer. Some times I don't use sauce at all but truffle oil especially when I do my Forager Pizza which has wild mushrooms (when I don't have any wild mushrooms I use Shiitake mushrooms), garlic, goats feta and provolone. I cook my Pizzas on unglazed tiles (which I bought from a local tile store) and I made a Pizza Peel (Pizza paddle) out of a scrape of 3/8" plywood. The pizza shown below I call a my Three Cheese Haggis Pizza and that is the Peel I made in about 15 minutes about 10 years ago. I was so impressed by the look of your pizza I decided to throw a couple of these ideas at you so you can up your game.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on tjaap's instructable Literary Clock Made From E-reader9 months ago
    Literary Clock Made From E-reader

    I love the idea of a clock expressing time as a series of quotes. I am going to run with. Thanks

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  • Wild-Bill commented on IJustLikeMakingThings's instructable Ultimate Guide to Cheesecake11 months ago
    Ultimate Guide to Cheesecake

    I like your approach just varying one variable. I have an exception that you probably missed because it is totally radical and that is to not use any cream cheese. I took a vegetarian cooking course many years ago and we made vegan cheese cake. I use to make it and take it to work occasionally. It was delicious and I gave many copies of the recipe away. I misplaced the the recipe about twenty years ago so I haven't made it since. It was based on Tofu and Oil to get the right consistency.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on JettaKnight's instructable Cast Concrete Bench1 year ago
    Cast Concrete Bench

    It is a good rock solid project and a good Instructable. Except for being messy and heavy, I too really like working with concrete. Bubbles are always a problem even with a proper concrete agitator but I found using a grinder or course polisher and use a slurry and fill them and I go over the top and expose the aggregate and polish it (now that is messy) to a gloss. With the concrete with some black colourant and some light coloured aggregate like Dolomite, the end result looking like granite. Your Instructable, I believe, will get people out there building some amazing things.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on deluges's instructable How to Make an Acoustic Guitar1 year ago
    How to Make an Acoustic Guitar

    Your instructable is inspiring. It is not that I would want to build a guitar but with dedication and the willing to learn one can accomplish anything. Thank you.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on makendo's instructable Cabinet Spice Rack1 year ago
    Cabinet Spice Rack

    You solved the problem quite elegantly. Typical shelving just does not work right as stuff gets buried behind other stuff and one cannot find anything. I never though about it until a friend who made a suggestion when I was planning a major house renovation which included the kitchen and that was to make a floor to ceiling cabinet where the shelves were only 4 inches deep. I didn't use that idea but I put pull outs with shelves in my cabinets that were only as deep as they need to be. The density it super high and nothing get buried. Not as elegant as your solution but it works.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on Woodness Goodness's instructable Modern Media Console1 year ago
    Modern Media Console

    I wouldn't have built it that way (I don't work with metal) but I love your design - it is super elegant.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on jkratman's instructable Pallet Adirondack Chair1 year ago
    Pallet Adirondack Chair

    I have never tried to build an of Adirondack chair out of pallet wood but I did build a couple from "1 by" fir shiplap sheathing that came off of my old house during a renovation and some fir "2 by" that I had left over. I didn't use plans except the design in my head (i got into a bit of a bother making the second chair for my wife but fixed it). It was a lot of fun and challenging trying to measure anything anatomically. Some curves I drew by hand and others with a string compass. My next one will be mostly of pallet wood thanks for you insanely detailed Instructable as it got me to read it and it inspired me to give it a try.

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  • Raspberry Pi Presentation Machine With Remote Control

    Thank you, Thank you. You have presented solutions to two problems for several of my Raspberry Pi projects. Your remote control solution is way more elegant and functional than using a Flirc and I am going to have to give it a try. I will try to adapt it for my WiFi HiFi NFS media player attached to my stereo as the Flirc can only do single keystrokes. I have been thinking of adding a battery pack to a couple of Raspberry PI projects (car computer and a several remote sensors).

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  • Wild-Bill commented on MartinD_CZ's instructable Lithium Battery Utility Board1 year ago
    Lithium Battery Utility Board

    From all the crazies, innovators, and thinkers out there, I sincerely thank you for your instructable. When it comes to electronics, I typically clobber things together and then try to smooth out the corners by using software, as I am not where near as courageous or as knowledgeable you. I give you two thumbs up.

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  • Wild-Bill made the instructable Built-in Kitchen Shelves! 1 year ago
    Built-in Kitchen Shelves!

    That is an incredible way of increasing storage space. Being 3 1/2 inches deep it is nearly perfect. I too have a small kitchen and have found ways to increase storage using things like a ceiling hung pot rack. A friend of mine, who was also a contractor at the time, told be about creating a floor to ceiling cabinet where the shelves were only 4" deep, so nothing would get hidden behind anything else, which is similar to your solution. I turned that idea around and put it onto pull out shelves. My solution is no where as pretty as yours but as functional.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on gunnie24's instructable Modern Console Cabinet1 year ago
    Modern Console Cabinet

    I am a Mid-century modern fan. I like your interpretation. Those doors are perfect. I am sitting on a pile of Teak veneer I picked up for 2 cents on the dollar at an auction. When I get some time, I might give it a try, as my white 1970s Ikea console should be replaced. I don't trust pocket screws structurally and tend to use them sparingly and use more wood joinery and glue, but they sure simplify the process. Thanks.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on LanceMakes's instructable PVC & Duct Tape Kayak1 year ago
    PVC & Duct Tape Kayak

    Your instructable/idea of building a kayak out of pvc is provocative. George Dyson wrote a book called Baidarka where he builds a kayak with a metal tubular frame. It got me thinking that PVC could be used as it is not too hard to bend PVC. Thanks for the instructable.

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  • Treasure Chest From Reclaimed Mystery Wood (Hand Tools Only)

    It is always nice to see that you don't need a bunch of power tools to make something and you have done a lovely job. I am not as masterful but I do understand the pleasure in working with hand tools - Their use being relatively quiet for me is one of the attactions. Thank You

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  • Wild-Bill commented on John deCaux's instructable Fastest Way to Cut a Bell Pepper1 year ago
    Fastest Way to Cut a Bell Pepper

    Or a KiwiNext time I make a Pizza. Nice method, so thanks for the instructable.

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  • Chainsaw Mill Build, Use & Tips N Tricks

    I have seen a lots of ideas about chain saw mills. The idea of using a ladder and cutting down hill are truly innovative. I have a wood lot and the idea of having a chain saw mill holds interest for me but I only have a 20 inch bar on my chainsaw which is good for felling and perfect cutting firewood but a bit small for a chainsaw mill. Your instructable is very informative and extremely well done.

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  • Solar Powered APRS Digipeater for Amateur Radio

    Cool - I feel that the Internet has had its effect on reducing the people who might have become interested in HAM radio. I find your project fascinating and I have just learned some thing new. Years ago I looked at building a repeater based data transfer system for a forest products company (I was the IT weeny). The idea was floated to me by by a HAM who developed a business creating remote security monitoring systems. I encountered him as he was looking into real time open source video compression. Unfortunately my company wasn't willing to consider the proposal. It would have been so simple to pull off using just handhelds. We already had most of the physical locations (for out radio network) and we only really needed one new location to get the data network to work to fully cover o...

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    Cool - I feel that the Internet has had its effect on reducing the people who might have become interested in HAM radio. I find your project fascinating and I have just learned some thing new. Years ago I looked at building a repeater based data transfer system for a forest products company (I was the IT weeny). The idea was floated to me by by a HAM who developed a business creating remote security monitoring systems. I encountered him as he was looking into real time open source video compression. Unfortunately my company wasn't willing to consider the proposal. It would have been so simple to pull off using just handhelds. We already had most of the physical locations (for out radio network) and we only really needed one new location to get the data network to work to fully cover out operating area, thinking of things like remote portable cutblock weather stations. I never thought of using it to monitor the logging trucks. I think, that the potential scope of the project and what it could do for the company, scared them. Looking at the APRS.fi is interesting. Thanks.

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  • The 16 Brick Rocket Stove - Quick (30 Second) Build - Easy DIY - Simple Instructions

    What you linked is a rocket stove mass heater. That too is a rocket stove used to heat ones domicile. The original invention of the rocket stove was for cooking as a distinct improvement over the three stone stove. I view the only real problem with the stove in this instructable is that it is not high enough. The higher the stove gives the bigger the draw, which gives a more complete and cleaner burn, like you would get in the article's rocket stove mass heater.

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  • Poor Man's Google Glass/Aid for Those With Tunnel Vision

    Fantastic Instructable, you have done a great job and what a cool application of the Raspberry Pi Zero. I didn't know there was a Wide-Angle camera out there. For me, that information by itself, makes this Raspberry Pi Instructable #1. I am ordering that camera today. Thank-You.

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  • No Table Saw?  No Problem!  Build a Portable Cutting Table and Use Your Circular Saw

    I like your table. With my daughter I through a table together using those folding legs, for a dinner with family and friends. I now us it as a cutting table. I protect the surface somewhat (yes I have made mistakes) with a sheet of cardboard. I find it easier cutting plywood with a track saw then with a light-weight table saw. The only time I use the light-weight table saw is for ripping lumber.

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  • Developing Black and White Film at Home

    I haven't used a film camera much since 1983 except for a few weddings where I rented equipment. I haven't been in a darkroom since around 1978. I just recently acquired a Leica 3 (pretty ancient) with the idea of getting back into B&W photography. I thought of going large format but the cost seems too extreme, especially as I will not be earning any money with the camera. 35mm film equipment is easy to come by if one is patient. I just snagged 5 filters for my camera, a grain magnified and a film tank at an auction just the other day for $20. I am starting to see more people using film again. I was a bit concerned with you dumping chemicals down the drain back in the 70s we were very cautious about chemical disposing. Have things changed in that regard with different formulations?...

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    I haven't used a film camera much since 1983 except for a few weddings where I rented equipment. I haven't been in a darkroom since around 1978. I just recently acquired a Leica 3 (pretty ancient) with the idea of getting back into B&W photography. I thought of going large format but the cost seems too extreme, especially as I will not be earning any money with the camera. 35mm film equipment is easy to come by if one is patient. I just snagged 5 filters for my camera, a grain magnified and a film tank at an auction just the other day for $20. I am starting to see more people using film again. I was a bit concerned with you dumping chemicals down the drain back in the 70s we were very cautious about chemical disposing. Have things changed in that regard with different formulations? Thanks for the instructable.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Unusual Uses for Duct Tape1 year ago
    Unusual Uses for Duct Tape

    I always have duct tape in my kit when I cycle tour as it can fix anything but then I am Canadian. I have been using Gorilla tape where I need some repairs to last longer. I heard of using duct tape to remove warts. Sorry guys it does not work. It will soften the excess skin making it easy to remove (debraid) the external wart but the wart virus will remain and it will reappear.

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  • Wild-Bill made the instructable Backyard Shou Sugi Ban1 year ago
    Backyard Shou Sugi Ban

    I am finishing the exterior (I am very slow) of my sauna using Shou Sugi Ban but using a very non-traditional Tiger Torch. I don't use a metal brush. I tried a steal brush and a copper brush but I found them to hard. On the other hand, I found that, for me, a nylon brush works best because it doesn't remove any wood just the char. It raises the wood grain giving it a very nice texture. Dust wasn't a problem as I do the whole process very wet. I plan to finish all the cedar in boiled Linseed Oil (Tung Oil is traditionally used but it is very expensive). So far I have only used the Tung Oil on the coat rack in the sauna and the results, I thought, were gorgeous. Shou Sugi Ban is a very cool technique, so thank you for putting together this instructable.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on vspencer's instructable Quick and Easy Shoe Liner Repair1 year ago
    Quick and Easy Shoe Liner Repair

    I want to thank you for your instructable. I have an old pair of cycling shoes I love. Nobody makes a leather shoe like this any more. The insides are badly wore out. I am going to try some of your ideas to repair them, to keep them alive for just a bit longer. GOOP is a really good product for repairing the soles of shoes. It originally came only in Shoe GOOP but comes in a couple of different flavours and there are several copy cats. It will work better than hot glue on the outsides of shoes.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on djpolymath's instructable Hand Plane Restorations1 year ago
    Hand Plane Restorations

    They look too shiny to me (I have grown to like the patina that the metal gets with age) - beautifully restored. I have several very old planes in my work shop that I love to use. My favourite is a small pocket plane. When I picked up that pocket plane, I also got several other planes in very rough shape. I eventually gave them to a fellow who restored planes - I know they had a lot of value by the look on the guys face when I offered them to him for free. If I had seen this Instructable, I might have tried to restore them but I would never have thrown them away as I was aware of their uniqueness.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on TheCuttingBored's instructable How to Make a $20 Router Sled1 year ago
    How to Make a $20 Router Sled

    With a slight modification it would make a great plywood scarfer for edge gluing sheets of plywood but MDF might be too heavy.

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  • Wild-Bill made the instructable 9 Easy Ways to Distress Wood1 year ago
    9 Easy Ways to Distress Wood

    My favourite technique, at the moment, is Shou Sugi Ban or The Japanese burnt cedar technique, but then I am building a sauna and I am using it on the exterior. I like the way it raises the grain. I burn it with a Tiger Torch, put out the fire by soak it down with water, remove the char with a nylon brush and finally wash it off the loose char. I am going to finish it with boiled linseed oil (traditionally it is done with Tung Oil).

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  • Wild-Bill made the instructable Perfect Pizza Dough Recipe1 year ago
    Perfect Pizza Dough Recipe

    This is a master class in pizza making. This does not convey the idea that Pizza is dead easy to make. I do like pizza made with 00 flour as the texture is quit a bit different, then when it is made from bread flour, but it is hard to come by. When I find some in the big city, I will give your recipe/method a try.I am a "thin cruster" myself. For me it is a quick and easy meal. I do it a lot for house guest - I host on Couchsurfing and WarmShowers. I cheat. I use bread flour. I use instant yeast. I use tap hot water. I add garlic powder (well it is not powder as it is kind of courser) to the mix to make the crust tasty. Flour to pizza less that 2 hours. I cook on field tiles (unglazed tile - they are super cheap as opposed to pizza stone and when not in use they don't take ...

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    This is a master class in pizza making. This does not convey the idea that Pizza is dead easy to make. I do like pizza made with 00 flour as the texture is quit a bit different, then when it is made from bread flour, but it is hard to come by. When I find some in the big city, I will give your recipe/method a try.I am a "thin cruster" myself. For me it is a quick and easy meal. I do it a lot for house guest - I host on Couchsurfing and WarmShowers. I cheat. I use bread flour. I use instant yeast. I use tap hot water. I add garlic powder (well it is not powder as it is kind of courser) to the mix to make the crust tasty. Flour to pizza less that 2 hours. I cook on field tiles (unglazed tile - they are super cheap as opposed to pizza stone and when not in use they don't take up any space in your cupboard). My pizza peel is made from a scrape of 1/4" plywood treated with bees wax which I made on a cool and snowy night so I could cook pizzas in my wood heater (it has a small oven on top) and my wooden cutting board (which I had been using as a peel up until then) was too big fit. The recipe that I started came from the Joy of Cooking recipe, but now I accurately measure nothing and do it by feel aiming for a soft dough that is easily shaped by hand.

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  • Green Solar Powered Water Barrel Version 2

    Nice set up. I have seen those totes show up at auctions occasionally and they can be had for $50-$100. A friend picked up one for his son for $62.50 (all taxes and auctioneer fees). I am going to send him a link to this instructable.

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  • Wild-Bill made the instructable Sourdough Starter and Bread Recipe1 year ago
    Sourdough Starter and Bread Recipe

    Warning - it is wild yeast - for some reason I had a reaction to it. It wasn't in eating it but to its increased presents in the air when it was fermenting it. When I finally (it took a while) figured out what was causing my reaction, I though the starter into my compost. I sure loved the bread and I still use the sponge method when I make my bread now.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Best Ginger Beer1 year ago
    Best Ginger Beer

    Cream of Tarter, you say, I must try. I will even try the pepper and chilli. I have a beer making setup with kegs and CO2 and have been making Ginger Beer for quite a few years. Thanks for the tips to improve my recipe.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on Leviathan17's instructable $8.00 LED Shop Light2 years ago
    $8.00 LED Shop Light

    Ya the lights are cheap, I like your kiss approach. I picked up some hardware for doing a kitchen L/E.D.installation and it got me thinking of added more lights in my workshop and replacing some florescence lights.

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  • How Make a Flattening Jig for a Router

    Very nice instructable and easily made jig . Your jig could be used to scarf plywood (to edge gluing plywood to make larger sheets).

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  • Brick and Polished Concrete BBQ Table

    Did a concrete slab using an upside down technique and used silly putty to round over the corners.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on ProjectPayload's instructable Raspberry Pi GPS Tracker2 years ago
    Raspberry Pi GPS Tracker

    Nice Project. You can remove intentional GPS Jitter by referencing to GPS data from a fixed location. It will not help with GPS reflection errors caused by buildings. I ended up looking at your project as I am in the process (V #1 working) of building a car computer using as Pi 3 and Pi touch screen. I thought of adding a USB GPS puck as there are some odd problems using GPS hats with the PI 3. Have fun.

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  • How to Build a Bi-Fuel (LPG & Unleaded) Trip Computer Using Arduino

    I have just started adventuring down this road of building a car computer with version 1 up and running. Your instructable is an inspiration - as I still have a long way to go and a lot to do.

    It is currently a bit Mikey Mouse. I was putting together a HiFi system to play my music from my PC via WIFI & NFS, and a Raspberry Pi 3 with HiFiBerry through my Stereo-Receiver. I thought, hey I could put it in my car less my PC, WiFi & NFS. and HiFiBerry. A two hour hack (I had to fix the lighter plug fuse, get ride of the video off the audio plug, move my music to a thumb drive and a clever use of "ln -s" so to the software the music is in the same place on all three machines (PC, Stereo Pi and the Car Pi)) and it is up and running and I can use rsync and NFS from the car at home to keep the music and play lists current, Well now I have an entertainment system in my car how about GPS and Open Street Maps (Adafruit has something it does yet work this the PI 3 no...

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    It is currently a bit Mikey Mouse. I was putting together a HiFi system to play my music from my PC via WIFI & NFS, and a Raspberry Pi 3 with HiFiBerry through my Stereo-Receiver. I thought, hey I could put it in my car less my PC, WiFi & NFS. and HiFiBerry. A two hour hack (I had to fix the lighter plug fuse, get ride of the video off the audio plug, move my music to a thumb drive and a clever use of "ln -s" so to the software the music is in the same place on all three machines (PC, Stereo Pi and the Car Pi)) and it is up and running and I can use rsync and NFS from the car at home to keep the music and play lists current, Well now I have an entertainment system in my car how about GPS and Open Street Maps (Adafruit has something it does yet work this the PI 3 no problem use my PI 2 B - put on a high gain WiFi antenna cool so I can keep my mail updated on the road) and why not capture, collect, manipulate and display car stats from the OBD. Everything you were doing is not so Mikey Mouse, most of the stuff I am doing is trivial by comparison as it is like plug and play but still a whole lot of fun. So far I haven't had to program anything though I might have to when it comes to the OBD (and I might hack a Python music project as I stumbled across some bugs) - I have been supporting Open Street Maps for years so I feel very confident that I will not have much trouble implementing it. Now, how about 3 Pi 0 W plus IR cameras to record the ride? Oh, a picture of my Pi currently sitting face down in the passenger seat would be a bit boring - I am thinking of a cool off the shelf mount though.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on mteasdale's instructable Bicycle Chain Whip2 years ago
    Bicycle Chain Whip

    Here I was wondering if wood would work. I am a wood worker not a metal worker and I see that plastic may be problematic. I have piles of used long chain and small lengths of new chain as I ride a bent trike. Once I make this mod (a spline retainer with a spring locking ring) to my Rohloff (the coolest internal speed hub ever made) I will never need a chain whip again so it is worth the try. My conversion parts, hopefully, arriving this week, if I succeed I will post it here. I could probably borrow a whip but I am up to the challenge. Thank you for showing the courage to try something different.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on AndrewC24's instructable Montreal Style Whole Wheat Bagels2 years ago
    Montreal Style Whole Wheat Bagels

    It has been years since I have made any bagels - my next batch of bread is going to be bagels. Oh Thank you.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on shapespeare's instructable Metric Bread2 years ago
    Metric Bread

    It would take me longer to defrost it then it would to make it. I take bread flour, instant yeast, garlic powder, salt, olive oil, hot water, mix, knead, rise, form, rest, dress, bake.

    I totally concur on using a digital scale for making bread as it makes everything repeatable. Everything but pizza - I having been making pizza for such a long time and it is such a small amount of dough, I just do it by feel.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on Joerg Engels's instructable Pure Rye Bread2 years ago
    Pure Rye Bread

    I thank you for your introduction to making rye bread. I will have to digest it as you have given a great deal of information. Just the way you talk about it, you sound like an acquaintance of mine who is a German Master Baker.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on Darthorso's instructable Easy Handmade Manitoba Bread2 years ago
    Easy Handmade Manitoba Bread

    The olive oil on the hands - great tip which I plan to use on my next batch. Here in Canada we just call it Bread Flour.. I get mine from a well known mill just down the road from where I live. Thank you for sharing.

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  • Wild-Bill made the instructable Easy No Knead Bread2 years ago
    Easy No Knead Bread

    I stumbled across a very similar recipe in a New York Times and gave it a try a few weeks ago. I used their method on the second rise of putting the dough ball on a non-terry cloth cotton dish towel generously covered with corn meal with ball seam side down. I felt I should have covered the top with a sprinkle of corn meal as well as the plastic wrap got a bit sticky. I think the corn meal ultimately gives it a great top crust. I am really glad you wrote this instructable, for those who fear the knead, congratulations.

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  • 6.3 kiloWatt Ground Mount Home Solar Array

    Great instructable. I dare say many of us DIYers have thought about going Solar. I have always questions whether to go ground or roof mount. Thanks. One thing I would always do is to put in roof mount hot water heat. These systems for direct heating water are very efficient and will work at -20f. I remember reading an article about a house in Germany where this had been done and there biggest problem was that their system made the water too hot.

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  • HOW TO MAKE PERFECT BRIOCHE BREAD

    It is way easier and with more consistent results to use a scale. I picked up a digital cheap ($11) and it does pounds, grams and can measure water volume as well (though I never use it). A good addition to any kitchen. How to measure - you put bowl on scale and zero it out - add flour to the correct weight. Easy. I use to weigh with a triple beam balance scale ($300+) - not so trivial.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on audreyobscura's instructable How to make bread from scratch2 years ago
    How to make bread from scratch

    I do a lot by feel as well. When i knead my dough i know what it should feel like and if I have add more flour or water. No Zen, just confidence, and experience. I wish you the best in your bread making endeavours. And no fear can bring you some very interesting results.

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  • Wild-Bill made the instructable How to Make Bread From Scratch2 years ago
    How to Make Bread From Scratch

    Lovely looking bread. I have been playing around making bread for quite a few years. My last bread I made had pumpkin with some pumpkin pie spices which I named Wild Spiced Pumpkin Bread. I always use a sponge method where I let the 1/2 the flour and all the water and yeast bubble overnight as one would do with a sourdough and my loaves are rustic style. I really enjoy making bread and I love the feel of the dough as I knead. I hope your Instructable gets more people out there making their own. The photo is of my first wild yeast sourdough loaf.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on asergeeva's instructable How to spread kindness2 years ago
    How to spread kindness

    You made my day

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  • Wild-Bill commented on Garden Girl Recipes's instructable Braided Nutella Bread2 years ago
    Braided Nutella Bread

    It is a very pretty looking loaf and I love that you used Himalayan salt. Nutella may taste good but you really need to read the ingredients list. I am going to try your technique as It gives me an idea for a cinnamon-walnut-raisoin loaf.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on AvjonesV's instructable Greek Style Cheese Pies2 years ago
    Greek Style Cheese Pies

    Looks delicious. I use to make Spanakopita, spinach pie, folding it the same way as well as casserole style. I am going to have to get some filo and try your recipe. I haven't used filo in years.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on fixthisbuildthat's instructable DIY Concrete Top Coffee Table2 years ago
    DIY Concrete Top Coffee Table

    Ya, concrete is fun to play with. Nice job. It makes great garden furniture, as no one is going to run off with it. Except that it is a lot of work, colouring the concrete and adding some contrasting aggregate and then polishing it to a gloss with diamond pads with a variable speed grinder can make your project look super cool. My only real complaint about working with concrete is that it is so heavy even when only working with a cubic foot at a time.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on mucek4's instructable Finnish sauna2 years ago
    Finnish sauna

    I can see some knots in your pictures, you have to be careful of those knots as they can burn you. I don't know anything about linden wood, the Finns I believe use pine and I have heard that Redwood and Basswood are acceptable to use in saunas as well. Here in British Columbia Canada due to the availability, I have been using Western Red cedar and only the clear cedar where needed as it is nearly twice as expensive as the tight knot. I am still in the process of building my sauna and I am very impressed by how little it cost you, mine is a bit more of a money pit. I thought of building an electric sauna in my house, but for me, a wood fired sauna has always struck me so being the ultimate way to go.

    It is interesting that Linden and Basswood are related, we do not have either tree growing here, to my knowledge. I came across someone in the USA who was selling Basswood Sauna kits. Yes, wood heaters are expensive and it is expensive to ship them, especially across Canada. I like this one because it has a water heater and can be feed it from the change room. I will have to mention you to my neighbour, who came from Slovenian. If I knew how to work competently with metal and I had the tools, then I would have contemplated building my own stove probably out of a propane bottle.. Now I just need to get the doors built and installed, and I can start using the sauna. I have a Finnish friend who claims it is an excellent way to detoxify ones body, but me I just like taking saunas - the la...

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    It is interesting that Linden and Basswood are related, we do not have either tree growing here, to my knowledge. I came across someone in the USA who was selling Basswood Sauna kits. Yes, wood heaters are expensive and it is expensive to ship them, especially across Canada. I like this one because it has a water heater and can be feed it from the change room. I will have to mention you to my neighbour, who came from Slovenian. If I knew how to work competently with metal and I had the tools, then I would have contemplated building my own stove probably out of a propane bottle.. Now I just need to get the doors built and installed, and I can start using the sauna. I have a Finnish friend who claims it is an excellent way to detoxify ones body, but me I just like taking saunas - the last time I had one I was cycling through Europe. Cheers

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  • Wild-Bill commented on MichaelM2015's instructable Pumpkin Pie from Scratch2 years ago
    Pumpkin Pie from Scratch

    Yummy. Maybe it is time to make another pumpkin pie. I have a pumpkin on my doorstep and several containers of cooked pumpkin in the freezer. I have never grown sugar pumpkins but orange and white ones. My recipe uses any type of pumpkin or even Hubbard squash (my mother thought Hubbard squash made better pumpkin pies than pumpkin). 2lb of pumpkin makes about 2 cups of cooked pumpkin which is enough for a pie. I just cook mine in a pot on the stove with a little water skin side down. When processing a large pumpkin I freeze the cooked pumpkin in 2 cup units. I don't know pumpkin spice(?) but use grated nutmeg, ginger powder, ground cinnamon in equal quantities (1/2 tsp) plus a few cloves and a couple of cardamon pods (all ground up with a mortar and pestle). I use canned evaporated mi...

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    Yummy. Maybe it is time to make another pumpkin pie. I have a pumpkin on my doorstep and several containers of cooked pumpkin in the freezer. I have never grown sugar pumpkins but orange and white ones. My recipe uses any type of pumpkin or even Hubbard squash (my mother thought Hubbard squash made better pumpkin pies than pumpkin). 2lb of pumpkin makes about 2 cups of cooked pumpkin which is enough for a pie. I just cook mine in a pot on the stove with a little water skin side down. When processing a large pumpkin I freeze the cooked pumpkin in 2 cup units. I don't know pumpkin spice(?) but use grated nutmeg, ginger powder, ground cinnamon in equal quantities (1/2 tsp) plus a few cloves and a couple of cardamon pods (all ground up with a mortar and pestle). I use canned evaporated milk, 1/2 cup brown sugar and 2 eggs. I make pumpkin soup and bread. I save a few seeds for next year and, salt and roast the rest. I love pumpkin pie and pumpkin are very easy to grow.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on Josehf Murchison's instructable Cream of Giant Puffball Soup2 years ago
    Cream of Giant Puffball Soup

    I have two giant puff ball sitting on my kitchen counter. I just finished frying some of it up. What can I do with the rest of it. Soup? Thanks for the recipe. I am not good at following other peoples recipe but your recipe gives me a good place to start. Thank you for posting it. Oh ya, it is on the stove.

    I skipped the Crème Fraîche (might try serving it with a dollop of a local 6% fat yogurt), used double the (veggie) stock, used oregano as I am out of thyme, no flour but about 1/4 cup of butter, doubled the onion and added 1/2 a bubble of garlic. It is gorgeous. When it cools down I will throw a fair bit of it into the freezer.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on innerbubba's instructable 60-minute bookcase2 years ago
    60-minute bookcase

    A visually striking design. Too many exposed edges for me to use plywood but regular 3/4 wood combined to desired width and it all biscuit joined, I could see myself doing that. Your piece is inspiring.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on woodumakeit's instructable Cedar Glider2 years ago
    Cedar Glider

    It is a beautiful glider but you do not need a bunch of fancy power equipment to build one. The one he built here is gorgeous, if you put your mind to it you would be surprised what you can build with a minimal tool set. The biggest thing you need is space.

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  • Convert a chest freezer to kegerator or fermenter for $20

    I did mine many years ago during my Lagering phase. The freezer eventually failed. since then I have been using an all fridge where no electronics are needed. Oh, I keep my hops in an actual freezer. I never leave my kegs attached to the C02, as I find it totally unnecessary as I never put more that 16 litres into a 19 litre keg (I do 30+l batches). I really enjoyed your instructable. Prost, skál, sláinte, lloniannau, cheers

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  • Amazing Homemade Pizza Dough

    For you my sun-dried tomato walnut pesto pizza sauce recipe: Put 12-6 sun dried tomatoes in a bowl and cover with boiling hot water and then turn them over once in a while for about an hour or so. Separate and peel the cloves of a 1/2-1 bulb of garlic. Put sun dried tomatoes (& soaking water), garlic, a grasping handful of walnut halves (warning chopped walnuts tend to be rancid), a small can of Italian tomato paste, 1/2 - 1 tsp of pureed Chipotle pepper (I puree a can of Chipotle peppers and then measure and freeze them in an ice cube tray) and a twist of a salt grinder into a small food processor. Run and add olive oil until it is spreadable. Taste and adjust. Freeze what is not used in a glass jar with olive oil on top.

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  • Real Cherry Popsicle With Added Trace Minerals

    Oh I know that tastes good because I pit and freeze my cherries (Lamberts) and eat them over the next few months. The next best thing to a fresh cherry is a frozen cherry. The only thing I need is a bigger freezer.

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