author
1Instructables7,069Views12CommentsJoined June 22nd, 2015

Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile

Achievements

    • Photoresist Dry Film - a New Method of Applying It to Copper Clad
      1,965 views
      25 favorites
      18 comments
  • Photoresist Dry Film - a New Method of Applying It to Copper Clad

    From my histopathology days xylene, toluene and many other benzene derivatives are toxic and carcinogenic. That is why, if you intend to try these as an alternative to water, that you wear latex gloves and carry out the technique under a fume extraction system of some sort

    Also don't bother with gasoline that contains added ethanol

    Alcohol certainly gets rid of muck from your fingers and improves the ability of the film to adhere to the copper as a result. But it doesn't get rid of fibres and dust particles, in fact you will add more fibres to the copper from the cloth you rub it with. I would suggest rub the copper down with alcohol or what ever to remove grease etc and then apply the film under water as well as that.

    Press'n'Peel is worse than bloody UV film if used as instructed. I tried it and the amount of touching up I had to then do was just impractical.So I also applied the second lot of press'n'peel via water. The stiffer plastics meant that it started lifting off the surface of the copper around the edges before it was 100% dry. So I broke out the iron regardless. And it actually worked very well despite the fact it was still damp. The amount of touching up I had to do on this second attempt was actually manageable.Press'n'Peel seems to have a particular problem with the copper not being mirror smooth, i.e. the weave of the fibreglass cloth is embossed in the copper layer.

    View Instructable »
  • Photoresist Dry Film - a New Method of Applying It to Copper Clad

    Xylene is sold as 'paint thinners' at Bunnings in Australia and what ever hardware chains are in your own country.

    Are you or were you involved with histopathology also?

    Further areas of experimentation would be to try different fluids, preferably one with a lower boiling point to speed up the drying process. I tried metho/ethanol (boiling point around 60 degrees Celsius) but sadly it dissolves the photoresist polymer.Xylene might be worth a try but you would have to be careful about that because (from my days in the Department of Anatomical Pathology at the Austin Hospital) it does carry some risk of being toxic and carcinogenic - it is a benzene derivative after all. So if you try this latex gloves and a chemical fume extractor system is recommended if you intend to prepare a lot of boards.Mineral turpentine might also be worth a try - that would be cheaper than xylene. Not sure about it biological toxicity though. Latex gloves would be minimum protec...

    see more »

    Further areas of experimentation would be to try different fluids, preferably one with a lower boiling point to speed up the drying process. I tried metho/ethanol (boiling point around 60 degrees Celsius) but sadly it dissolves the photoresist polymer.Xylene might be worth a try but you would have to be careful about that because (from my days in the Department of Anatomical Pathology at the Austin Hospital) it does carry some risk of being toxic and carcinogenic - it is a benzene derivative after all. So if you try this latex gloves and a chemical fume extractor system is recommended if you intend to prepare a lot of boards.Mineral turpentine might also be worth a try - that would be cheaper than xylene. Not sure about it biological toxicity though. Latex gloves would be minimum protection.Acetone is out because, if ethanol dissolves the UV polymer, acetone definitely will.

    View Instructable »