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6Instructables2,873Views396CommentsWilmington, WAJoined January 7th, 2008
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  • charlessenf-gm commented on SparkyGiraffe's instructable Crochet Llama Hat!9 days ago
    Crochet Llama Hat!

    Great work - but where's the music? ;)Alamahat alamahat alamahat alamahat In the village, the peaceful village the lion sleeps tonight . . .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQlByoPdG6c

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  • Table That Can Be Turned Into a Chair and a Storage Unit

    Elegant! Patent before IKEA sees it!

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  • Router Rails - Smooth ANY Surface Completely Flat!

    "Not Ouchy Proof"There are lots of warnings. However, you cannot fix stupid so the best way is to let stupid people hurt themselves because that works so much better than printed warnings. Ask stumpy!

    I like your design and agree it is an improvement over those that restrict the movement of the router when it comes to the Boarddum Factor. Also appreciated the SPLINES and your Splines Jig. Not sure about the plexiglas base - does it FLEX under pressure? I would think rigidity is as important (or more) than bit watch. I recently returned a plexiglas trim router base because - using it as intended, the router bit would 'come out of square' and 'trim' the pattern off the laminate edge! In this case, the height of the bit above the work is crucial and the weight of the router and the downward pressure applied by the user (attempting to maintain contact) effectively works to change the height above the work.As the width of the rails (wider the work) increases the rigidity of the metal ra...

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    I like your design and agree it is an improvement over those that restrict the movement of the router when it comes to the Boarddum Factor. Also appreciated the SPLINES and your Splines Jig. Not sure about the plexiglas base - does it FLEX under pressure? I would think rigidity is as important (or more) than bit watch. I recently returned a plexiglas trim router base because - using it as intended, the router bit would 'come out of square' and 'trim' the pattern off the laminate edge! In this case, the height of the bit above the work is crucial and the weight of the router and the downward pressure applied by the user (attempting to maintain contact) effectively works to change the height above the work.As the width of the rails (wider the work) increases the rigidity of the metal rails decreases and 'flexing' becomes more of an issue. If the handles are outboard of the support rails, this would reduce the impact of the users efforts to hold the router 'to the work.'The use of 'off the shelf' shelving supports - excellent! BTW, since the 'inside' of the U-shape is 'rounded,' you should get a snug(er) fit by taking a round-over bit to edges of the frame holding the router that fit inside the 'rails.'Thank you for sharing!

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  • charlessenf-gm's instructable Dog Food Bag Insulation Protector +Plus's weekly stats: 16 days ago
    • Dog Food Bag Insulation Protector +Plus
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  • How to Make a Powerful Hydraulic Press

    Have you tried hydraulic oil?

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  • charlessenf-gm's instructable One Quart Creamer Pitcher's weekly stats: 23 days ago
    • One Quart Creamer Pitcher
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  • charlessenf-gm commented on bulletgirl's instructable Easy Step Stool24 days ago
    Easy Step Stool

    Tried the fownload and . . .<Error><Code>NoSuchKey</Code><Message>The specified key does not exist.</Message><Key>FIM/7QX0/JS5CEUT3/FIM7QX0JS5CEUT3.mp4</Key><RequestId>0F5F4336370C4E56</RequestId>"); vertical-align: bottom; height: 10px;"><HostId>dqvKBhTy4EHkSAnbxYRcz1/lCQEasp3dRcoqyb1/9Xt3ngvkrviKcQ8MuCU4xKG6inF2rDhE/xc=</HostId></Error>

    Elegant. Well executed. Find a router to cut dado an rabbets to capture the steps eliminating the supporting pieces - they make bits designed to cut standard plywood thicknesses in a single pass.I'm putting it on my bucket list Thanks for the inspiration!.

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  • How NOT to Make a River Table (For Your Chair!)

    That is pretty and functional as well. I wonder how stable? I was thinking that the inside leg, were it to fit between the arm and the cushion would add to the stability - another six inches on one leg.

    "...making way too much because math is hard..."If you find yourself telling yourself such things at "Math is hard,' or 'I don't do/like Math," best to stop ASAP. Especially if you have a child. These are examples if self-fulfilling prophecies that act to give yourself permission to fail. If you've 27" inches of 1/2" thick board and the average width* if the void to be filled is 1.5" then you've got 27*1.5*.5 = 20.25 cu in to fill. Since a Cubic Inch is equal to .55 Ounces** (0.554113) about 12 ounces of solution should do - but add 10% just in case or about 13 ounces. So, 27*1.5*.5 * 0.554113 = 11.22078825 Ounces and and one or two for good measure!Simple, not 'hard.' * Measure the distance of the gap every inch along the board and add the 28 measur...

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    "...making way too much because math is hard..."If you find yourself telling yourself such things at "Math is hard,' or 'I don't do/like Math," best to stop ASAP. Especially if you have a child. These are examples if self-fulfilling prophecies that act to give yourself permission to fail. If you've 27" inches of 1/2" thick board and the average width* if the void to be filled is 1.5" then you've got 27*1.5*.5 = 20.25 cu in to fill. Since a Cubic Inch is equal to .55 Ounces** (0.554113) about 12 ounces of solution should do - but add 10% just in case or about 13 ounces. So, 27*1.5*.5 * 0.554113 = 11.22078825 Ounces and and one or two for good measure!Simple, not 'hard.' * Measure the distance of the gap every inch along the board and add the 28 measurements and divide the total by twenty eight to get an average:(m1+m2+m3+m4+m5+m6+m7+m8+m9+m10+m11+m12+m13+m14+m15+m16+m17+m18+m19+m20+m21+m22+m23+m24+m25+m26+m27+m28)/28** Didn't know that off hand? Simply as Google "How many ounces in a cubic inch?" and see what you get.

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  • Insulating a Floor Underneath the Crawlspace

    Simpson Strong-Tie; 16 in. Insulation Support (100-Qty);Flexible yet strong with carbon steel, spring wire construction. Mitered tips penetrate wood to keep insulation sheet in place. Easy to use for DIYers of any skill level; $14.31/case https://www.homedepot.com/p/Simpson-Strong-Tie-16-...By the way, reading all the advice offered here I thought to advise anyone embarking on such a project to get a few grains of salt or, better yet, speak, NO! - better yet ask and LISTEN to professionals and take the time to research a project before you begin!If she had jacked the shed up higher on the one end another eight inches (1 block) before leveling it, the insulation task would have been simpler. I suspect that, had she asked a few folks at the professionals desk she might have heard about ...

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    Simpson Strong-Tie; 16 in. Insulation Support (100-Qty);Flexible yet strong with carbon steel, spring wire construction. Mitered tips penetrate wood to keep insulation sheet in place. Easy to use for DIYers of any skill level; $14.31/case https://www.homedepot.com/p/Simpson-Strong-Tie-16-...By the way, reading all the advice offered here I thought to advise anyone embarking on such a project to get a few grains of salt or, better yet, speak, NO! - better yet ask and LISTEN to professionals and take the time to research a project before you begin!If she had jacked the shed up higher on the one end another eight inches (1 block) before leveling it, the insulation task would have been simpler. I suspect that, had she asked a few folks at the professionals desk she might have heard about the insulation supports and a variety of insulating alternatives (they re-insulate mobile homes in a similar fashion everyday).Even a simple SHED is designed. The flooring leaves the bottom plate exposed, for instance, so there s a surface to nail the interior wall boards to along the floor and, if youse, the baseboard molding as well. There is a reason for the way the shed was designed - best not to fight 'the program.' Even better to learn it.

    A layer of relatively heavy weight plastic under the structure is always a good idea. Also, the area needs ventilation and somesore of screening to exclude rodents and such for taking up residence therein. You might look to using insulation wire to hold the insulation in place and then add the spray foam to seal them in place as the idea is to capture and hold 'dead air' that is itself an insulator.If the building is up on blocks (as was the case here) raising it up a block and a half first, then lowering and leveling it might be the best approach. And, if you can staple another sheet of plastic to the bottom of the floor joists - it might add to the insulation..

    "Put The Insulation On Top Of The Floor"Well, best to put the insulation outside the package. Adding two inches to the flooring impacts the entry way* and 'hides' the plate one would fasten the bottom edge of the paneling to. Frankly, I think she would have been well advised to leave space between her insulation boards and the underside of the flooring and used wires to hold the sheets in place until she was able to seal the edges with the spray foam and then cover the entire thing with 8-10 mil plastic sheeting stapled to the underside of the floor joists - as in insulating mobile homes.* Trip hazard

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  • AtticTemp - Temperature / Climate Logger

    "Why have a screen on the device when it is in the attic?"I have to ask this as well.Why have anything in the hot cold dusty dirty difficult to access attic save the sensor and the circuitry requisite to transmitting the data down into some 'conditioned' space. Perhaps to a home office computer or to the home wifi and onto the Internet?

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  • Wood Lathe Duplicator With Angle Grinder

    Your comment/tip(s) are intriguing. I can't think of anything (along the same lines) better. Unless, of course,it had included links to the topics/software mentioned!

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on Patsakorn's instructable Shelves Made of Old Drawers4 weeks ago
    Shelves Made of Old Drawers

    Great idea! Good execution. Where the drawer bottom is recessed relative to the drawer front and sides,look to the idea of a French Cleat to hang the drawer.Where the items to be stored therein (as with Spice jars,for instance) are likely to be taken out and replaced on something less than an annual schedule - consider leaving ufficient space for gripping fingers to grab the item(s).

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  • French Apple Pie - Crumbly Crunchy Delicious!

    The conversions are listed parenthetically at the end of each line (were applicable).e.g."100g marzipan (3,5 oz)" Many chefs are of the opinion that weight is the most reliable way to indicate the amount of an ingredient - ounces of Flour, for instance. If you sift your flour, for instance, it is likely the volume would increase. You could, of course, pack it into a measuring cup. That would decrease the volume, of course. However, that would likely increase the weight of the flour added.Worth the investment in a small digital scale.

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  • The Awesomest Jelly Bean Dispenser Ever 2019!

    If you have the right size bit, hide the threaded metal ring below the surface of the top board. Of course, actually threading the top board would be the most elegant approach to this design modification. See, also, the suggestion relating to 'catching' the beans dispensed. Re: that idea, I thought the bottom board might be extended such that a concave 'bowl' in the center would line up with the opening in the bean dispenser when it was opened.

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  • Making a Whale Toothpick Holder

    " The 3mm one on the top allows just a single tooth pick go through."

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  • Making a Whale Toothpick Holder

    Well, "pretty small" is relative, no?

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  • Making a Whale Toothpick Holder

    "pretty sure u take the top off because is a holder not a dispencer (sic)"Actually, he drilled a (blow) hole in the top of the whale's head early on in the video. I suspect the idea is that the end user lifts the whale, turns it upside down and a pick falls through the hole. And, thus, it is a pretty little dispenser!

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on WesH31's instructable Quinzhee7 weeks ago
    Quinzhee

    "... It could be - 25 outside the quinzhee but it will be close to freezing..."Ah, not that is a comfort! ;)

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on WesH31's instructable Outdoor Rustic Stairs7 weeks ago
    Outdoor Rustic Stairs

    "Hammer a 10 inch spike through the stems of the top U into the bottom one"I do believe one would do well to employ a longer spike drilling a hole in the first all but equal to the diameter of the spike so that four inches of spike are driven into the lower section of 8 x 8" post material.The concerns expressed elsewhere relative to the ratio as between Rise and Run are significant. If you first determine the position of the top of the first step and that of the surface of the ground immediately after the bottom step, you can determine the total Rise. Then, the distance between the edge of the first step and that of the last gives the total Run.If you search for 'Building a staircase" you will likely find detailed instructions and calculations for building one 'in s...

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    "Hammer a 10 inch spike through the stems of the top U into the bottom one"I do believe one would do well to employ a longer spike drilling a hole in the first all but equal to the diameter of the spike so that four inches of spike are driven into the lower section of 8 x 8" post material.The concerns expressed elsewhere relative to the ratio as between Rise and Run are significant. If you first determine the position of the top of the first step and that of the surface of the ground immediately after the bottom step, you can determine the total Rise. Then, the distance between the edge of the first step and that of the last gives the total Run.If you search for 'Building a staircase" you will likely find detailed instructions and calculations for building one 'in space' as when constructing one designed to carry folks from one level to the next in a house, etc. While calculating the Rise and Run are done differently, the calculations offer the same results. When there is No Handrail to support one, errors in calculating the ratio is of greater significance and increases (as does the hazard) with steeper terrain.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on Kink Jarfold's instructable KITCHEN CORNER HUTCH7 weeks ago
    KITCHEN CORNER HUTCH

    Thank you for that cardboard template idea!I have a use for something like that.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on WesH31's instructable Building an Outhouse7 weeks ago
    Building an Outhouse

    A great idea. Never knew so many folks were building these. One thought I had related to disposing of the waste as we do with our kitchen scraps. I searched for Composting Toilets and there are lots of ideas 'out there' on building and managing such things. It would seem that would be a commendable objective given the effort requisite to building a structure that would serve either end.I found Rid-X offered as a way to hasten the decomposition process. It would seem such an additive (along with the sawdust) couldn't, as they say, hurt.I also had a thought as to the seat of the throne itself. On most commercially available toilet seats, there are pads on the bottom that elevate it above the ceramic bowl rim. Since, once flushed the bowl is not a source of odor, this 'gap' is inconsequent...

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    A great idea. Never knew so many folks were building these. One thought I had related to disposing of the waste as we do with our kitchen scraps. I searched for Composting Toilets and there are lots of ideas 'out there' on building and managing such things. It would seem that would be a commendable objective given the effort requisite to building a structure that would serve either end.I found Rid-X offered as a way to hasten the decomposition process. It would seem such an additive (along with the sawdust) couldn't, as they say, hurt.I also had a thought as to the seat of the throne itself. On most commercially available toilet seats, there are pads on the bottom that elevate it above the ceramic bowl rim. Since, once flushed the bowl is not a source of odor, this 'gap' is inconsequential.In the instant case, however, a seat that somehow sealed the opening when shut, would leave only the vent pipe for the odors to escape - and that up and outside the convenience. Thee is round plastic foam insulation available at Lowes/Home Depot, etc. Just a thought.For my part, I scored a combination commode and sink from the Boone, NC jailhouse via an auction and have been toying with the idea of building an 'outhouse' to house it. It relies upon a water flush - so the plumbing will prove more complex.Watch for it!

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on helijoc's instructable HVAC Return Air Filter Box8 weeks ago
    HVAC Return Air Filter Box

    Excellent work! Some in 'the industry' might come up with the 'over done' remarks, but if a job is worth doing, it is worth doing the right way the first time. In my opinion, folks in 'the industry' are far more likely to cut corners than shoot for perfection.Yours is a perfect seamless construction as opposed to a box made of several sections with all manner of seams 'taped shut' and a 'mess' upon close inspection.I agree that additional detail on your fiberglassing and insulating materials would be appreciated - maybe you could add a bit. For instance - Six layers of 25# fiberglas cloth or 25 pounds of fiberglas cloth that weighed twenty-five pounds?What did the final piece weigh - or do you know? It looks rather thin in the pics, but six layers - how thick were the walls?One assum...

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    Excellent work! Some in 'the industry' might come up with the 'over done' remarks, but if a job is worth doing, it is worth doing the right way the first time. In my opinion, folks in 'the industry' are far more likely to cut corners than shoot for perfection.Yours is a perfect seamless construction as opposed to a box made of several sections with all manner of seams 'taped shut' and a 'mess' upon close inspection.I agree that additional detail on your fiberglassing and insulating materials would be appreciated - maybe you could add a bit. For instance - Six layers of 25# fiberglas cloth or 25 pounds of fiberglas cloth that weighed twenty-five pounds?What did the final piece weigh - or do you know? It looks rather thin in the pics, but six layers - how thick were the walls?One assumes you put your Air Handler in the Attic as opposed to mounting it in a 'closet' on the ground/main floor because there was no room for a 'closet' for the air handler.Did you ever consider designing a duct take off box for the other end of the equation?One question, if the area of the filter is 800 sq inches and the diameter of the exit is 18" or 254 SQ IN, does that 'choke point' negate the effort?

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  • Easily Soundproof a Stainless Steel Sink

    I did not intend to disparage your completed effort at all. My apologies if I came off as depreciating your successful effort.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on DonS89's instructable Making a Keep-Warm Box8 weeks ago
    Making a Keep-Warm Box

    "...the panels you creatively acquired..."Gee, don't they have Elections where you are?? ;)What a great use for old Trump Signs - creating and maintaining hot air!

    "...Here in North Carolina the winters are pretty mild..."Well, that depends a bit as NC runs from thousands of feet up in them thar hills in Western NC to them grass flats and dunes at sea level on the Atlantic (East) Coast. We've had several weeks of overnight temps well below freezing.

    Every BLACK FRIDAY Walmart and similar vendors offer an electric griddle for ten dollars (US) or so and we buy a couple because the "Non Stick" stuff does not stick to the aluminum griddle itself (where does it go!?).Thus, the old ones are available for tinkering and repurposing and, in this case, of a great shape and size for a cabinet heater. With a little effort, the Heat Control the comes with the griddle can be located outside the cabinet and the thermostat/controller within the cabinet. Then, the griddle would be powered or not according to the interior temperature and the temperature of the griddle governed by its factory controller - this the 'recovery time' could be adjusted accordingly. Though NEVER above the FLASH POINT of the chemicals stored within.

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  • Easily Soundproof a Stainless Steel Sink

    ",,,noise and quick loss of temperature..."I must have known your dad as, in 1996 I rebuilt a bathroom and found the steel tub much much much cheaper than the Cast Iron alternatives. Before installing, I filled the void between the front and one tub wall with (Window & Door) expandable foam and ran rows of the foam along the underside of the remaining tubs walls (and bottom) so as to effectively 'coat' the tub's inside with insulating foam. The job was a bit messy, but the result was a tub that 'sounded' as sturdy as a cast iron version and held the heat better than either. Once the foam stuff sets up, you can trim it with a bread knife (or similar). With a Kitchen sink, however, you really can't use too thick a 'solution (save between the bowls of a double-bow sink) gi...

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    ",,,noise and quick loss of temperature..."I must have known your dad as, in 1996 I rebuilt a bathroom and found the steel tub much much much cheaper than the Cast Iron alternatives. Before installing, I filled the void between the front and one tub wall with (Window & Door) expandable foam and ran rows of the foam along the underside of the remaining tubs walls (and bottom) so as to effectively 'coat' the tub's inside with insulating foam. The job was a bit messy, but the result was a tub that 'sounded' as sturdy as a cast iron version and held the heat better than either. Once the foam stuff sets up, you can trim it with a bread knife (or similar). With a Kitchen sink, however, you really can't use too thick a 'solution (save between the bowls of a double-bow sink) given the necessity of accessing the fasteners that secure it to the counter.Maybe some SPRAY-ON solutions?Design Engineering 050220 Boom Mat Spray-on Sound Deadeninghttps://www.amazon.com/Design-Engineering-050220-Deadening.../B001URKV0G Rating: 4 - ‎182 reviewsReduce unwanted road noise and vibration, even in hard-to-reach places. ... Kilmat 80 mil 36 sqft Car Sound Deadening Mat, Butyl Automotive Sound Deadener, AudioNoise…. ... Design Engineering 050110 Under Carpet Lite Sound Absorption andInsulation, 24" x 70"….

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on AdventuresInJunkLand's instructable Fix Up an Old Laptop!2 months ago
    Fix Up an Old Laptop!

    Well, Thank you very much. It appeared that you selected a region on China - or my Geography teachers failed me. I appreciate the link and may indeed attempt to create such a tool.. If you combine the approach with Google or another Cloud . . . well, independence at last, great God almighty, independence at last! Attempt at humor

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on AdventuresInJunkLand's instructable Fix Up an Old Laptop!2 months ago
    Fix Up an Old Laptop!

    Thank you, I found the Thermaltake ST0005U-C on Amazon; as well as several others similar to Monllack USB 3.0 to IDE & SATA Converter External Hard Drive Adapter Kit 2.5"/3.5" Cable Multifunctional Hard Disk Adapter US Plug. May I safely assume that my laptops contain either 2.5" or 3.5" SATA Format HD? Or must I assume it could be, or could be an IDE or something else? I've four (or maybe five) laptops whose drives I would like to open to extract/copy/move the data off.I was hoping to purchase One Thing a ma jig that would handle whatever HDs I found in my laptops.Thank you again.

    Wouid you please share details about, ins to such adapters? I think I need a set!

    Got it USB 3.0 - Curious, if my 'puter only has USB 2.0 wi it make any difference having teh 3.0 rated transfer device?I noted 'we' have turned this Instructable into a bit of a special interest group / discussion group. I wonder if there is a "Computers 101" group already 'out there?'

    "I assume the sata connector to the HDD end is standard" Makes sense, but what about power? "proprietary for every laptop model" Suspect it is for some - Always hesitate to say "all." . But the five or so laptops I have hanging about waiting to try accessing the HDDs to pull my data and wipe will remain until I can find a UNIVERSAL connection thing that will allow me to connect any (and all) of these drives to a USB port so I can copy off the old data.If you find one, lemme know!

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on AdventuresInJunkLand's instructable Fix Up an Old Laptop!2 months ago
    Fix Up an Old Laptop!

    "We're sorry, but your call did not go through" Tried to call. BTW I cannot 'do text.' VLT* Here )*Very Low Tech"

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on AdventuresInJunkLand's instructable Fix Up an Old Laptop!2 months ago
    Fix Up an Old Laptop!

    I've several old laptops that have bitten too much dust. Each has a hard drive that MAY contain data I would like to have access to. I know that there are adapters to turn small format Hard Drives into USB Powered external Hard Drives and thought that would be a good way to test the Hard Drives from these old laptops to see if I could recover any data from them - then destroy them.It seems, however, that there are more than one type of drive in these laptops so there isn't a single adapter that will work with any/all small hard drives. Is there some sort of cable or device that is designed to connect (but not necessarily encase) different sized drives so they might be read and copied onto other drives or media?

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on JON-A-TRON's instructable Flip-Top CNC Table2 months ago
    Flip-Top CNC Table

    All these Machine Made Projects are impressive. However, the design and execution left one significant feature half done. The work Height for the CNC orientation drops a foot or so relative to the work surface/table position.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on tomatoskins's instructable Simple Belt Sander Blocks4 months ago
    Simple Belt Sander Blocks

    Ah! an 'app.' I was thinking of doing the same thing 'manually' with a ruler! Never thought of using an 'app' but that's the way to go if you've got such a thing!.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on tomatoskins's instructable Simple Belt Sander Blocks4 months ago
    Simple Belt Sander Blocks

    Thank you for this. And the plan! Question: how did you determine the size(s) of the blocks? I have my idea, curious to learn if you used a similar approach.BTW, with Charismas down the road, these make very interesting gifts for the family wood worker - give her/him an EyeObie Belt Sander!

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  • charlessenf-gm's instructable Hollow Core Door Robe Hook Support's weekly stats: 4 months ago
    • Hollow Core Door Robe Hook Support
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  • charlessenf-gm commented on Captain Charlotte's instructable Easy Twisted Potatoes4 months ago
    Easy Twisted Potatoes

    Unique, creative and well done (the taters and the instructable)!

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  • Making Half Blind Dovetail Drawers for a Walnut Desk

    Why did you not use a single board for teh drawer fronts?

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on Grunambulax's instructable Antique Post Office Box Door Bank5 months ago
    Antique Post Office Box Door Bank

    Thanks for the determining the combination steps!Nice work.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on diycreators's instructable Wall Mounted Dream Desk5 months ago
    Wall Mounted Dream Desk

    Wow, Peel and Stick contact paper! You did an excellent job with it! You have a future in furniture design!If you look at where you added the French Cleat to the (whatever do you call the black portion?) you might consider incorporating the cleat into the frame of that 'black portion.' By raising the position of that part of the cleat, you would raise the hanging point a couple of inches.

    If you do decide to build a similar hanging desk, lighten the load! The desk is basically a Torsion Box and, as such, doesn't need all that 3/4" material. If you go down to the home store and look at (lift up, etc.) a hollow core door slab you will find it extremely sturdy because the 'skins' are supported by a lattice work inside. Sometimes this lattice is made of cardboard! If you look up Torsion Box Construction and adapt the principles therein to this project, you will have a sturdy desk that weighs a fraction of something built out of heavy plywood or MDF.As the desk itself is lighter, the desk then becomes capable of carrying that much greater load - if you make it twenty pounds lighter, you can use it for a desktop computer and still put less strain on the French Cleat.By t...

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    If you do decide to build a similar hanging desk, lighten the load! The desk is basically a Torsion Box and, as such, doesn't need all that 3/4" material. If you go down to the home store and look at (lift up, etc.) a hollow core door slab you will find it extremely sturdy because the 'skins' are supported by a lattice work inside. Sometimes this lattice is made of cardboard! If you look up Torsion Box Construction and adapt the principles therein to this project, you will have a sturdy desk that weighs a fraction of something built out of heavy plywood or MDF.As the desk itself is lighter, the desk then becomes capable of carrying that much greater load - if you make it twenty pounds lighter, you can use it for a desktop computer and still put less strain on the French Cleat.By the way, the French Cleat need not be a single continuous strip. One could create the same holding power/strength if a four foot long Cleat were divided into two or three sections - which might better accommodate the wiring.Of course, it is easier to route the wiring to an exit point away from (and below) the cleat in the first place.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on Phil B's instructable Low Tech Inclinometer 5 months ago
    Low Tech Inclinometer

    Good points. I know I 'feel' the tilt and immediately back off without knowing at what point (degrees) I feel the tilt.' So an inclinometer might be something I could use to see if I've been 'over reacting' all these years! I wonder of you used a hard plastic tube (filled with sand to do the bend) . . . or knew a glass blower . . . Ignore the musings. It appears that the mower is equipped with Rollover Protection bars - as is my Kubota. The problem I worry about is it simply tipping over and catching me between the side and the cold hard ground. Regardless such musings good work on all counts, your friend has a friend indeed.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on Phil B's instructable Low Tech Inclinometer 5 months ago
    Low Tech Inclinometer

    Looking at the tool you made to Calibrate the device, I wondered if that would suffice in and of itself! Good idea and execution. I need one for my Kubota Tractor!

    Good point. I do wonder about the advisability of determining the tipping point of the machine while sitting in/upon it. With my tractor, my ears tell me when Im approaching that point (or at least, I make that assumption and go to level ground promptly).

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  • Upcycled Rocket Stove Griddle BBQ + Pizza Oven Attachment

    First off - Great Job! Both the Build and the Instructable.Second - Love the phrase 'material based design' - been doing it all my 'dumpster diving' life!Question: It appeared that the radiator was two sections, I wondered if they could have been re-oriented ninety degrees (one to the other) so as to channel the exhaust gases left and right (to the exhaust vents at the top rear).Thanks for teh efforts at sharing.

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  • Wi-Fi Smart Scale (with ESP8266, Arduino IDE, Adafruit.io and IFTTT)

    "so you can see how the weight changes with time"Oh, come on now, we all know how our weight has changed over time ;)

    1. Were those the smallest sensors you could find? 2. If you moved the display or eliminated it entirely, how small could you make the transmitting circuitry? (not looking for the theoretical limit, rather what you could do with the parts available - off the shelf - as was done here)

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  • Movable Dock, Lego Style Brick Legs,  Under $300 Part I

    "Oh, use nails when possible"Funny, I would think SS Deck Screws would be preferable - esp if dismantling the project was a consideration.

    Nice project. Curious to understand why you went with the fence pickets and then with two-by material for the rest. Given you tightened up the spacing, wouldn't deck boards have served as well as the two-by-six's? Use 2 bys on the perimeter and deck boards on the 'inside.' A fellow had a pool float project made of Pool Noodles that were 5' long. He joined them into 10' lengths with a (short) piece of rubber hose or PVC pipe. In this case, the long 'channels' formed by the spacing between your support beams/boards would serve to contain eight or ten of the pool noodles with a resulting increase in buoyancy - a floating dock? Or is the water level a constant in your pond?

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  • Floating Wet Lounger Water Pad/raft for 6, Under $100

    It might prove worth your while to determine what your pool noodles are made of. With that information, you might find a suitable adhesive. "A pool noodle is a cylindrical piece of buoyantpolyethylene foam" Wikipedia Pick The Right Glue For The Job: How to Select Adhesives For Bonding Foam https://www.thefoamfactory.com

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  • How to CORRECTLY Braze (SILVER SOLDER) a Copper Pipe

    "This from Wikipedia" A source worth checking, of course. However no certainty that the information there is perfect. Best find an authoritative source or two to cite as primary sources when you can. In this case, the wiki worked.Then again, he could use PEX ;)

    Interestingly enough, TOH would suggest the MAPP Gas Kit might be a bit too hot for 1/2" and smaller copper fittings (soldering): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQMHwthAlrM

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  • How to CORRECTLY Braze (SILVER SOLDER) a Copper Pipe

    "Something else you might wanna consider is" English perhaps?It is also polite to link to or reference your sources. (Saves comments like the fellow who thought "... you started off incorrectly.") I like the following from https://www.copper.org/applications/plumbing/techc..."The most common method of joining copper tube is with the use of a socket-type, copper or copper alloy fitting into which the tube sections are inserted and fastened by means of a filler metal, using either a soldering or brazing process. This type of joint is known as a capillary or lap joint because the socket of the fitting overlaps the tube end and a space is formed between the tube and the fitting. This space is called the capillary space. The surfaces of fitting and tube that overlap ...

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    "Something else you might wanna consider is" English perhaps?It is also polite to link to or reference your sources. (Saves comments like the fellow who thought "... you started off incorrectly.") I like the following from https://www.copper.org/applications/plumbing/techc..."The most common method of joining copper tube is with the use of a socket-type, copper or copper alloy fitting into which the tube sections are inserted and fastened by means of a filler metal, using either a soldering or brazing process. This type of joint is known as a capillary or lap joint because the socket of the fitting overlaps the tube end and a space is formed between the tube and the fitting. This space is called the capillary space. The surfaces of fitting and tube that overlap to form the joint are known as the faying surfaces. Tube and fitting are then solidly joined using a filler metal that is melted into the capillary space and adheres to these surfaces."The filler metal is a metal alloy that has a melting temperature below that of either the tube or fitting. The melting point of copper (Cu) alloy UNS C12200 is 1,981°F/1082°C. As such, the filler metals for soldering and brazing copper and copper alloy tube and fittings must have melting temperatures below this temperature."The basic difference between soldering and brazing is the temperature necessary to melt the filler metal. That temperature is defined to be 842ºF/450ºC by the American Welding Society (AWS) but is often rounded to 840ºF. If the filler metal melts below 840ºF the process being performed is soldering. Above that temperature, the process is brazing."Brazed joints are generally used to achieve higher joint strength or fatigue resistance. To accomplish this, filler metals stronger than those composed primarily of tin must be used. However, this increased strength generally comes from filler metals made of materials that melt at higher temperatures. The brazing temperatures for most of the brazing alloys used to joint copper piping systems (BCuP and BAg alloys see below) are roughly between 1,150°F/621°C and 1,550°F/843°C."The most commonly used brazing filler metal types, used to join copper tube and fittings fall into two distinct categories:BCuP Alloy (pronounced b-cup) - where the B stands for Brazing, Cu is the chemical symbol for Copper, and P is the chemical symbol for Phosphorous. Therefore, a BCuP brazing alloy is primarily a copper-phosphorous brazing alloy that may contain from 0%-30% Silver (Ag).BAg Alloy (pronounced bag) - where the B stands for Brazing and Ag is the chemical symbol for Silver. While there are other elements found in BAg alloys besides silver, the majority of BAg alloys may contain silver content of anywhere between 24% and 93%.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on jgaffney3's instructable The Wrong Way to Make a River Table8 months ago
    The Wrong Way to Make a River Table

    There's a song titled "Muddy River," no? And a Musician "Muddy Rivers?" And a Mississippi (Big Muddy) River. And at least on Song lyric 'muddy river.'Now we have a Muddy Rivers Table

    I wonder, too, if keeping the form "WARM" with a heat source (NOT AN OPEN FLAME) below the work, would have had the effect of raising any bubbles to the surface / eliminating bubbles?I built a darkroom sink in 1971 using fiberglass resin to 'FLOAT' the bottom of the sink. As I recall, there were no bubbles. Nor can I recall ever doing anything to prevent them. I did embed a coin in the resin. I think the resulting color was a bit green. BTW, if you build such a sink, elevate the end with the drain before flooding the form with resin. Then, when you're done and the sink is leveled during the install, fluids will flow toward the drain.

    Never fail! It's not a failed attempt at a River Table, rather a successful attempt at a burnt resin finish resulting in a Muddy Rivers Casual Table - Or a Smithfield Bacon Breakfast Table.As often as not, the art we celebrate may be nothing like the intention that gave it birth - and almost certainly not exactly what was planned.

    Well, in this case, I think the "One learns more from one's mistakes than success' " might prove more apt.And, isn;t it all to often the fact that the lesson learned from one's enemies is the last learned?

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  • How to Build a Simple and Strong Miter Saw Station

    "Place your miter saw in the center of the middle shelf with the handle sticking out the front for easy movement and then attach using long screws or lag bolts depending on the size of your mounting holes."One concern would be the plane of the saw bas relative to those of the tables at either side. When cutting long stock, so much of the material is supported by one or both table surfaces that it is difficult to position the material flush to the saw base and back supports.It may be wise to elevate the saw table relative to the extension(s) so that LONG STOCK is not influenced by 'distortions' in the side extensions/tables.I tried building mine precisely in the same plain - then the weather changed and the wood followed suite!Man proposes, God disposes.

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  • Bent Laminated Bench From a Sheet of Plywood

    With Plywood, the grain alternates roughly 90 degrees with each layer, thus about half of the thickness of any strip, has the grain running perpendicular to the length of the piece thus amenable to such a bending.The Design is an unfaithful copy of one done using solid wood (Oak?) strips which is a very old approach to 'curving' wood forms that offers the benefit of greater strength than might be had using strips of plywood in such a configuration. See the inspiration/original at https://youtu.be/1frUIQcIg8U

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  • DIY Camper Van Conversion Bed Build, Bed Converts to a Couch! #VANLIFE

    Well, if it is practical you find impressive, how about my other invention "Lowpost Bubble Wrap?" By filling the bubble wrap with helium (they would not approve the Hydrogen-filled prototypes) we were able to reduce the postage costs to nil.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on Kink Jarfold's instructable I MADE a DADO JIG8 months ago
    I MADE a DADO JIG

    With a 1/4" od 5/16" straight bit, you could use this jig to create the slots used to adjust a jig like this! Then, you wouldn't need Fender Washers!Nice instructable. Using the click-lock flooring - brilliant! I knew there was a reason I saved that extra flooring.By the way, I used the excess kitchen flooring to finish the toe-kicks in our last kitchen - worked very well.

    Mine said "Watch the pennies and the dollars will take care of themselves." Had a thought. One of the rails that guide the router can move to allow adjusting the dado width. The support that lines the jig up with the board to be 'dadoed' is fixed and square on one end/side. The other/opposite support 'hangs out there' unless the board being cut is wide enough.However, if you cut slots on the one side of the rails, you could slide the 'other/opposite' support flush to the board being 'dadoed.' IMHO, this would make the jig more stable.BTW - the bit I see in your router appears to be a half-inch roundover. Ar you using a top-bearing bit to cut the dados? Since your router base has a 'flat' spot, guiding it using the base might prove problematic. With a tpo bearing bit, the edg...

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    Mine said "Watch the pennies and the dollars will take care of themselves." Had a thought. One of the rails that guide the router can move to allow adjusting the dado width. The support that lines the jig up with the board to be 'dadoed' is fixed and square on one end/side. The other/opposite support 'hangs out there' unless the board being cut is wide enough.However, if you cut slots on the one side of the rails, you could slide the 'other/opposite' support flush to the board being 'dadoed.' IMHO, this would make the jig more stable.BTW - the bit I see in your router appears to be a half-inch roundover. Ar you using a top-bearing bit to cut the dados? Since your router base has a 'flat' spot, guiding it using the base might prove problematic. With a tpo bearing bit, the edge of the bearing is 'at' the edge of the bit (same plane) so setting the guides to the width of the board meant to fit into the dado, gives you a dado the width of the board used to set teh jig.

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  • USB FOAM CUTTER - USB STYROFOAM CUTTER

    Of course, there is no need for threads at all as all the fittings shown are available as SLIP fittings. The Elbows (as we call them in Texas) can be glued in place and the other two fittings would not need to be secured at all (given the design shown).I would look into the idea of installing a PUSH TO CLOSE switch on the 'handle' part of the foam cutter positioned so that it could be operated by a thumb. With such a switch, one could never forget to turn it off when not in use!

    "The threads can be made by . . ." buying risers instead of pipe. Orbit Brand (example) http://cdn6.bigcommerce.com/s-jmii6ithyk/products/310/images/553/38083_2__76815.1489797262.500.659.jpg?c=2 a "1" x 12" PVC Sprinkler Head Riser Pipe Irrigation System Nipple - 38232" They come in various lengths from about 3" to 24"

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  • DIY Camper Van Conversion Bed Build, Bed Converts to a Couch! #VANLIFE

    Two 4x8 sheets of 3/32" "doors skin" plywood will weigh less than half that of a 1/2" sheet of plywood. If you've never built one (torsion box), it may be hard to imagine the difference in weight - you can get an idea by checking out the hollow-core doors at Lowes or Home Depot or search Torsion Box Designs on the web.Yes, the labor is a bit more intensive - creating an interlocking lattice work of interior 'ribs' is different but simple and straight forwards - and the results are worth the extra planning and effort.Everything you build into that van increases the load and thus increases the cost of operation. You could achieve something similar by gluing the plywood to foam boards instead of the interior lattice work - possibly not as strong, but enough for the inte...

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    Two 4x8 sheets of 3/32" "doors skin" plywood will weigh less than half that of a 1/2" sheet of plywood. If you've never built one (torsion box), it may be hard to imagine the difference in weight - you can get an idea by checking out the hollow-core doors at Lowes or Home Depot or search Torsion Box Designs on the web.Yes, the labor is a bit more intensive - creating an interlocking lattice work of interior 'ribs' is different but simple and straight forwards - and the results are worth the extra planning and effort.Everything you build into that van increases the load and thus increases the cost of operation. You could achieve something similar by gluing the plywood to foam boards instead of the interior lattice work - possibly not as strong, but enough for the intended application.

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  • DIY Camper Van Conversion Bed Build, Bed Converts to a Couch! #VANLIFE

    "The bed platform"Needn't use 1/2" plywood - way too heavy! Try that 5/32?? "Door Skin" stuff at Lowes or HD and glue up a torsion box - assuming you wanted it that thick, use the 2x2's but cut them down to 2x1" for the perimeter and 2 x 1/4" for the interior supports and use more of them. Actually, you could use corrugated cardboard for the interior. The weight reduction will prove significant and the strength will be equal or better. Then, if you use an air mattress and fill it with helium, just think of the gas you'll save!

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on randofo's instructable IPhone Camera Spinner8 months ago
    IPhone Camera Spinner

    Yes, I understand that. Lord knows how many times I've balanced the tires on a vehicle. There is also an issue of the plane of the spinning disc - think of balancing tires and weights on the inside and outside of the wheel. Since we can assume all Iphones are the same dimensions printing a 'disc' with two, three or four Iphone pockets seemed a very simple approach.I suspect that balancing with any other counter-weight could require considerable trial and error, no? Then there's the issue of how to fasten the counter weight where it needs to be as well.Hey, what happened to all those folks who couldn't understand the value of building this contraption?It is not always the result - often it is the process!

    Ah, yes, a counterweight. Now, where might you get something that weighed in at exactly as many grams as an Iphone? Hmmm, It is a puzzlement, Yes?If I had Autodesk, I wonder if I could design a case that would hold an Iphone and provide a hole to allow the camera to 'see' while the Iphone was in its holder. Maybe a case that could hold three Iphones arrayed about a central point on some sort of circular disk with the openings of the three holders oriented toward the center of the disk so that, as the disk spun, centrifugal forces pressed the Iphones securely into their respective pockets. Three, three, three simultaneous silly spinning videos at once! By its nature the disk could be printed such that the central point was thicker - thick enough to support an armature that would 'lock' i...

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    Ah, yes, a counterweight. Now, where might you get something that weighed in at exactly as many grams as an Iphone? Hmmm, It is a puzzlement, Yes?If I had Autodesk, I wonder if I could design a case that would hold an Iphone and provide a hole to allow the camera to 'see' while the Iphone was in its holder. Maybe a case that could hold three Iphones arrayed about a central point on some sort of circular disk with the openings of the three holders oriented toward the center of the disk so that, as the disk spun, centrifugal forces pressed the Iphones securely into their respective pockets. Three, three, three simultaneous silly spinning videos at once! By its nature the disk could be printed such that the central point was thicker - thick enough to support an armature that would 'lock' into the printed disk as it fit the depressions printed into the 'front' of the disk and was held tightly by a reversed threaded nut on the rear. Similarly, ridges radiating outward from the center (both faces) printed into the disk (maybe a Carbon Fiber Printer?) would add rigidity w/o adding weight.Now, the best way to project these images . . . Well, first, let's see how your kickstarter works out before I design the projector.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on Fishers Shop's instructable Waving American Flag8 months ago
    Waving American Flag

    Wow! Worth the effort to make one! Patent the design before we see them with a Made With Cheap Labor Label!Given the thickness of the project, maybe a French Cleat to hang it? Just rout out a DADO(?) along the back and finish off the top with the dovetail bit used to create the hanger/cleat.By the way, that little green Planer Accessory Material Catcher is cool. I didn't see that option when I bought my DeWalt 735!A couple of edits: "Do your best to stay on the line when cutting," Stay on the Waste Side of the line, No? "(there's 6 of them)" or (there're 6 of them) or, better yet (there are 6)Really good job and video. Arbortech owes you! Next time, when to give the model number of a product Add "SF" or "FS" to the model number/description &q...

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    Wow! Worth the effort to make one! Patent the design before we see them with a Made With Cheap Labor Label!Given the thickness of the project, maybe a French Cleat to hang it? Just rout out a DADO(?) along the back and finish off the top with the dovetail bit used to create the hanger/cleat.By the way, that little green Planer Accessory Material Catcher is cool. I didn't see that option when I bought my DeWalt 735!A couple of edits: "Do your best to stay on the line when cutting," Stay on the Waste Side of the line, No? "(there's 6 of them)" or (there're 6 of them) or, better yet (there are 6)Really good job and video. Arbortech owes you! Next time, when to give the model number of a product Add "SF" or "FS" to the model number/description "TurboPlane Model FS-9 from ArborTech." That way, when the customers call, chat or write because they "can't find it on the web site," the vendor will know whence the orders are coming from.

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  • How to Make a SOFA That Turns Into a BED

    - Detailed Plans: https://gumroad.com/diycreators- (6) 2 by 12 Southern yellow pine - (5) 2 by 3 lumber - (6) 1 by 4 lumber - 1/2in dowels - lots Screws - Wood GlueSo, yes there is a B.O.M. and No, there isn't either as the writer offers but two of the three dimensions expected!

    If you look at the approach again and, then imagine what you are suggesting, the answer should be obvious. The 4x1" slats, would need to be almost as long as the couch is wide and, thus offer precious little support to a mattress - not raise the question "Where would one find a mattress that long! Short answer "No!"

    Very well done video and build.Heavy, however!As to the screws at the back, simply fasten and clamp the pieces together then, instead of drilling for the screws, drill for half-inch dowels. Then glue it up and pound 1/2" dowels to line it up and hold it together. Cut the dowels a bit long, then sand them flat after the glue dries. No screws showing, no screw holes to cover/fill. One small addition to the 'pull-out' slats might be a piece of 1" stock fit to the underneath of each P-O Slat such that it would catch on the front support rail when the front was pulled out to 'The Max.' If you wanted to remove the P-O section completely, you would simply tilt it up to clear the 'stops.'

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on dedehai's instructable Batteryless Bicycle Safety Light 9 months ago
    Batteryless Bicycle Safety Light

    First thing I thought of was adding a capacitor - before I read the Instructable through! Then I saw, in the comments where someone else had the same thought and it was hashed out. It appeared that it could be done, though it was argued, not to any great effect. Admittedly, I was under the impression that such an addition might 'extend the blinks.' Not provide 'continuous illumination," but extend the 'on' time created with each pass of the magnet.I did not realize that the magnet would generate pulses of opposing polarity with each pass. I suspect the addition of a diode would eliminate the second (reverse) pulse as one suggested would be required to add a capacitor.I love the idea of recycling the relay - brilliant! I missed the discussion on the differences between a 12VDC and 5...

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    First thing I thought of was adding a capacitor - before I read the Instructable through! Then I saw, in the comments where someone else had the same thought and it was hashed out. It appeared that it could be done, though it was argued, not to any great effect. Admittedly, I was under the impression that such an addition might 'extend the blinks.' Not provide 'continuous illumination," but extend the 'on' time created with each pass of the magnet.I did not realize that the magnet would generate pulses of opposing polarity with each pass. I suspect the addition of a diode would eliminate the second (reverse) pulse as one suggested would be required to add a capacitor.I love the idea of recycling the relay - brilliant! I missed the discussion on the differences between a 12VDC and 5VDC version as to which might be the most effective. Good job.

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  • How to Fix a Hole in a Hollow Core Door

    I went to the HD website and priced the materials at $73 before tax. Then I priced a new door slab: Masonite 30 in. x 80 in. Textured 6-Panel Hollow Core Primed Composite Interior Door Slab Model# 16474 $31.98. (The smooth door was about four bucks less). *None the less, your craftsmanship is to be envied. One note about the foam filler/sealant, however. I would think the Window and Door variety the first choice for such an application as the Standard stuff has been known to move window and door jabs as it expands (making it difficult (impossible?) to open the window or close the door.) It also does well in moist environments (adhesion-wise) I've been told - so, spritzing a little water into the cavity to be filled should make for an even firmer fix.* replacing the door would require ...

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    I went to the HD website and priced the materials at $73 before tax. Then I priced a new door slab: Masonite 30 in. x 80 in. Textured 6-Panel Hollow Core Primed Composite Interior Door Slab Model# 16474 $31.98. (The smooth door was about four bucks less). *None the less, your craftsmanship is to be envied. One note about the foam filler/sealant, however. I would think the Window and Door variety the first choice for such an application as the Standard stuff has been known to move window and door jabs as it expands (making it difficult (impossible?) to open the window or close the door.) It also does well in moist environments (adhesion-wise) I've been told - so, spritzing a little water into the cavity to be filled should make for an even firmer fix.* replacing the door would require matching and mortising hinge locations.

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  • Build a Hover Craft in Less Than an Hour!

    "Aidan said will always remember this."Poor grammar - "Kaleb, Camden and I will always remember this."Because one would not say "me will always remember this."Neat project.Not sure you needed to cut that 'ring out of another 34" square sheet of plywood, however. Why not use simple strips?Also, why no sealant between the tarp and the top of the plywood it was folded onto?I've got an old leaf blower and some plywood . . . hmmm

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  • Reclaimed Lumber Scalable-size Wood Kiln

    "...I dumbly assumed they were empty."Maybe there were eggs laid and the little mothers had left?

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  • Wi-Fi Smart Scale (with ESP8266, Arduino IDE, Adafruit.io and IFTTT)

    "RFID card, fingerprint"First is PassiveSecond is Active, Opt-inApplication requires differentiating as between two members of the same household using the same scale.

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  • Wi-Fi Smart Scale (with ESP8266, Arduino IDE, Adafruit.io and IFTTT)

    "logic, base on the expected weight of each user,"Yes, that was the best solution I came up with as well.If you place the screen up high enough, a user could select his (or her) colored button or digit I suppose.Difficult to implant a chip in a customer via Amazon, so I had to scrap that idea right off the bat.

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  • Wi-Fi Smart Scale (with ESP8266, Arduino IDE, Adafruit.io and IFTTT)

    Wood working Contest! Or, did I read that wrong?The WiFi aspect of this project piqued my interest. I have long labored under the impression that data from a device such as this one you've created (and the two commercial versions linked to - thanks) could be sent to a Google Apps Database on the net so that daily readings, for instance, might be stored over time and analyzed at will.Is this essentially what you've programmed?I read the specs provided by the Xiaomi and Lenovo units you provided links to. They seemed to depend upon a proprietary app as opposed to the sort of generic solution using freely available software tools I was hoping might be done.Have you thought of how to program the device such that two or three uses might use the same scale? Husband and wife, perhaps. How to f...

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    Wood working Contest! Or, did I read that wrong?The WiFi aspect of this project piqued my interest. I have long labored under the impression that data from a device such as this one you've created (and the two commercial versions linked to - thanks) could be sent to a Google Apps Database on the net so that daily readings, for instance, might be stored over time and analyzed at will.Is this essentially what you've programmed?I read the specs provided by the Xiaomi and Lenovo units you provided links to. They seemed to depend upon a proprietary app as opposed to the sort of generic solution using freely available software tools I was hoping might be done.Have you thought of how to program the device such that two or three uses might use the same scale? Husband and wife, perhaps. How to fix it so the device distinguished between the two and uploaded the data to the respective web app.

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  • Easy Outdoor Cinder Block Benches

    The Geometry/Symmetry is outstanding - eye-catching. Color scheme does not hurt either!Your wrote a line that caught my eye as well: "Again, if you only overlap the posts by the max depth of the circular saw, you can avoid this step."Frankly, if the saw's depth of cut is less than one-half the thickness of the lumber, you cannot create a half-lap joint at all.Check to see if your saw will take a 7.5" blade some may take an eight-inch blade. Put the post up an sawhorses with the 'mating end to your RIGHT. Set the depth, then make the 'left-most" cut, then and other a quarter to 3/8" toward the end of the post and repeat until the next cut would be off the post.Take a hammer and hit the pieces left standing and they will fall away. Then take a chisel and 'clean u...

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    The Geometry/Symmetry is outstanding - eye-catching. Color scheme does not hurt either!Your wrote a line that caught my eye as well: "Again, if you only overlap the posts by the max depth of the circular saw, you can avoid this step."Frankly, if the saw's depth of cut is less than one-half the thickness of the lumber, you cannot create a half-lap joint at all.Check to see if your saw will take a 7.5" blade some may take an eight-inch blade. Put the post up an sawhorses with the 'mating end to your RIGHT. Set the depth, then make the 'left-most" cut, then and other a quarter to 3/8" toward the end of the post and repeat until the next cut would be off the post.Take a hammer and hit the pieces left standing and they will fall away. Then take a chisel and 'clean up' the lap by removing what remains. Search Cutting Half-Lap Joints on YouTube several examples there.

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  • How to Flatten Boards With Just a Planer

    Well, I don't have the Engineering answer either. But the torsion box is (pound for pound) more rigid than a solid piece of the same material as a Steel Tube is more rigid than a Steel Rod.

    "The key is getting that box beam rigid enough." Look at Torsion Box Construction. I've built large (door sized) platforms using light weight 'Door Skins' over a torsion box interior with great results. The interior pieces I used were 1/4" x 1" x Length and I used 1" x 1" x Length for the 'outside' edges.

    Don't get that MDF near a humid environment or store it wrong! Better to use OSB Flooring than MDF if you must ignore the Torsion Box idea. His torsion box was a really simple version. He could have made one as wide as his DeWalt planer bed - 12" or so. Then he might have used six thin strips of birch plywood evenly spaced within: Look at: http://www.finewoodworking.com/2007/05/15/build-a-... for one large T-box and, the way I built mine here: For something that is just 12" wide, all the materials can be scaled down accordingly.

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  • Glass Roof Pergola for Less Than £300!

    Home Depot: Palruf 26 in. x 12 ft. Clear PVC Roofing PanelModel# 100427(39)$22.47Suntuf 26 in. x 6 ft. Polycarbonate Roof Panel in ClearModel# 155030(172)$15.35Suntuf 24 in. Horizontal Plastic Closure Strips (6-Pack)Model# 92770(122)$5.47 /bagSuntuf 24 in. Universal Plastic Closure Strips (6-Pack)Model# 92772(47)$5.47 /baghttps://www.instructables.com/id/Glass-Roof-Pergola-for-Less-Than-300/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email

    Note that the edge of the 'glass' will cause water to drip along the front edge and (to some extent) tend to run up hill underneath and may get back onto the horizontal beam. Consider a 'drip edge and gutter system if rain is expected.

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