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  • condorsc commented on ToolNut's instructable Electrolytic Rust Removal Aka Magic1 year ago
    Electrolytic Rust Removal Aka Magic

    I have been electrolyzing found objects, Civil War artifacts, cannonballs and shells(properly disarmed), for over 40 years. I certainly recommend paying attention to the science and chemistry in this 'ible and the information sources the author cites. And, I apologize if I appear to be a know it all. Having said that, my experience has been different. I use ONLY salt. It does a great job, no problems I ever saw. You only need ONE sacrificial cathode, not several. I never heard of or experienced shadowing. I recommend using an old (American made) file. This way you can control the current going through the cathode. Just pull the file up a little if you want to slow down the process. Also, lasts MUCH longer than rebar. Salt solution takes perhaps 2-3 hours to get funky and efficient. On w...

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    I have been electrolyzing found objects, Civil War artifacts, cannonballs and shells(properly disarmed), for over 40 years. I certainly recommend paying attention to the science and chemistry in this 'ible and the information sources the author cites. And, I apologize if I appear to be a know it all. Having said that, my experience has been different. I use ONLY salt. It does a great job, no problems I ever saw. You only need ONE sacrificial cathode, not several. I never heard of or experienced shadowing. I recommend using an old (American made) file. This way you can control the current going through the cathode. Just pull the file up a little if you want to slow down the process. Also, lasts MUCH longer than rebar. Salt solution takes perhaps 2-3 hours to get funky and efficient. On wrought iron the process takes off all bad metal, no wire brushing, etc. needed. Example, I cleaned a complete dug Enfield Rifle lock this way and every stamping was clearly readable. Just rinse item off and dry with a hair dryer. This article was sold perhaps 15 years later, great condition, no rerusting, no oil, wire brushing, etc. Be careful with cast iron, go slow. If you overdo it, it will get soft, almost soft enough to carve with a knife. A trickle charger with overload protection operating at low amperage is what you want. If you want less than 2 amps, just pull the file up a little. The funkier the salt solution, the better it works. But I always changed it when it got really nasty. If cleaning a two- or three-piece iron or steel item, it's sometimes better to have two or three leads going to the object. As I understand it, this is not reduction. Perhaps the author can explain if soda accomplishes reduction(conversion of corrosion back to good metal). I once read an article where immersing a non-ferrous artifact wrapped in a woven metallic blanket in an acid(I believe) visibly converted corrosion to good metal and preserved detail. I would sure like to read some comments on this. Again, please allow this intrusion into an excellent 'ible.

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  • How To: Restore an Axe- Two Tone Handle/Leather Sheath

    Yeah, Steve Martin did the same thing. Like yours, his Ax occupied the same space!

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  • condorsc commented on kludge77's instructable Mosquito in Amber Prop Replica2 years ago
    Mosquito in Amber Prop Replica

    Awesome polish job! Try a wood rasp to turn polyester, it should do much better than the tools used. Lucite is usually what's used for projects like this, have you ever tried it? Can it be dyed?

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  • condorsc commented on yuwentwiggychen's instructable How to French Polish2 years ago
    How to French Polish

    Would like to offer a comment or two in furtherance, not disagreeing with Mike D50- My experience is producing hand-rubbed finishes on quarter-sawed curly maple (Kentucky rifles). Whatever your medium,you should ALWAYS rub AGAINST the grain when applying your grain filler(pumice). Rubbing with Xs and Os will drag some of the filler out of the grain. I look forward to trying this method of finishing. Evidently French Polish produces a lower luster polish, as pumice colored with stain and rubbed into the grain crossways, then after it's thoroughly dry, hand-rubbed (using the ball of the thumb and/or the thumb itself), with boiled linseed oil, will produce a mirror sheen which absolutely looks like a high-gloss lacquer or shellac finish. I don't see how one could produce a higher sheen . ...

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    Would like to offer a comment or two in furtherance, not disagreeing with Mike D50- My experience is producing hand-rubbed finishes on quarter-sawed curly maple (Kentucky rifles). Whatever your medium,you should ALWAYS rub AGAINST the grain when applying your grain filler(pumice). Rubbing with Xs and Os will drag some of the filler out of the grain. I look forward to trying this method of finishing. Evidently French Polish produces a lower luster polish, as pumice colored with stain and rubbed into the grain crossways, then after it's thoroughly dry, hand-rubbed (using the ball of the thumb and/or the thumb itself), with boiled linseed oil, will produce a mirror sheen which absolutely looks like a high-gloss lacquer or shellac finish. I don't see how one could produce a higher sheen . There's nothing there but pumice, stain, and linseed oil! Slow and painful though because of the heat of the friction. The craftsmen producing hand-rubbed tables, etc. have to be using a slightly different method-the method I describe is SLOW and PAINFUL.

    "Oil finish" refers to linseed oil?

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  • condorsc commented on QuackMasterDan's instructable Tesseract Infinity Desk2 years ago
    Tesseract Infinity Desk

    Loved your Instructable. You know the two-mirror effect where you see the same image from up close out to infinity, reflected countless times? Do you know of any notable examples, or any instructables on it? I once saw one that used an upright surface, a neon tube figure, and a plastic cover. It was absolutely stunning. Have you ever done anything like that, or know where I can find an example? I know neon is hard to do, and you have to find someone to fill it. Wo8uld an led source do? Thanks.

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  • condorsc commented on tgdula's instructable A knife from a shot out M1 rifle2 years ago
    A knife from a shot out M1 rifle

    Actually, Kukris have a double notch, and it s purpose is to denote something, either religious or tribal affiliation.Can't remember what.

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  • condorsc commented on watchmeflyy's instructable Wooden Gear Trains2 years ago
    Wooden Gear Trains

    The main problem would be energy transmission, converting coil spring energy to rotary energy. There are only two choices- an escapement or a weight-driven system, like a grandfather clock, but of course smaller.

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  • How to Make a Personalized Epoxy Resin Coaster

    When I was in Hawaii years ago I came across an article on enclosing orchids in clear plastic(Don't remember what type). There was a large orchid-growing industry in or near Hilo, on the big island. Someone had devoted considerable time developing this process. It too was hampered by the high water content in Orchids.But supposedly it was successful. Perhaps someone could research this.

    Sure. In fact, castable lucite is usually used for this sort of thing. As for epoxy, with a little practice one can repair broken lips, etc. on OLD bottles, etc. Just have to get the color right. Almost undetectable if you do it right.

    Jewelry supply houses sell jeweler's rouge for polishing plastic, lucite, epoxy, etc. Easily obtained.

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  • condorsc commented on wordsnwood's instructable Epoxy -vs- Tshirt = Artwork2 years ago
    Epoxy -vs- Tshirt = Artwork

    Contact an Art Dept. or two at a Univ., a craft shop open to the public, or a manufacturing jeweler. They will have a vacuum device which will remove the bubbles from the resin. Due to size, you may have to rig a bigger housing to cover the t-shirt.

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