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  • Tear It Up and Tape It - Middle School Flower Dissection Lab

    Thank you so much! I would love to hear what you have done with your sixth grade and 1st/2nd grade students. I am always looking for cool ways to collaborate with younger grades since my students really seem to love the entire process. I did a collaborative project a number of years ago where my students wrote books about the moon's cyclical patterns, moon's geology, and Earth's seasons. They illustrated them and made them fun to read to a younger group of students. We then got the kids together in groups to read to second grade students and did a little Q&A at the end to see what they learned. It was a fantastic project (See attached examples) and really was a lot of fun but did require a fair amount of ELA work with the story outline and revisions. I ended up enlisting the help of...

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    Thank you so much! I would love to hear what you have done with your sixth grade and 1st/2nd grade students. I am always looking for cool ways to collaborate with younger grades since my students really seem to love the entire process. I did a collaborative project a number of years ago where my students wrote books about the moon's cyclical patterns, moon's geology, and Earth's seasons. They illustrated them and made them fun to read to a younger group of students. We then got the kids together in groups to read to second grade students and did a little Q&A at the end to see what they learned. It was a fantastic project (See attached examples) and really was a lot of fun but did require a fair amount of ELA work with the story outline and revisions. I ended up enlisting the help of the ELA teachers with it. Thanks for the nudge to enter the instructable into the tape contest!

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  • Ripp'n Wheel'n Spin'n Wheel for the Classroom

    Thank you so much. I say it all the time to the kids, "if I am not having fun, I am sure that they are not". I try to keep it interactive in the class as much as possible and it is great to know that there are others out there who appreciate the efforts. Thanks again!

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  • Solar Powered, Bike Frame Pottery Wheel

    Really cool build. I particularly like how you used so many up-cycled materials throughout the project. I was wondering if you could use a 1-1/8" pipe passed through the head tube with the bearings chased on to it. You could then use a threaded flange on the end of the pipe to attach your wheel. I am currently building a banding wheel using a bike hub and some other recycled parts and you definitely got me thinking about something fun for this summer.

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  • Ripp'n Wheel'n Spin'n Wheel for the Classroom

    Thank you so much and I am happy that I brought back some good memories from middle school... you don't always hear about too many good memories from middle school :)I feel that if you find a way to make the moments more memorable for the students you can more easily make lifelong connections with them and make the lessons all that much better. Thanks again for the comment!

    Thank you so much, that really means a lot to me.

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    • Ripp'n Wheel'n Spin'n Wheel for the Classroom
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      4 comments
  • ctstarkdesigns commented on RMeierIcloud's instructable Ballista Catapult 12 days ago
    Ballista Catapult

    Excellent work, Ryan! Great job using other sources to help design your ballista. Keep up the great work with all of your instructables.

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  • Ripp'n Wheel'n Spin'n Wheel for the Classroom

    Thank you! I have a blast making all of them and have many more on the way! - Chris

    Thank you. I think the students are going to love using them.

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  • Hot Stuff! - Building a Wood Fired Oven at Home

    I believe that they are 4" wide bricks. I can't remember the other options we had but these were the best fit for the size we were building and would make it so we didn't need to cut any of the brick, avoiding any health considerations.

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  • Hot Stuff! - Building a Wood Fired Oven at Home

    Interesting ideas but I am unsure about the cost comparison vs. insulating capabilities between the two options. I wore a mask and glasses with long sleeves and had no ill harm from the ceramic blanket.

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  • Hot Stuff! - Building a Wood Fired Oven at Home

    I believe you need to own some specific equipment to make aircrete (https://www.domegaia.com/how-to-make-aircrete.html) or you need to manufacture your own equipment. We did not have any future plans to use aircrete so buying/making the equipment was out of the question. I bet it would work well though and I do wonder what the comparison is between the R-values of the aircrete and the perlite concrete mix.

    Hi Scott,If my wife is setting up for the farmer's market she will start to fire the oven early in the morning at about 6am. The oven will be at temperature (1200F) to begin making pitas on the bricks at about 8am. She will keep a live fire going in the oven for this period of time so that she can add more wood to it to continue to allow the clay to saturate. She will remove all of the ash and coal from the oven. By about 10am she is ready to start putting bread into the oven and will bake approximately 20 - 30 loaves of ciabatta, pane rustico, and the like. By this point she has to pack up for the market around noon. The oven is still at a perfect temperature (400F) to bake more bread or toss in a chicken with vegetables and water in a cast iron roasting pot and let bake for a couple o...

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    Hi Scott,If my wife is setting up for the farmer's market she will start to fire the oven early in the morning at about 6am. The oven will be at temperature (1200F) to begin making pitas on the bricks at about 8am. She will keep a live fire going in the oven for this period of time so that she can add more wood to it to continue to allow the clay to saturate. She will remove all of the ash and coal from the oven. By about 10am she is ready to start putting bread into the oven and will bake approximately 20 - 30 loaves of ciabatta, pane rustico, and the like. By this point she has to pack up for the market around noon. The oven is still at a perfect temperature (400F) to bake more bread or toss in a chicken with vegetables and water in a cast iron roasting pot and let bake for a couple of hours. By the evening the oven is still right around the 300F - 350F mark and can be used to bake anything that works at that temperature. Everything you put into the oven will ultimately tax the saturated heat you built up in the oven but by the following morning the oven is usually at 250F and you can now take your chicken remnants and bones and make a killer broth for soup. By that evening the oven is still over 200 degrees and you can proof bread to be baked indoors or do other low temp cookings. The following day the oven is typically at a perfect temperature to dehydrate food or even make yogurt. And by the fourth day the oven is in the lower hundreds, which is perfect for dehydrating vegetables and fruits. Hope this helps you out!Chris

    Thank you! I hope you enjoy building your own oven!

    Any time! I am happy to help out.

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  • Apple Press and Apple Grinder - on the Cheap

    I used 3/4" wide by 1/2" thick pieces of maple, birch, and cherry that I had left over in my shop. I cut the strips to be 16" long and then laid them out side by side with 1/2" spacing between each one until they totaled 16" of width together (you might need to adjust the spacing between each one a bit. Then I put the next layer on top perpendicular to the first with the same spacing. I then used a nail gun and stainless steel staples to tack all of the intersections together. What results is a grid with 1/2" spacing that can be used in any orientation. Hope this helps out.

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  • Hot Stuff! - Building a Wood Fired Oven at Home

    You are so welcome! The pita bread is amazing and is so cool to watch cook. Good luck with your build.

    I checked out your instructable, really cool build. I like you reused the outdoor fireplace foundation. It is a beast of an oven and I bet you get a heck of a lot of heat retention in there. About how many loaves of bread can you bake with one firing?

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  • Hot Stuff! - Building a Wood Fired Oven at Home

    Thank you so much for the truly kind compliments. I really love writing these and enjoy sharing my experiences... while talking a bit about science too! I have a few more instructables in the wings and hopefully will have them posted in the near future.

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    • Hot Stuff! - Building a Wood Fired Oven at Home
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  • Hot Stuff! - Building a Wood Fired Oven at Home

    You are welcome, and thanks for the kind comment. Keep the dream alive and the fire burning!

    Thanks so much, Fi. I am certain that there are some definite benefits to having a very specific ratio in mind and some of that detail was given in Stu's book. We ended up following his recommendations for what he called a medium/large wood fired oven, and although he did talk about ratios, we were able to use his proportions pretty directly. We took a number of liberties with the insulating methods and materials but otherwise followed the actual oven specs pretty closely. I will check in his book and get the exact numbers if you like.Chris

    We definitely looked at some of the cheaper versions of this using cob, wine bottles, and various other items. Some of the ovens would cost only a mere $100 to build, and could be covered with a half of a 55 gallon barrel as a roof. Given normal wear and tear the thing could last for quite a while and would probably make a lot of bread and pizza and what not. Since my wife runs a small farmer's market based bakery we decided to invest more money into something that would be able to hold a constant temperature for a long time so that she could optimize baking many loaves of bread. With the hut over the oven and all other materials the total was under $1,000. For our application this made complete sense and we benefit from the after firing since the oven will remain at about 200 degrees f...

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    We definitely looked at some of the cheaper versions of this using cob, wine bottles, and various other items. Some of the ovens would cost only a mere $100 to build, and could be covered with a half of a 55 gallon barrel as a roof. Given normal wear and tear the thing could last for quite a while and would probably make a lot of bread and pizza and what not. Since my wife runs a small farmer's market based bakery we decided to invest more money into something that would be able to hold a constant temperature for a long time so that she could optimize baking many loaves of bread. With the hut over the oven and all other materials the total was under $1,000. For our application this made complete sense and we benefit from the after firing since the oven will remain at about 200 degrees for days after it was initially fired.

    Thanks!

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  • Apple Press and Apple Grinder - on the Cheap

    I like the sound of "scratter" much more... kind of gives the whole thing an identity different than other grinders. Luckily the grinding bit is way down in the box, we just need to kids to be more careful around the moving chains.

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  • Hot Stuff! - Building a Wood Fired Oven at Home

    I'd say we did more research than the average bear. All of my projects involve a long (some would say too long) period of research prior to purchasing materials and beginning the building process. All sizes and ratios were based on Stu's recommendations in his book, which is linked at the beginning of the instructable. His experience far outweighs most of the other information we found posted online since he has been building these ovens for so long. The door's height and dome are nearly identical if you look in the image where the initial doorway is built and sand is piled up. An external chimney still would lead to heat loss unless you had a fully insulated flue and chimney. The smoke in the eyes is only from the initial firing until you push the entire thing into the dome. At that po...

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    I'd say we did more research than the average bear. All of my projects involve a long (some would say too long) period of research prior to purchasing materials and beginning the building process. All sizes and ratios were based on Stu's recommendations in his book, which is linked at the beginning of the instructable. His experience far outweighs most of the other information we found posted online since he has been building these ovens for so long. The door's height and dome are nearly identical if you look in the image where the initial doorway is built and sand is piled up. An external chimney still would lead to heat loss unless you had a fully insulated flue and chimney. The smoke in the eyes is only from the initial firing until you push the entire thing into the dome. At that point the heat is so intense and convection so active that the smoke has no chance to go into your eyes and most of it is combusted due to the heat. By the time the fire is down and all that remains are hot coals there is no "smoke" only vapors, and you are not losing any energy to a chimney.

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  • Hot Stuff! - Building a Wood Fired Oven at Home

    Thank you so much for the truly kind comments. Happy to hear that you are interested in building one too, they are a blast to build and even more fun to use. Good luck and don't hesitate to reach out with questions.

    Hi there,So I left that out of the instructable since it really isn't necessary. I had some doubts about my masonary skills and a buddy of mine said he could make me a metal arch that fits in there to support it just in case. He made it in his shop and we installed it. Suffice to say, it wasn't necessary and I was just worrying about gravity not working anymore... the bricks can't go anywhere, gravity is pulling them all into place. But better safe than sorry I guess. Thanks for the comment and checking it out.

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