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  • erynmarch commented on erynmarch's instructable Natural Apple Pectin Stock2 years ago
    Natural Apple Pectin Stock

    man i hate wasting food, too. i totally understand.how did it turn out?

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  • erynmarch commented on erynmarch's instructable Natural Apple Pectin Stock2 years ago
    Natural Apple Pectin Stock

    Changing up recipes is hard! I think it takes a lot of trial and error to get what you want when you deviate from a recipe. I'm sure you're right about the humidity being a factor. Perhaps if you remove your waxed paper you could try your oven at its very lowest setting? If you need the paper to help keep it together try parchment paper so it can go in the oven if you try that. Does your oven have a convection option? Maybe try an hour and test it then try another hour and test... I don't want to give you advice that would make it worse. I bet it tastes fantastic regardless of how firm it is. I agree that your chef added pectin to keep the fresher peach flavor. That makes perfect sense to me.I don't think trying to reheat and add pectin again would be advisable, I would worry you'd end...

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    Changing up recipes is hard! I think it takes a lot of trial and error to get what you want when you deviate from a recipe. I'm sure you're right about the humidity being a factor. Perhaps if you remove your waxed paper you could try your oven at its very lowest setting? If you need the paper to help keep it together try parchment paper so it can go in the oven if you try that. Does your oven have a convection option? Maybe try an hour and test it then try another hour and test... I don't want to give you advice that would make it worse. I bet it tastes fantastic regardless of how firm it is. I agree that your chef added pectin to keep the fresher peach flavor. That makes perfect sense to me.I don't think trying to reheat and add pectin again would be advisable, I would worry you'd end up with a lumpy, chunky mess. Unless it's REALLY loose.I really do feel like we're about at the same skill level so don't take my advice as gospel. Just throwing out some ideas.I enjoy chatting with you, I hope whatever you're doing Saturday that you're making this for goes well. You can message me here on instructables anytime you like, or if you like look on Facebook for me at www.facebook.com/squirrelbrandgoods and send me a private message and I'll send you a personal email address. No pressure, not trying to be weird. just if you want to. I love talking about making food. Good luck Saturday and I hope you have a good weekend too!

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  • erynmarch commented on erynmarch's instructable Natural Apple Pectin Stock2 years ago
    Natural Apple Pectin Stock

    ok, lucky, i watched the video and looked up some recipes to cross-reference. first of all, my hat's off to you, persicata is exactly the kind of interesting food project i love to take on. i've never heard of it but it sounds delicious and it's high peach season here in georgia so i might need to give this a try. ; )anyway, most of the recipes i found don't call for pectin at all, so i'm thinking it's more of a fortification than something that is strictly necessary — kind of a guarantee or maybe a modern take on the old style so you're making something (somewhat) more like peach gummies than something like a block of quince like they serve with cheese in spain. it just looks so delicious.i'll stick by my advice from last night — since your apple pectin is really firm i'd w...

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    ok, lucky, i watched the video and looked up some recipes to cross-reference. first of all, my hat's off to you, persicata is exactly the kind of interesting food project i love to take on. i've never heard of it but it sounds delicious and it's high peach season here in georgia so i might need to give this a try. ; )anyway, most of the recipes i found don't call for pectin at all, so i'm thinking it's more of a fortification than something that is strictly necessary — kind of a guarantee or maybe a modern take on the old style so you're making something (somewhat) more like peach gummies than something like a block of quince like they serve with cheese in spain. it just looks so delicious.i'll stick by my advice from last night — since your apple pectin is really firm i'd warm it gently on its own until it's smooth so you don't have to worry about lumps of apple jelly in your peaches. if you're using as many peaches as the chef in your video, i'd go ahead and warm up a half pint's worth of pectin (about 8 oz.). if you want firmer persicata, maybe another quarter pint. i suspect the sugar and peaches on their own would firm up pretty well if you dried them in an oven on low like some of the recipes i found, but i think this recipe makes it more like a softer candy.i don't think the extra sugar in the pectin will be an issue, it shouldn't affect the recipe in a chemical sense. if you'd like you could reduce the amount of raw sugar to the peaches *just a bit* if you like, i don't think it will be unsafe. but you probably still need a good bit of sugar for it to set up properly. it seems like the kind of thing you might do this time and make notes and adjust next time if you'd like it a little firmer or softer.i feel like you're already an advanced cook so i feel silly giving you advice, but those are my thoughts. and i sure love discussing cooking of all types of things so thank you for this interesting conversation! let me know how it turns out!

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  • erynmarch commented on erynmarch's instructable Natural Apple Pectin Stock2 years ago
    Natural Apple Pectin Stock

    I'm so sorry I didn't answer yesterday! I hope you're not making the next step tonight, I want to read over what you're going to do next and give you the best advice I can. I burned my hand making dinner this evening and I can't type enough to help tonight. So far it sounds like you're in good shape! If you do go to the next stage tonight I suggest warming the pectin a bit so it's not lumpy when you add to the fruit. If it's really firm like you say you probably don't need a whole bunch of it. But hopefully you can wait, I'll check your recipe carefully tomorrow.

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  • erynmarch commented on erynmarch's instructable Natural Apple Pectin Stock2 years ago
    Natural Apple Pectin Stock

    hello, lucky!yes, i'm afraid the pectin recipe needs sugar, otherwise it will not set. the sugar and acid from the lemon juice together activate the natural pectin in the apples (and any other fruit).when first starting to use this pectin, i recommend searching for recipes that call for it instead of powdered or liquid pectin to get a feel for it. or if you do a lot of canning and don't mind a few batches not turning out perfect, you can just play around with other fruits. my rule of thumb for making any fruit preserve is 3 cups sugar to 3 lbs. fruit and the juice of one lemon. it's a safe general ratio. to try out this pectin you'd want to use a low acid fruit like strawberries or blackberries. once it reaches the magic 210 degrees setting temperature add a half cup of the pectin and s...

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    hello, lucky!yes, i'm afraid the pectin recipe needs sugar, otherwise it will not set. the sugar and acid from the lemon juice together activate the natural pectin in the apples (and any other fruit).when first starting to use this pectin, i recommend searching for recipes that call for it instead of powdered or liquid pectin to get a feel for it. or if you do a lot of canning and don't mind a few batches not turning out perfect, you can just play around with other fruits. my rule of thumb for making any fruit preserve is 3 cups sugar to 3 lbs. fruit and the juice of one lemon. it's a safe general ratio. to try out this pectin you'd want to use a low acid fruit like strawberries or blackberries. once it reaches the magic 210 degrees setting temperature add a half cup of the pectin and stir while continuing to cook until it is all dissolved. test the set and if it is not jelled enough ad another half cup. dissolve again and test the set. it should be setting by then and you can put in jars and process your preserves.as i mentioned at the beginning of the tutorial, the recipe is taken directly from a european master preserve maker's cookbook, "mes confitures." the problem with her book is that she does not speak english (it's translated) and doesn't elaborate much on the step-by-step process. but the recipes in her book call for this pectin in her other recipes in place of commercial pectins. she calls it "green apple jelly" i believe. for a comprehensive and more accessible book on preserving, you might look up paul virant's "the preservation kitchen" which also contains a recipe for apple pectin stock that contains less sugar. european style preserves are quite sweet, but chef virant's (american) recipes are somewhat less sugary. but it is important to remember when making preserves you should never randomly reduce the sugar in a recipe because the ratios of sugar to fruit to acid are what help prevent spoilage and/or dangerous microbes. if you want to make low sugar preserves you will need to find recipes specifically for that.thanks for reading my how-to and i hope you have good luck trying it out!eryn

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