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  • 4000 Pixel Animated LED Mural [Cheap and Simple*]

    Have you considered using one of the M4 boards from Adafruit? This one runs as 120Mhz and still uses the Arduino environment. I understand a lot of folks don't like the Arduino environment. But it works for me. It is not the 252Mhz of your PIC. But maybe it is enough?I really liked the project. I will also have to check out some of your other projects.Joe

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  • jperch commented on gzumwalt's instructable Ping Pong Popper4 months ago
    Ping Pong Popper

    Would it be possible for you to provide some ideas where I might be able to get the springs?Thanks,Joe

    Thanks, Greg.I only asked because I don't think I have ever really sought out a generic spring before. Kinda weird now that I think about it. Thanks again,Joe

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  • jperch commented on GreatScottLab's instructable Make Your Own LED Stroboscope6 months ago
    Make Your Own LED Stroboscope

    My guess would be to have the IRLZ44N turn on and off as fast as possible. I am further guessing that the stroboscopic effects depend on how fast you can turn on and off the LED's. According to the datasheet, this FET has a total gate charge of 48nC. I believe that driver is capable of providing up to 6A of drive current. This is significantly more than a typical Arduino output can provide. I believe driving the FET directly with an Arduino output would work as far as turning the LED's on and off. But you might notice a degradation in the stroboscopic effects.In addition to that, only driving the gate to 5V will result in an Rdson that is a bit higher than it could be resulting in wasted power and excess heat on the FET. You can see from his schematic that he is using 15V to power the ...

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    My guess would be to have the IRLZ44N turn on and off as fast as possible. I am further guessing that the stroboscopic effects depend on how fast you can turn on and off the LED's. According to the datasheet, this FET has a total gate charge of 48nC. I believe that driver is capable of providing up to 6A of drive current. This is significantly more than a typical Arduino output can provide. I believe driving the FET directly with an Arduino output would work as far as turning the LED's on and off. But you might notice a degradation in the stroboscopic effects.In addition to that, only driving the gate to 5V will result in an Rdson that is a bit higher than it could be resulting in wasted power and excess heat on the FET. You can see from his schematic that he is using 15V to power the driver. This means the gate of the FET will be driven to near 15V when turned on. This will mean a lower Rdson and less heat in the FET. Remember that LED is pulling 3.5A. I hope that is helpful,Joe

    You could probably drive a single, 5mm LED directly from the 555 timer. Looking at a datasheet for the 555, it looks like it can pull down better than pull up. So, you would probably want to wire the LED so that the anode is connected to VDD through a resistor and the cathode to the 555 output. You could then leave out U1, U1 and Q1 and power the whole thing off of 12V.Of course, it won't be any where near as bright as what he is showing in his video.I hope this is helpful,Joe

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  • jperch commented on kalfalfa's instructable Robotic Bead Sorting6 months ago
    Robotic Bead Sorting

    This is a really cool idea for a project. I had never heard of Phidgets before this. So I would probably use what I have already (Arduino and/or RPi with a camera).But this seems like a really cool problem for a group of kids to solve in a project. Maybe we could do it with LittleBits (I have a ton of those too).

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  • jperch commented on dushyantahuja's instructable 3D Printed Moire Illusion6 months ago
    3D Printed Moire Illusion

    Does it really take 310mm x 310mm print area? That is really big. My CR-10 is only 300x300.

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  • jperch commented on _Gyro's instructable E-Paper Picture Frame11 months ago
    E-Paper Picture Frame

    I really like this project. I think I might take a stab at building one myself. I think it would be a really cool gift. It is unfortunate that the process of putting pictures on it is a bit tedious. But that is where opportunity is.Also, it would be fun to try to take this project to the next step: make it wireless. It would almost certainly need a bigger battery for that. But that would be an interesting project. Thanks for sharing!

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  • jperch made the instructable Holocron Lamp for the Discerning Jedi1 year ago
    Holocron Lamp for the Discerning Jedi

    The video I posted doesn't seem to be working. So I am trying to post a couple of stills.

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  • jperch commented on daveyclk's instructable Holocron Lamp for the Discerning Jedi1 year ago
    Holocron Lamp for the Discerning Jedi

    daveyclk,I had posted a video of it working. But it doesn't look like it is working now. I will try to post a picture shortly.Joe

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  • jperch made the instructable Holocron Lamp for the Discerning Jedi1 year ago
    Holocron Lamp for the Discerning Jedi

    It took me a while (life happened). But I got it done!

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  • jperch commented on daveyclk's instructable Holocron Lamp for the Discerning Jedi1 year ago
    Holocron Lamp for the Discerning Jedi

    Jonathan,What I did was to cut the anodes of the LED's short, about 4 or 5mm. Then I did the same with one end of each 180 ohm resistor. I then soldered these short ends together with the resistor body sticking straight up.I then bent the other ends of the resistors over, like was done with the cathodes and soldered all of those together. I then ran one wire from all the cathodes and one wire from all the resistors to the circuit board. The resistor wire goes to +5V and the cathode wire connects to the collector of the transistor.I hope all that makes sense. I did not take any pictures of my assembly. But if you click on Daveyclk's picture, then click on the picture that comes up, you can select the large size and even zoom in to get a better idea of what he did (which is pretty much wh...

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    Jonathan,What I did was to cut the anodes of the LED's short, about 4 or 5mm. Then I did the same with one end of each 180 ohm resistor. I then soldered these short ends together with the resistor body sticking straight up.I then bent the other ends of the resistors over, like was done with the cathodes and soldered all of those together. I then ran one wire from all the cathodes and one wire from all the resistors to the circuit board. The resistor wire goes to +5V and the cathode wire connects to the collector of the transistor.I hope all that makes sense. I did not take any pictures of my assembly. But if you click on Daveyclk's picture, then click on the picture that comes up, you can select the large size and even zoom in to get a better idea of what he did (which is pretty much what I did).

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  • LM317 Based DIY Variable Benchtop Power Supply

    Another thing to consider about this circuit is that, while it does look complicated, it really is just a few simple circuits replicated and connected together to form a bigger project. For example, if you look at the circuitry surrounding U1, you can see that this circuitry is duplicated around U2. This is similarly true for the three 5V supplies, USB1, USB2 and +5V. They are all identical and operate on the output of one of the 12V circuits. So, a really nice feature of this circuit is you can learn to build a seemingly complicated and feature rich device by breaking the problem down into smaller, simpler pieces.

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  • jperch commented on daveyclk's instructable Holocron Lamp for the Discerning Jedi1 year ago
    Holocron Lamp for the Discerning Jedi

    Dave,I have all the parts printed and most of the electronics arrived today. But I have a question about your schematic. In my experience (limited as it may be), the IR detecting diode should be reverse biased, shouldn't it? Your schematic has it forward biased. I did some research and just about everywhere shows the diode reversed biased. I also looked at the instructable you reference in your code. He also has the photodiode forward biased. But he also got some comments indicating that this is not correct. I found a datasheet that seems like it is the correct one for the IR detecting diode I found on Amazon. It says the reverse dark current is about 1nA and the reverse light current is about 25uA. Notice that both currents are stated as reverse.With this diode connected as you show (...

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    Dave,I have all the parts printed and most of the electronics arrived today. But I have a question about your schematic. In my experience (limited as it may be), the IR detecting diode should be reverse biased, shouldn't it? Your schematic has it forward biased. I did some research and just about everywhere shows the diode reversed biased. I also looked at the instructable you reference in your code. He also has the photodiode forward biased. But he also got some comments indicating that this is not correct. I found a datasheet that seems like it is the correct one for the IR detecting diode I found on Amazon. It says the reverse dark current is about 1nA and the reverse light current is about 25uA. Notice that both currents are stated as reverse.With this diode connected as you show (except reversed), in dark you would see about 3.29V at the analog input on the Photon. In light (IR light), you would see about 0.8V. This would easily be detectable by the converter. Basically, I think your circuit will be correct if you just reverse the photodiode. I hope this makes sense,Joe

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  • jperch commented on daveyclk's instructable Holocron Lamp for the Discerning Jedi1 year ago
    Holocron Lamp for the Discerning Jedi

    Daveyclk,Thanks for the response. I agree the Photon is a cool platform (I already own two or three of them myself) I was just curious what the WiFi capabilities were being used for in this project. Now I know. Thank you.This does seem like a cool project. I just received from translucent blue PLA from MakerGeeks. I just might have to give this one a shot. Thanks again.

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  • jperch commented on daveyclk's instructable Holocron Lamp for the Discerning Jedi1 year ago
    Holocron Lamp for the Discerning Jedi

    FYI: The Photon is the name of a microcontroller development platform made by a company called Particle. Their web site is https://store.particle.io/collections/photon. But you can get them from Sparkfun and, of course, Amazon.

    Is there a specific reason for using a Photon? This project doesn't seem to need the WiFi capabilites. Would this also work with a normal Arduino, like a Pro-mini?

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  • jperch commented on GreatScottLab's instructable Make Your Own Tesla Coil1 year ago
    Make Your Own Tesla Coil

    Greatscottlab, I recently found your channel when you posted part 2 of this series and I subscribed. I am interested in building something like this. When I was in fourth or fifth grade, I was exposed to Tesla coils for the first time by a teacher. Now, I am an engineer and my wife is a fourth grade teacher. I am hoping to use something like this to inspire more kids into STEM. Have you tried running your bridge from power mains yet? I did not see that in your videos. I would like to try that in the version I build. But I think I would consider using some isolation between the IGBT drivers and the low voltage portion of the circuit. I work as an applications engineer in the field of isolated drivers for things just like this. Thanks for the great instructable.Joe

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