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  • kmpres commented on Thiwe's instructable 50's Philips Radio Saved From the Grave2 days ago
    50's Philips Radio Saved From the Grave

    Many people, particularly those who had or have careers in technology, enjoy restoring old tube sets from the 1920s to 1960s, often called the golden age of vacuum tubes. The technology is fascinating, the parts are easy to handle and understand, and when a working set rises out of the ashes of time it is a joy to behold! My guess is that this is particularly popular these days because it reminds people of the fun they had in tuning in radio stations and playing the vinyl records of their youth. Any radio in good physical condition can be restored, you've only to look online for details on how it is done. Young people who grew up with boomboxes and Bluetooth really don't appreciate this unless they know someone who does radio restoration for a hobby. Try restoring an antique radio ...

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    Many people, particularly those who had or have careers in technology, enjoy restoring old tube sets from the 1920s to 1960s, often called the golden age of vacuum tubes. The technology is fascinating, the parts are easy to handle and understand, and when a working set rises out of the ashes of time it is a joy to behold! My guess is that this is particularly popular these days because it reminds people of the fun they had in tuning in radio stations and playing the vinyl records of their youth. Any radio in good physical condition can be restored, you've only to look online for details on how it is done. Young people who grew up with boomboxes and Bluetooth really don't appreciate this unless they know someone who does radio restoration for a hobby. Try restoring an antique radio rather than converting it into something modern and mass produced. I guarantee you, the experience will be much more satisfying!

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  • How to Rebuild a BionX E-Bike Lithium-Ion Battery Pack

    Hello Pete,Unfortunately, I'm rather restricted myself these days. I live in Tokyo, Japan and actually rebuilt my Bionx pack in Seoul, South Korea when I lived there about three years ago. As I recall, buying quality lithium-ion cells was quite difficult and expensive from overseas. Getting them shipped from America was impossible due to shipping regulations, I couldn't get Japanese vendors to send them to me in bulk (even though Panasonic theoretically makes them in Japan) and those from China are always suspicious so I ended up buying them at high cost from Sweden. It might be easier for you to buy them in Canada but for me it was quite difficult. Also, my Bionx motor developed a flaw while I was in Seoul (the torque assist circuit would engage randomly making the bike quite dang...

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    Hello Pete,Unfortunately, I'm rather restricted myself these days. I live in Tokyo, Japan and actually rebuilt my Bionx pack in Seoul, South Korea when I lived there about three years ago. As I recall, buying quality lithium-ion cells was quite difficult and expensive from overseas. Getting them shipped from America was impossible due to shipping regulations, I couldn't get Japanese vendors to send them to me in bulk (even though Panasonic theoretically makes them in Japan) and those from China are always suspicious so I ended up buying them at high cost from Sweden. It might be easier for you to buy them in Canada but for me it was quite difficult. Also, my Bionx motor developed a flaw while I was in Seoul (the torque assist circuit would engage randomly making the bike quite dangerous to ride) so I had Bionx send me a replacement, but that didn't last long either. They kindly sent me another one but that one was speed restricted and locked. By then I was moving back to Tokyo and had no time to follow up with them. I've since learned that they have gone into receivership and don't know if they've managed to stay in business. My battery pack still works and I keep it cycled with my balance charger so my plan now is to disassemble the original motor and repair its defective torque-assist circuit. Hopefully I'll get to that after I move into a new house later this year. As for your battery, it sounds like you're suffering from the same charge problem I had. The Bionx charger cannot balance charge the pack so inevitably some cells will weaken to the point where the monitoring circuitry will refuse to allow the whole pack to charge. That's a pity because the packs cannot be easily disassembled due to the spot-welding done at the factory. A balance charger could possibly bounce the pack back to life, or at least tell you which cell cluster is bad, but you'll still have to disassemble the pack to attach the balance wires and remove any bad cells. I don't recommend this due to the danger of creating shorts. Your best bet, really, is to rebuild the pack following my instructable, but you'll need to get really good with a soldering iron first, or build a DIY spot-welder, several of which are on Instructables and elsewhere on the net. I'd do it for you if I had the time, but it is a labor-intensive project and my location would probably prevent me from sending you the finished product anyway. Canada has a large DIY community so I'm sure you can find someone local to you who can do this work for you.Good luck!Brucekmpres

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  • kmpres commented on mosivers's instructable Word Clock Controlled by 114 Servos7 weeks ago
    Word Clock Controlled by 114 Servos

    A most impressive build! I applaud your ability to stay focused on the more monotonous aspects and follow the project through to completion -- the end result was worth the time spent! One caution, though. I have a box full of seldom used cheap servos that have failed in one way or another, most becoming slow, inaccurate or sloppy. The weakest part seems to be the potentiometer. With 114 inexpensive servos in one device, the chances of them failing one by one as time goes on are pretty good. I hope you bought spares!

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  • Colorizing Old B&W Photos and Videos With the Help of AI

    Fantastic! I have aviation history in my family and have an archive of aviation photos from WW1 and the 1920s. I wrote a 500 page book on the subject (but because I don't know if it is fair to advertise in these comments so I will only respond privately to requests for information). But pursuant to those photos was a question asked by the curator of the Deutches Museum in Munich on the exact color scheme of the only Dornier Libelle II left in the world which they possess. The plane once belonged to my grandfather and we have numerous photos of him on or in it, but no one, including the museum, knows what the original color scheme was. Dornier did a beautiful job of restoring the plane but painted it grey because that was the color in the photos they used for reference. Can this AI...

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    Fantastic! I have aviation history in my family and have an archive of aviation photos from WW1 and the 1920s. I wrote a 500 page book on the subject (but because I don't know if it is fair to advertise in these comments so I will only respond privately to requests for information). But pursuant to those photos was a question asked by the curator of the Deutches Museum in Munich on the exact color scheme of the only Dornier Libelle II left in the world which they possess. The plane once belonged to my grandfather and we have numerous photos of him on or in it, but no one, including the museum, knows what the original color scheme was. Dornier did a beautiful job of restoring the plane but painted it grey because that was the color in the photos they used for reference. Can this AI program bring back the original colors of this long lost airplane for us?

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  • An Ultra Low Wattage, High Gain Tube Amplifier

    Wow, that is one tight little package! Looks and sounds great! It's hard to believe you got six tubes and a transformer in a space not much bigger than a pedal. Did you breadboard the circuit before designing the layout or did you design it stage by stage from known good past designs?

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  • kmpres commented on JonMackey's instructable Dust Collector Full Detector3 months ago
    Dust Collector Full Detector

    Very interesting project, and well written, too! Your skills with SMT construction techniques and MCU programming are obviously top notch, things I've been trying to catch up on in my retirement but with limited success. I guess I'm a bit old-school and prefer to keep my circuits as simple as possible. So you think suspending an LED and photo-diode from the venturi plate into the dustbin won't work reliably? I salute your inventiveness in solving that problem, but it seems to me that most dust collectors don't work continuously. The LED/photo-diode circuit could be turned on just before blower motor power-up and trip a relay to the blower motor if dust is detected. The problem of churning dust causing the circuit to activate prematurely is therefore minimized and the need for mecha...

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    Very interesting project, and well written, too! Your skills with SMT construction techniques and MCU programming are obviously top notch, things I've been trying to catch up on in my retirement but with limited success. I guess I'm a bit old-school and prefer to keep my circuits as simple as possible. So you think suspending an LED and photo-diode from the venturi plate into the dustbin won't work reliably? I salute your inventiveness in solving that problem, but it seems to me that most dust collectors don't work continuously. The LED/photo-diode circuit could be turned on just before blower motor power-up and trip a relay to the blower motor if dust is detected. The problem of churning dust causing the circuit to activate prematurely is therefore minimized and the need for mechanical parts, motors, gears, etc is eliminated. Could your circuit be adapted for that?

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  • Sharpening Rotary Razor Blades - Safe and Simple Method

    You know well how to replace battery packs for devices whose packs were never meant to be replaced. I hate filling up land-fills with perfectly usable appliances so I do this kind of thing all the time. The basic secret is to remove all oxidation first, apply lots of liquid flux, use a good quality clean iron and get on and off the cells as quickly as possible. My other instructable on How to Rebuild a BionX E-Bike Battery Pack describes this method in detail for 18650 Li-Ion cells. You are correct in saying that NiMH and nicad cells are, to a degree, interchangeable, but do pay attention to the charge and discharge currents as the cells have different internal resistances. For example, the same trickle chargers will work on AA sized cells (50 ma charge current) but larger NiMH cel...

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    You know well how to replace battery packs for devices whose packs were never meant to be replaced. I hate filling up land-fills with perfectly usable appliances so I do this kind of thing all the time. The basic secret is to remove all oxidation first, apply lots of liquid flux, use a good quality clean iron and get on and off the cells as quickly as possible. My other instructable on How to Rebuild a BionX E-Bike Battery Pack describes this method in detail for 18650 Li-Ion cells. You are correct in saying that NiMH and nicad cells are, to a degree, interchangeable, but do pay attention to the charge and discharge currents as the cells have different internal resistances. For example, the same trickle chargers will work on AA sized cells (50 ma charge current) but larger NiMH cells should be charged with a peak detection circuit to keep from overcharging them. Fortunately, there aren't too many nicad cells left in the world so this is kind of a moot point these days. Li-Ion cells, however, use an entirely different technology and must be charged with chargers designed specifically for them or literally a fire could result. For a while markets were flooded with poorly designed chargers from China and lots of fires resulted, but changes to import laws seem to have reduced those occurrences to a minimum recently.I just bought a new shaver to replace my old Remington, a Chinese brand I never heard of before called a "Phisco", so I'll be looking out for the metal slivers you mentioned. I suspect, though, that frequent cleaning of the blades will simply brush them away with the whiskers. After they seat themselves into their screens and "self-hone" the blades should remain sharp and free of metal debris for the life of the shaver as long as I remember to not mix them up. Time will tell. If you ever do make some titanium screens then do let me know. Speaking of replacing irreplaceable parts, titanium literally feels like skin to the touch which is why it is used to replace body parts. It will take some serious CNC machining, though, so you're a better man than me for making the attempt. I look forward to seeing the results!

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  • Sharpening Rotary Razor Blades - Safe and Simple Method

    There seems to be some confusion on how best to maintain the blades and screens in rotary shavers. The following has worked well for me for the five rotary shavers I have owned, all lasting more than eight years each. Perhaps it could work well for you, too. 1. Only use the shaver dry, never in the shower, and never use water to wash out the whiskers. The reason is that the whiskers tend to cake up in the nooks and crannies making a kind of cement that is hard to remove later, and that can damage the moving parts. You also don't want to drop the thing in the shower as that will break it.2. Remove the shaver from the charger after each full charge and leave it off until the razor reaches its minimum charge level. Only then should you give it a new charge. This deep cycles the batt...

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    There seems to be some confusion on how best to maintain the blades and screens in rotary shavers. The following has worked well for me for the five rotary shavers I have owned, all lasting more than eight years each. Perhaps it could work well for you, too. 1. Only use the shaver dry, never in the shower, and never use water to wash out the whiskers. The reason is that the whiskers tend to cake up in the nooks and crannies making a kind of cement that is hard to remove later, and that can damage the moving parts. You also don't want to drop the thing in the shower as that will break it.2. Remove the shaver from the charger after each full charge and leave it off until the razor reaches its minimum charge level. Only then should you give it a new charge. This deep cycles the batteries and gives you the most life out of them which is generally about 200-300 charges depending on chemistry. Obviously, the more time that elapses between charges the longer the batteries, and your razor will last.3. After each shave open and lightly tap the head assembly over the sink to knock out the loose whiskers. Lightly brush the parts but it is not necessary to remove them until the time comes to recharge the batteries.4. THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT STEP: When disassembling the shaver head, always keep track of which blade came out of which screen and return them in that order. Don't mix them up! The reason is because the blades and screens wear into each other and develop a track that will not fit the other blades/screens if you mix them up. The result will be a poorly working shaver until the blades have had time to wear into the screens again and more of the metal will have worn away in this process. If you keep doing this you'll be replacing heads and screens more often than necessary. Using this method I have never had to replace a blade or screen ever in the 45+ years I've been using rotary shavers. 5. Thoroughly clean the blades when the battery charge goes down to its minimum level. The batteries have nothing to do with the cleaning of the blades except that the time interval seems to work best for both if these steps are done simultaneously. Gently hold the blades in your fingers and brush them with the brush that came with the kit or use a clean epoxy brush. They're cheap and the bristles can be cut short to make them stiffer if necessary. Brush the screens and holder assembly as well. You can use hot water to rinse out the head after you've finished brushing the parts but avoid getting water in the head cavity. Before inserting the blades, put a small drop of mineral oil (baby oil if you prefer) in each screen to lubricate the blades. After closing the head assembly, run the shaver for a few seconds to mate the blades to the motor shafts and spread the oil around, then wipe off the excess oil on the outside of the screens with a tissue. Using the above five steps your shaver should not require any parts to keep it running throughout its entire life. I have also had three "vibrators" and one "lawn mower" type and none have lasted as long as my rotaries. The batteries will lose about half of their charge capacity after 8 years at which point I'll either replace them or buy a new razor. Replacing the batteries can be difficult and requires some special tools so I don't recommend this procedure. However, if you cycle the batteries properly and keep the blades and screens cleaned and oiled as described above your shaver should give you many years of trouble-free service.

    Yes, I didn't mention nicads because they haven't been used in many years. The six year old Remington shaver I took apart a few weeks ago had corroded 1600 mahr NiMH cells that had dropped to about half their normal capacity so I replaced them with newer but less capacity 1000 mahr NiMH cells. Same shaves per charge resulted so I consider it a good repair for an old shaver.While I don't doubt that unhoned metal slivers do exist, I have never seen them in my shavers possibly because I never mix up the blades and screens. What causes skin irritation for me is the chrome plating used in making the screens. Chrome is a known skin irritant but it is cheap to manufacture. Titanium is most compatible with skin but it is seldom seen in shavers because it is expensive to manufacture. The o...

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    Yes, I didn't mention nicads because they haven't been used in many years. The six year old Remington shaver I took apart a few weeks ago had corroded 1600 mahr NiMH cells that had dropped to about half their normal capacity so I replaced them with newer but less capacity 1000 mahr NiMH cells. Same shaves per charge resulted so I consider it a good repair for an old shaver.While I don't doubt that unhoned metal slivers do exist, I have never seen them in my shavers possibly because I never mix up the blades and screens. What causes skin irritation for me is the chrome plating used in making the screens. Chrome is a known skin irritant but it is cheap to manufacture. Titanium is most compatible with skin but it is seldom seen in shavers because it is expensive to manufacture. The only vibrator shaver I liked out of the three that I've owned had a titanium foil but the company went out of business some 20 years ago. I now slap on a pre-shave lotion prior to each shave and follow the shave with a quick wipe with a wet washcloth and that has pretty well eliminated the skin irritation I used to get from chrome shaver heads.I'm glad you liked my desulfator circuit. It turned out to be a surprisingly popular instructable, especially in third world countries I was gratified to learn. Your Solar Charged Electric Club Car sounds very interesting. You should write an instructable for it, too, if you haven't already.

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  • kmpres commented on diycreators's instructable How to Make a SOFA That Turns Into a BED4 months ago
    How to Make a SOFA That Turns Into a BED

    Awesome build! I really like the knotty pine(?) as the knots are attractive and give the wood character it wouldn't otherwise have. I wonder if a set of wheels under the movable section wouldn't make it easier to pull out, especially over a rug. Also, I recently built a fairly complex table using a biscuit joiner to make the top and two drop leaves and found it a lot easier and more accurate than using dowels. My dowels never seem to line up properly no matter how hard I try but the biscuits are self-centering and make seamless joints.

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  • kmpres commented on Cam647's instructable Broken Solar Panel Glass Repair (Simple)5 months ago
    Broken Solar Panel Glass Repair (Simple)

    So this is some kind of two-part polyurethane is it? The stuff available in the country where I live is simply called urethane, is one-part, has no odor and looks like skim milk though it is a tad thicker. It works well, though. I just finished a new lab table with four coats of the stuff. Each coat dried in ten minutes and left a beautiful shine with minimal sanding between coats. I love it - will throw out all my old cans of varnish and will use this from now on. Is that the same stuff as yours or is yours something more like epoxy?

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  • GPS & Real Time Clock Stratum 1 Time Server

    I enjoyed your logical analysis of the problem and the thought processes you used to solve it. I have avoided IoT devices until now due to the unreliable nature of internet connections. I shall have to revisit that assessment now that your instructable has given us a means of keeping our local networks alive when the web is down. Very well done instructable! Oh, and for the record, not all Americans think third world countries are "#$%&-hole Countries". Many of us are trying to preserve American ideals despite the ravings of some poorly chosen souls in Washington.

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  • kmpres commented on AroundHome's instructable Workbench Leg Vise5 months ago
    Workbench Leg Vise

    Nice build! I wish my shop was as new and fully equipped as yours. I was half expecting the lower leg of your vise to have a second acme threaded rod driven by a sprocket and bicycle chain connecting it to the upper rod that would more closely match the mechanical movements of the vise jaws. You'd have to make the chain fairly tight to avoid backlash but the robustness of your design suggests it could be done fairly easily. The chain would have to be covered to keep the sawdust out, though. Do you think that's possible?

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  • kmpres commented on rgco's instructable Arduino Waveform Generator7 months ago
    Arduino Waveform Generator

    Very interesting and well written instructable, and I appreciate the well laid out and easy to follow code to run the device. I'm looking for just such a device but hope to get it to give at least 500 KHz of undistorted sine wave so I can use it to generate IF frequencies for radio repair work. I wonder if there'd be any benefit to using two Arduinos instead of one, one for frequency generation and the other for interrupt handling? Could the output frequency be increased using such a scheme?

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  • Desulfator for 12V Car Batteries, in an Altoids Tin

    The LED should light when it is forward biased, but it uses the forward voltage drop of the silicon diode as its source. If you're using a Schottky diode, or one that has a lower voltage drop than your LED requires, there might not be enough voltage to power the LED. I also used an old yellow LED from my junk bin and since it worked right off I left it as is and never checked the Vfd. You may have to experiment with different LEDs and check the drop using a scope to get one that works.

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  • kmpres commented on Faransky's instructable Portable Function Generator on Arduino8 months ago
    Portable Function Generator on Arduino

    Very nice project! Been looking for something like this. Is the 10 MHz limit caused solely by the AD9833 module? Is there a way to get up to 30 MHz of clean sine wave from the device or perhaps another? I need to cover all frequencies between audio and 30 MHz for a Ham Radio project. Thanks.

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  • kmpres commented on kmpres's instructable How to Rebuild a BionX E-Bike Battery Pack8 months ago
    How to Rebuild a BionX E-Bike Battery Pack

    It's actually holding up quite well. I monitor the battery and cycle them from time to time. My charging setup is great. The 10-cell balance charger is much better than the original non-balanced charger. Also, a good set of cells helps a lot. I don't think salvaged cells from, for example, old laptop batteries, would have worked as well.

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  • kmpres commented on Kink Jarfold's instructable THE DRILL PRESS SPINDLE SANDER9 months ago
    THE DRILL PRESS SPINDLE SANDER

    Nicely done! I did this many years ago using a much shorter spindle on my Shopsmith. As I recall, there was some noticeable side-flex in the spindle near the chuck, but because the spindle was only a few inches long it didn't seriously affect my projects. You could, however, reduce this flex, particularly with long spindles, by mounting a bearing at the far end of the spindle and anchoring the outer race in the hole in the middle of the drill table. This, of course, requires that the chuck's center be exactly lined up with the center of the hole to be certain the spindle runs true.

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  • 6 Mistakes Not to Make Building a Farmhouse Table

    Very well done video. You're obviously a student of media or have an armload of video software and are not afraid to use it. That puts old folks like me at a disadvantage but that's OK. I'm happy to see it and am looking forward to seeing more from you. About the video, your opening photo showed a leg pedestal so I though your first "mistake" would be about the built-in stress points inherent in that particular design. The timbers are quite robust so it is probably not an issue for everyday use, however the side stresses pressing down on the table's front and rear edges would be concentrated angularly at the center mortise and tenon location on the vertical posts. This could lead to cracks developing at those locations in time, depending on the loads placed on the table....

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    Very well done video. You're obviously a student of media or have an armload of video software and are not afraid to use it. That puts old folks like me at a disadvantage but that's OK. I'm happy to see it and am looking forward to seeing more from you. About the video, your opening photo showed a leg pedestal so I though your first "mistake" would be about the built-in stress points inherent in that particular design. The timbers are quite robust so it is probably not an issue for everyday use, however the side stresses pressing down on the table's front and rear edges would be concentrated angularly at the center mortise and tenon location on the vertical posts. This could lead to cracks developing at those locations in time, depending on the loads placed on the table. I suggest a back-to-back "capital letter K" design for future tables that would distribute the loads more evenly across the timbers and avoid stress cracks.

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  • kmpres followed Tesalex1 year ago
      • Convert Your IR Remote to RF Remote
      • Word of the Day Display With IoT
      • DIY Word Clock
  • kmpres commented on seamster's instructable How to Make a Polished Aluminum Foil Ball1 year ago
    How to Make a Polished Aluminum Foil Ball

    Fascinatingly impractical, but you can't argue with success. The Japanese Sky-Tomo link supplied in the 'ible' has over 3.8 million views! A few of those and I could retire early!

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  • kmpres commented on makjosher's instructable Secret Book Light Switch1 year ago
    Secret Book Light Switch

    Nice one! An alternative to screws might be to use short pop rivets. This would eliminate the need to cut the screws short with a cutoff wheel which can be dangerous for young players. Also, good idea on using solder and heat shrink tubing on the switch. Don't be tempted to use tape as it will unravel in time.

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  • Bergen Makerspace Transportable 3D Printer

    Very impressive! Love the portability aspect. Been waiting for a 3D printer that has reliable hi-res output in hard materials and doesn't take up a lot of space. I've been looking for a nut-driver set like the one you displayed in Step 1. Can you tell me where you got it? Also, I've been using for years an old Monokote heat gun for shrinking heat-shrink tubing. Model airplaners know what these are - they're available at any hobby store or online for around $20. Hotter than a hair blower but not nearly as hot as as a desoldering station so it is much safer to use on electronic wiring. Forget using soldering irons or butane lighters on heat-shrink tubing. They're much too dangerous and sloppy in my opinion.

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  • Hacking TV Tuner to Read Earth Photos From Satellites

    Excellent! Great that you can decode satellite and even ISS transmissions. I've wanted to get my feet wet in SDR for some time and this looks like the time. I will have to be careful with my choice of SDR device as apparently the one in this instructable does not support the US, Canada and Japan, the three countries I travel to most often. But thanks for the idea, I'm sure that many others will work fine in my locations.

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  • kmpres followed woodenProjects1 year ago
      • Hacking TV Tuner to Read Earth Photos From Satellites
      • Magic and Unusual Things in Stop Motion Animation
      • Wreck Race - Do It Yourself!
  • kmpres commented on Thingking's instructable Water Saving Toilet-Mounted Basin1 year ago
    Water Saving Toilet-Mounted Basin

    Great idea, and neatly done, but the idea isn't new. In Japan, the majority of all toilets, both western and Japanese styles, have a curved spout coming out the top of the tank where the water simply pours into a shallow basin before draining into the tank. The intention is to provide a place to rinse one's hands without having to use a separate sink with its own water line thereby saving space in tiny Japanese water closets. By the way, I wouldn't rinse your mouth with this water. Though the water is perfectly safe, impurities from your mouth will eventually cause water spots outside and collect around the valve parts inside the tank requiring you to wipe down those parts down from time to time.

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  • kmpres followed netzener1 year ago
      • 8 Transistor Stereo Amplifier
      • Portable Variable Power Supply
      • One Tube AM Radio
  • kmpres commented on mscharch's instructable Laminated 2X4 Work Tables1 year ago
    Laminated 2X4 Work Tables

    Great design, thanks. While I understand the criticisms regarding the K braces, the robustness of the overall structure more than makes up for them. If it were tested I suspect the table would take a half ton or more of weight on the front edge before the rear legs would crack or the glued tenons would give way - more than enough for normal purposes. The tenons can be screwed, pinned or wedged for more strength but I don't think even that is necessary. And yes, it is a work table, because that is what you do on it, regardless of your line of work.

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  • Desulfator for 12V Car Batteries, in an Altoids Tin

    I'm afraid I don't have a clue. You'd have to test it with a fast scope to be certain it is working properly.

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  • Cost Effective Plastic-tub Wicking Beds

    Very nicely written and congrats on your first instructable! I never heard of wicking beds until now but that's not surprising considering my black-thumbed total ignorance of gardening generally. I do, however, have some experience with plastic. Just be aware that your plastic tubs may not last more than a year or two before they'll shatter into tiny pieces. The sun's UV radiation tends to break down the chemical structure of inexpensive plastic items turning them eventually into brittle flakes.

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  • kmpres commented on rog8811's instructable Dog Anti Bark Screen...... 1 year ago
    Dog Anti Bark Screen......

    They're funny that way, aren't they. Toy poodles have no concept of their own size. Mine can't look at themselves in a mirror but they sure know what other dogs look like and are ready to defend their territory no matter how big, loud or nasty the invading dog is. If I ever took them to a farm or a zoo I'd probably have a lot of explaining to do.

    My other dog, also a poodle (miniature), liked to bark at other dogs and horses on our TV and nearly jumped through it on a few occasions (horses are just big dogs according to him). The only thing that stopped him was old age. The female, however, is only three...

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  • HOW TO MAKE COFFEE MACHINE FROM GLUE GUN HEATER

    I salute your ingenuity, but you should know that rubber garden hoses, glue gun heaters and most plastics are not rated food-safe, particularly when heated. Used soldering irons also have lead on their tips. Can you change your design to use food-safe parts instead?

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  • kmpres commented on scoochmaroo's instructable 15 Unusual Uses for Cheap Vodka1 year ago
    15 Unusual Uses for Cheap Vodka

    Just use isopropyl alcohol instead of vodka for eyeglass cleaner. It's cheaper and you can keep it with your bathroom chemicals without making the spouse and kids suspicious. Use the 70% kind you get from the supermarket or pharmacy. Fill your spray bottle half full, then top it off with tap water. That leaves you with about a 35% solution which you can use every day on your glasses for years without damaging them. By the way, the soap and fragrance in commercial eyeglass cleaners are just "feel good" ingredients for the consumer. They do nothing to clean your lenses - it's the alcohol that does all the work.

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  • kmpres commented on MissionSRX's instructable Write a Science Fiction Novel1 year ago
    Write a Science Fiction Novel

    Amazon, Barnes and Noble and BookDepository in Australia have it. I hope you like it! They also have the Mission SRX books, which are excellent.

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  • kmpres commented on MissionSRX's instructable Write a Science Fiction Novel1 year ago
    Write a Science Fiction Novel

    Yes it is, I'm so glad you asked! It is called A World War 1 Adventure, The Life and Times of RNAS Bomber Pilot Donald E. Harkness. It is available from several sources online with a simple search.

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  • kmpres commented on geotek's instructable Harvesting Electronic Components1 year ago
    Harvesting Electronic Components

    I agree with some commentors about using flame vs hot air to remove parts. Burning plastic can give off toxic fumes so it's best to use a desoldering station or hot air gun designed for desoldering instead of a torch to remove parts. Torching can also raise the temperature of parts past their design limits which can cause them to change value beyond their built-in tolerance levels. You won't know this until you try to reuse those parts and find that your circuits don't respond the way you think they should. Be careful with the heat and only heat the underside of the board so as to let the board itself protect the parts from excess heat while you remove them.Also, regarding cheap parts purchased online, some overseas vendors have been known to sell cheap knock-off clones of popular chip...

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    I agree with some commentors about using flame vs hot air to remove parts. Burning plastic can give off toxic fumes so it's best to use a desoldering station or hot air gun designed for desoldering instead of a torch to remove parts. Torching can also raise the temperature of parts past their design limits which can cause them to change value beyond their built-in tolerance levels. You won't know this until you try to reuse those parts and find that your circuits don't respond the way you think they should. Be careful with the heat and only heat the underside of the board so as to let the board itself protect the parts from excess heat while you remove them.Also, regarding cheap parts purchased online, some overseas vendors have been known to sell cheap knock-off clones of popular chips and semiconductors as well as "precision" passive parts that are well outside their advertised tolerance levels. The chips often produce unspecified results or don't work as well as the originals and the passives (resistors, caps, etc.) make building precision circuits difficult. Troubleshooting them can be very frustrating.

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  • kmpres commented on kmpres's instructable How to Rebuild a BionX E-Bike Battery Pack1 year ago
    How to Rebuild a BionX E-Bike Battery Pack

    Judging from the four switches on one side, that appears to be a G1 console. G2s have two switches on either side of the display. Judging from the large chips yours also appears to contain most or all of your bike's processing circuitry where mine is centralized in the battery. If yours is a CanBus system (serial number begins with 2332) then the signals going to the motor should be similar. Usually it's hard to mix up the connectors as they attach the harness together in only one way, but you may have to trace out the wires with a continuity tester to be certain.

    Greetings from Japan! Well, not to be too confusing on the matter, but my throttle has two wires and one goes to the handlebar console and the other goes to the wiring harness which ends at the slide-in connector on the battery. My system was built in 2012, about the time when BionX changed to the G2 console. Yours may be older or have a slightly different wiring harness. I'm not sure about the differences between European vs North American models, but I believe the primary ones are in system firmware and have to do with top-speed and torque-assist in order to accommodate the different country's government regulations. What the exact wiring differences are, if any, I do not know.

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  • (Adjustable) Power Supply 650 Watts 54 Amps for Under $50

    Very nicely done! Unless I missed it somewhere, I might suggest you cut ventilation holes in the right side of your case so you get some cross ventilation. Your fan will work better and your server power supply will love the fresh air.

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  • Desulfator for 12V Car Batteries, in an Altoids Tin

    I've not tried other values for C4 so I don't know whether a 450uf 16V cap will work or not. However, for safety's sake, I would say that 16V is too low as the circuit may experience 20V DC or more if the battery were to become disconnected and the trickle charger left in. Most trickle chargers do not have regulated outputs. 450uf is also more than four times the original cap's capacitance rating. It's not there to filter out ripple so you can't just increase the value without affecting the circuit's frequency characteristics. Also, a low Equivalent Series Resistance rating is necessary to limit the heat dissipated by the cap when the circuit is in operation.

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  • Password Manager, Typer, Macro, Payload ... All in ONE!

    This device is just as secure as your pocket - the same pocket that holds your car keys or your house keys - so it is plenty secure as long as you don't lose it AND your computer at the same time. Just be careful what you put on it so that if someone finds it, all he has is your passwords and not your name or log in IDs. That said, you should still be able to put in a hidden switch, or some kind of pre-code in the software that only you know, and that you must enter before it will release any of your passwords. Not quite as safe as encryption, but better than nothing, and you can still keep the thing locked safely away in your pocket.

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  • kmpres commented on MissionSRX's instructable Write a Science Fiction Novel2 years ago
    Write a Science Fiction Novel

    I wish I'd seen this three years ago when I published my first (and so far only) book. It wasn't science fiction, though that's always been a fascination of mine. It was actually an historical memoir based on my grandfather's first-hand accounts of his adventures through World War One. In 1915 he traveled to England from New Zealand and learned to fly airplanes on his own expense; became a successful bomber pilot; destroyed a zeppelin shed; got shot down over Holland; lived through a year of internment and had many other adventures -- a lot like science fiction in many ways, come to think of it. Fortunately for me he wrote voluminous diaries and letters, wrote well (for a 22 year-old) and had neat handwriting so I had little difficulty reading his accounts. I only had to provide a t...

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    I wish I'd seen this three years ago when I published my first (and so far only) book. It wasn't science fiction, though that's always been a fascination of mine. It was actually an historical memoir based on my grandfather's first-hand accounts of his adventures through World War One. In 1915 he traveled to England from New Zealand and learned to fly airplanes on his own expense; became a successful bomber pilot; destroyed a zeppelin shed; got shot down over Holland; lived through a year of internment and had many other adventures -- a lot like science fiction in many ways, come to think of it. Fortunately for me he wrote voluminous diaries and letters, wrote well (for a 22 year-old) and had neat handwriting so I had little difficulty reading his accounts. I only had to provide a timeline and weave an adventure out of it all. Oh, and do it in two versions of English; his early 20th century Kiwi English and my not-so-cultured late 20th century New York English, a rather interesting brew at times. Writing it was fun, publishing it was not. Lots of mistakes made and far too much money spent. New authors could very much use a good publishing guide, have you ever thought of writing one?

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  • kmpres completed the lesson Welcome! in the class Raspberry Pi Class2 years ago
  • kmpres commented on GreatScottLab's instructable Make Your Own Li-Ion Battery Pack2 years ago
    Make Your Own Li-Ion Battery Pack

    I always enjoy your Great Scott videos. Very informative, well thought out and neatly executed. I concur about the difficulty of making a spot-welder and using solder instead. As long as careful steps are taken to avoid overheating the cells, soldering works as well or better than spot-welding. I wonder, however, why you included a BMS when you're already using a balance charger? I made a similar instructable recently for an e-bike battery pack that included a balance charger but no BMS because there was no room for one: https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Rebuild-a-BionX-E-Bike-Battery-Pack/

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  • kmpres commented on tinkrmind's instructable Easy as pie GPS datalogger2 years ago
    Easy as pie GPS datalogger

    Nice idea! Can you read the data while on the run, say, in an Android phone?

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  • kmpres commented on kmpres's instructable How to Rebuild a BionX e-Bike Battery Pack2 years ago
    How to Rebuild a BionX e-Bike Battery Pack

    Thanks for your comments!

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  • kmpres commented on kmpres's instructable How to Rebuild a BionX e-Bike Battery Pack2 years ago
    How to Rebuild a BionX e-Bike Battery Pack

    Thank you for your comments! I was beginning to think that no one was reading this instructable. Lithium-ion cells are perfectly safe as long as they are charged and used properly. They become dangerous when left on poorly designed chargers for long periods or are mishandled in use, hence the emphasis on safety.

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  • kmpres's instructable How to Rebuild a BionX e-Bike Battery Pack's weekly stats: 2 years ago
    • How to Rebuild a BionX e-Bike Battery Pack
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  • kmpres commented on Von Malegowski's instructable How to Pick a Lock (Basics)2 years ago
    How to Pick a Lock (Basics)

    In order to carry on this activity, legally or otherwise, you hear one expression used over and over: "Check your local laws." A one-word question: How? (It's not as easy as it sounds). Try it.Another question for those who like moral debates: If you leave your house unlocked (or inadequately locked as this instructable suggests) and your house is robbed, who is responsible? Pretend you're an insurance agent and answer the question. The amount you get from your insurance company determines your level of responsibility. In most cases, the criminal is not even in the discussion.

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  • Desulfator for 12V Car Batteries, in an Altoids Tin

    Deep down in the comments other people have said the same about the venerable old IRFZ44N.  One or two commenters listed alternatives though I don't know how good they are.  I chose the IRFZ44N because it is fully "on" at logic levels but will take a gate to source voltage (Vgs) of up to 20V, a maximum drain to source voltage (Vds) of 55V, and a maximum power dissipation of 110 Watts.  Any N-channel MOSFET in those ranges should work as well.    As for setting R2, just start in the mid-range and follow Step 4.  Bear in mind that this is a voltage device, not a current device.  If your current meter shows anything over an amp you will overheat things.  A fast scope will help you a lot but it is not required.  A 15k 10-turn trim pot f...

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    Deep down in the comments other people have said the same about the venerable old IRFZ44N.  One or two commenters listed alternatives though I don't know how good they are.  I chose the IRFZ44N because it is fully "on" at logic levels but will take a gate to source voltage (Vgs) of up to 20V, a maximum drain to source voltage (Vds) of 55V, and a maximum power dissipation of 110 Watts.  Any N-channel MOSFET in those ranges should work as well.    As for setting R2, just start in the mid-range and follow Step 4.  Bear in mind that this is a voltage device, not a current device.  If your current meter shows anything over an amp you will overheat things.  A fast scope will help you a lot but it is not required.  A 15k 10-turn trim pot for R2 might make the adjustment less sensitive. Yes, the tone is important.  You may or may not hear it if you use inductors that are wildly different from mine.  You'll definitely not hear it if your 555 is not working properly. You should see a nice series of short-duration 12V pulses going into the gate of your FET (see Step 4). If the signal is clean then the FET will not get warm.  If it is noisy then the FET may not turn off completely causing it to overheat. The inductors, C4 and D2, however, will get quite warm to the touch. The trick is to adjust the pots so they do not become too hot to touch after extended use.  In my case that corresponded with a total current consumption of about .7 amps and a 50V spike going into the battery.    

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