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  • Non-VESA Monitors and Computer Hardware Wall Mounts

    A lot of work for what should be a straightforward exercise.The first 22" monitor I bought was a Samsung and it was very disappointing to find that for one of the biggest manufacturers of TVs and monitors, it had no VESA mounts (won't buy again) - LG do them as standard.I did toy with the idea of just making up a plate in metal or plastic and simply tap the four M4 holes for a mount. There are some pretty good double-sided tapes around like 3M (Scotch) VM Command. Alternatively, it should be possible to find a decent adhesive from the Loctite range for plastics.In the end, I opted for a simple bookstand arrangement in wood with a couple of wing nuts to adjust the viewing angle. If you were feeling brave, you could open the monitor up and see if there was space on the other side of ...

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    A lot of work for what should be a straightforward exercise.The first 22" monitor I bought was a Samsung and it was very disappointing to find that for one of the biggest manufacturers of TVs and monitors, it had no VESA mounts (won't buy again) - LG do them as standard.I did toy with the idea of just making up a plate in metal or plastic and simply tap the four M4 holes for a mount. There are some pretty good double-sided tapes around like 3M (Scotch) VM Command. Alternatively, it should be possible to find a decent adhesive from the Loctite range for plastics.In the end, I opted for a simple bookstand arrangement in wood with a couple of wing nuts to adjust the viewing angle. If you were feeling brave, you could open the monitor up and see if there was space on the other side of the case to fit a captive nut (clinch nut)For what it's worth, the Samsung TV I bought had a VESA mount, but they don't bother tapping the holes. Instead, they supply thread cutting screws (trilobar thread). No amount of pressure was going to get them into steel, so I simply tapped the holes. Another reason not to buy Samsung. What other people do I don't know. Most would not recognise a thread cutting screw, let alone have a decent screwdriver to avoid destroying the head.However, a thorough exercise in engineering to achieve the end result.

    Yes. Entirely agree about the statement. Bodgers use nails, engineers use screws.When I build, I'm the one who might have to fix it one day, so no nails.

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  • DIY Mini UPS for WiFi Router / Modem

    I've got UPSs dotted all around the place to keep the critical stuff going after one of our frequent power outages. In fact I've just added one to my router and phone equipment, albeit a 1100-W commercial unit knocking out 240-VAV. Another guy has one on his heating system.Commercial units aren't all they are cracked up to be. One APC unit simply blew up and defeated the object and a second Salicru unit didn't work out of the box. I did fix the Salicru, but both manufacturers use pretty cheap components working close to tolerances. Most of the time you don't need all the fancy communication stuff, and better to spend money on better components and do your own thing. Interestingly, all the commercial units use lead acid cells, maybe for safety.

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  • pgs070947 commented on diymontreal's instructable Trapezoid Leg Bench11 days ago
    Trapezoid Leg Bench

    Stability? Especially on the thick rug. Probably OK on the floorboards, though

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  • pgs070947 commented on Ham-made's instructable Paper Stud Finder18 days ago
    Paper Stud Finder

    I live in the UK where most drywallers loved their nails - cost less than screws.So apart from the damaged board, popped heads and doubts about any weight-carrying, I routinely hoick out the nails with a cat's paw nail puller and replace with screws. The magnets are cheap enough so that half a dozen give you a nice line down the stud. Screws are a lot kinder on the board and no worries about fixing cupboards etc.Surprising how easysome of the nails come out. Beware at joints in the board where two nails are often clouted in close to each other.

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  • pgs070947 commented on stevemoseley's instructable Shop Vac Squid Brush18 days ago
    Shop Vac Squid Brush

    Probaly too late.Very similar item already on sale on one of the "gadget" channels.However, 1/4" OD PE tube with a good wall thickness is going tolast a lot longer, plus you get a lifetime supply of tubing.Slightly off subject, I use the nylon version of the tubing for greenhouse watering.

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  • pgs070947 commented on jessyratfink's instructable Hanging Plant Headboard24 days ago
    Hanging Plant Headboard

    Ref the taking plants out of bedrooms and hospital wards, I'm quite certain that this is just a very old wives tale, but if my mother said it's what happened, them it must be true. It's as plausible as sanatoriums for curing TB.I'm a retired environmental scientist and specialized in CO2 levels in the atmosphere. The current level of 400-ppm is certainly higher than the levels I encountered in 1972 of 320-ppm, but I would have no concerns about plants in reasonable numbers being in any room in a house. If there is any science behind it, then you would have to look at plant respiration and photosynthesis and possibly the ratio of oxygen to CO2 does change slightly in situations like intensive greenhouse horticulture. Given a certain amount of natural ventilation, there shouldn't be a pro...

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    Ref the taking plants out of bedrooms and hospital wards, I'm quite certain that this is just a very old wives tale, but if my mother said it's what happened, them it must be true. It's as plausible as sanatoriums for curing TB.I'm a retired environmental scientist and specialized in CO2 levels in the atmosphere. The current level of 400-ppm is certainly higher than the levels I encountered in 1972 of 320-ppm, but I would have no concerns about plants in reasonable numbers being in any room in a house. If there is any science behind it, then you would have to look at plant respiration and photosynthesis and possibly the ratio of oxygen to CO2 does change slightly in situations like intensive greenhouse horticulture. Given a certain amount of natural ventilation, there shouldn't be a problem. 400-ppm is 0.04%. The main problem with raised CO2 levels is that it reduces the oxygen (partial pressure), but it only becomes a problem when oxygen the "normal" level of 20.9% drops to something like 16%. Very high levels of CO2 cause asphyxiation and death, but are only encountered in special situations like wells and breweries. I don't think you have anything to worry about

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  • pgs070947 commented on charlesglorioso's instructable StreetWriter27 days ago
    StreetWriter

    I too like the use of the fuel injectors - never would have thought of that.The nearest I got to that was to use the windscreen washer pump in a garden sprayer - tirned out to be the best sprayer I've never had to buy.Opens up all sorts of other uses in , say, cleaning parts, horticulture.The long-term challenge has to be in stpping the nozzle blocking. Lab suppliers like Whatman do small in-line disposable filters.All in all, a great project

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  • pgs070947 commented on Creative Mother's instructable DIY Cardboard Pirate Ship4 weeks ago
    DIY Cardboard Pirate Ship

    I like card models.Scale models of buildings that I've seen somewhere.Another favorite are the card models of railway buidings like Superquick.Amazing just how strong cardboard can be when used the way you have. Looks good enough to sail.

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  • pgs070947 commented on ClenseYourPallet's instructable Pliers Organizer Thingy4 weeks ago
    Pliers Organizer Thingy

    What great tools pliers are, plus all the variants like snips, side-cutters, scissors?, Moles, pincers and so on. Like a surgeon about to operate. Same principal, mechanical advantage, pivot, long arm, short arm and gravity to hang them with. I must use pliers every day for something or other.I like it.

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  • pgs070947 commented on jessyratfink's instructable Hanging Plant Headboard5 weeks ago
    Hanging Plant Headboard

    Could lead to some interesting night-time surprises.Creepy crawlies and the effects of over-watering.My mother, going back a bit, always used to say that plants were removed from bedrooms at night. This also applied to hospital wards where bunches of flowers were removed.If there is any scientific reason, it might be to do with plant respiration. In daylight, plant cells give out oxygen - good - in darkness, plants give out carbon dioxide - bad.Carbon dioxide is denser than air, so unless you have some good ventilation, you might get more than you bargained for.As a practical scientist, I have to say, I think the risk is small, but it's worth a mention. The odd worm might be more of a problem.

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  • pgs070947 commented on taste_the_code's instructable Non Contact Voltage Detector5 weeks ago
    Non Contact Voltage Detector

    Yes, even the professional ones are not reliable.Might be OK to say "watch out", but I still wouldn't rely on them - they give false positives and false negatives.A metal detector might be a better bet.

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  • Motion Activated Automatic LED Stair Lighting With Arduino

    Looks good.Stairs are pretty dangerous if not well lit and the older you get, the more likely you'll have a slip.Anything that saves messing about trying to find the light switch is a bonus.

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  • pgs070947 commented on Zachary Goode's instructable Faux Nixie Tube Clock6 weeks ago
    Faux Nixie Tube Clock

    Nice use of acrylic.A perfect material when you need to illuminate from a remote lighting source.I think the Russians still use Nixie (Burroughs) tubes in their space capsules - not serious.Nixie tubes are a fine example of necessity being the Mother of Invention. Burroughs made calculators and primitive computers or tabulators which could work quite quickly but there was no numerical display to match. LEDs came along to provide matrices and things like alphanumeric displays, now OLEDs and LCDs are commonly available.The older methods are often more decorative in their own right. A classic example is the "flip" displays that used to be used in rail stations and airports. I think it was an Italian design and still preferred in design conscious settings. It amuses me to see LED ...

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    Nice use of acrylic.A perfect material when you need to illuminate from a remote lighting source.I think the Russians still use Nixie (Burroughs) tubes in their space capsules - not serious.Nixie tubes are a fine example of necessity being the Mother of Invention. Burroughs made calculators and primitive computers or tabulators which could work quite quickly but there was no numerical display to match. LEDs came along to provide matrices and things like alphanumeric displays, now OLEDs and LCDs are commonly available.The older methods are often more decorative in their own right. A classic example is the "flip" displays that used to be used in rail stations and airports. I think it was an Italian design and still preferred in design conscious settings. It amuses me to see LED versions of old style filament lamps.

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  • pgs070947 commented on AdrienR's instructable Screw Sorting Machine6 weeks ago
    Screw Sorting Machine

    Interesting.The sort of job I used to do on a sunny afternoon armed with a strip of aluminum with holes drilled in and scale down the side, plus plenty of empty coleslaw tubs.First sort by type e.g. machine or wood-screw etc, then sort by diameter, then sort by material, then sort by head, pan, cheese-head, Philips, Pozidrive, Torx, socket, slotted and so on.Then remember not to get in the mess in the first place - no chance. Food ingredient sorting machines are some of the smartest. They seem to rely on camera recognition and compressed air to sort.

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  • VERBIS - Desktop 8x8 RGB LED Matrix Word Clock

    Nicely done and very thorough.Clocks lend themselves to all sorts of interpretation.

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  • pgs070947 commented on JulioC150's instructable How to Solder Copper Pipe in a Wall7 weeks ago
    How to Solder Copper Pipe in a Wall

    Well done for being brave enough to tackle a subject like this when everyone else has their favourite methods and tales of what might go wrong. I'm not sure what is meant by one of the comments talking about "stuffing" things into water systems. Any plumber or DIYer ought to know the importance of cleanliness. Sticking to the letter of the law, any new work should be flushed in any case. Flushing and adding corrosion inhibitors is often a condition fulfilling the warranty terms of things like boilers. Most cases of reported Legionella arise from poorly maintained storage tanks in commercial properties and not down to the original plumbing.Plastic systems have their place, but quite often a rigid joint is needed and in high heat situations, can't be used. Knowing the basic skil...

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    Well done for being brave enough to tackle a subject like this when everyone else has their favourite methods and tales of what might go wrong. I'm not sure what is meant by one of the comments talking about "stuffing" things into water systems. Any plumber or DIYer ought to know the importance of cleanliness. Sticking to the letter of the law, any new work should be flushed in any case. Flushing and adding corrosion inhibitors is often a condition fulfilling the warranty terms of things like boilers. Most cases of reported Legionella arise from poorly maintained storage tanks in commercial properties and not down to the original plumbing.Plastic systems have their place, but quite often a rigid joint is needed and in high heat situations, can't be used. Knowing the basic skills is essential.

    All the plumbers I know are too tight to spend the extra on solder ring fittingsPlus, there is a bit of smugness that capillary fittings take a bit more skill and solder rings are a bit DIY.Personally, I think capillary fittings make for a better looking finished job and getting a slim joint with no dollops of excess solder is where tte real skill shows.

    Depends on which part of the planet you live.In UK, try Monument Autocut available from Screwfix. For £17, you get the 15-mm cutter and the handle (basically, a "C" spanner). Alternatively, try a strap wrench or pump pliers. Strictly speaking, you shouldn't really need a handle

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  • pgs070947 commented on AdamM360's instructable Instant Pot Chicken Tikka Masala2 months ago
    Instant Pot Chicken Tikka Masala

    YummyMy sort of nosh.

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  • pgs070947 commented on khinds10's instructable AtticTemp - Temperature / Climate Logger2 months ago
    AtticTemp - Temperature / Climate Logger

    Comprehensive project.Attics/loft/roof-spaces are the forgotten areas in a house and I log temperatures there as well.Unventilated roof-spaces can turn into tropical forests if left neglected. A combination of humidity from the living areas, cold felt, can soon lead to trouble.In summer, I've recorded temperatures under the tiles of 60-degrees Celsius and even in winter, the tiles can get to 25-degrees on sunny days, providing a useful heat source.Of course it's useful to have a display.

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  • pgs070947 commented on DiggingFox's instructable Resistor Organizer2 months ago
    Resistor Organizer

    Old idea I'm afraid.A lot of the suppliers throw in the stand for free.The only advantage of doing all the 3-D printing work is if you want your stand to fit a particular space.One of the problems with disposable plastic test tubes is there are too many changes of stock, material and design.I used to use some nice screw cap tubes with white writable caps, but seem to have gone the way of all good things.For really small component storage, look up micro centrifuge tubes.

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  • pgs070947 commented on JulioC150's instructable The ULTIMATE Leaky Copper Pipe Fix Guide2 months ago
    The ULTIMATE Leaky Copper Pipe Fix Guide

    A couple of points.Compression joints are great provided everything, especially the pipe, is in good condition, no deep scratches, dents, out of round etc.If a potable water supply is leaking, and pipe sealant needs to be for potable use (applies to solders as well).I often use the thicker gas grade PTFE tape wound tightly in the same direction as the nut tightening direction to cover the olive/ferrule. Remember there are several points of contact between pipe, ferrule and fitting that need to be leak-free. The nice thing is that the tape is inert and clean.An experienced plumber friend of mine warned about sealant holding up a joint while cold, but failing when something like hot central heating water went through.What can help with compression fittings is pre-swaging. This is where yo...

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    A couple of points.Compression joints are great provided everything, especially the pipe, is in good condition, no deep scratches, dents, out of round etc.If a potable water supply is leaking, and pipe sealant needs to be for potable use (applies to solders as well).I often use the thicker gas grade PTFE tape wound tightly in the same direction as the nut tightening direction to cover the olive/ferrule. Remember there are several points of contact between pipe, ferrule and fitting that need to be leak-free. The nice thing is that the tape is inert and clean.An experienced plumber friend of mine warned about sealant holding up a joint while cold, but failing when something like hot central heating water went through.What can help with compression fittings is pre-swaging. This is where you get the ferrule bedded down on the pipe before you add the sealant. One of the top makes of fittings called Swagelok, have a two part ferrule, use no sealant and use a gauge between nut and fitting body to ensure the correct torque. No sealant joints are important for high (300-bar) pressure gas e.g. oxygen, pipework.In an emergency, a pair of Mole grips can come in handy, especially with plastic pipe.I once put a fork through a shallow buried yellow PE gas pipe. The utility guys turned up, dug out a pair of large Moles with two round bars where the jaws are and simply squashed the pipe flat - garages use the same technique to seal off flexible hoses like brake or fuel lines.With all joints and repairs, don't forget the blue Kimwipes tissue to test for leaks - blue shows better than white and distiguishes between water and oily sealant.

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  • Cleaning a Bicycle Chain With "Eternal" Kerosene.  (Includes the Kerosene Recycling Stand)

    I agree with the labelling issue, but demented old people? Not very nice

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  • pgs070947 commented on Hans_Daniel's instructable Tube Audio Amplifier7 months ago
    Tube Audio Amplifier

    Ahh - the smell of dusty old valves and the anticipation of the Home Service.A lot of classy amplifiers had nice hardwood side panels in the days of popular HiFi and aluminium panels.The laminated auluminium sheet you don't know the name of sounds like rainshield cladding material they used in the Grenfell tower block that caught fire. It goes under several trade names none of which I can remember, but a quick search on Grenfell tower block rainshield cladding will throw up the supplier. It's probably easier to use than raw or anodised aluminium sheet. However, it doesn't like heat.

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  • pgs070947 commented on fmarzocca's instructable UltraV: a Portable UV-index Meter7 months ago
    UltraV: a Portable UV-index Meter

    A bit of a long shot, but maybe have a look at scientific glassware. I have used fused silica dishes in the past and some spectroscopy methods using UV will use cuvettes that are UV transparent. A diamond tile drill should be able to cut a small disk. Have you investigated all the main classes of plastics? The other thing that comes to mind are microscope slide cover slips which are very thin glass, albeit a bit fragile

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  • pgs070947 commented on OEsirik's instructable RF Transmitter and Receiver7 months ago
    RF Transmitter and Receiver

    The 433 frequency is pretty crowded and most remote control systems will use some form of encoding/decoding either Keeloq or Manchester, possibly Holtek. I have agree with other comments about the choice of PIC, but interestingly, some commercial encoder/decoder chips are based on PIC. These chips are cheap enough to make it economical to use them, but for Arduino users, Nick Gammon has written some Manchester code and there is a Manchester library as well. Keeloq is a Microchip proprietary system and might be heavy going for anyone who just wants a couple of on/off channels.

    There are a few systems around, but the only ones I've seen have been based on Xbee modules. A little pricey, but you do get a useful number of digitals and analogue in/outs. Xbee will do this Instructable out of the box without additional MCUs

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  • pgs070947 commented on gzumwalt's instructable Red Baron Hand Launched Glider7 months ago
    Red Baron Hand Launched Glider

    I missed the significance of the magnets.What a great way to add the balance and adjust it.Brilliant design

    I like it.I used to spend hours on these simple "chuck"/"stick" gliders as a kid - no screens to distract then.Your design has a lot of potential.

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  • pgs070947 commented on Pablos Casita's instructable LED-light for Drill Press7 months ago
    LED-light for Drill Press

    I like itA good bright light helps (and makes more safe) any operation like drilling and soldering - also would make a good microscope illuminator.I would have to agree that a transformer is not a great way to drive an LED, but it will work.For LEDs that need constant current, I use specific LED driver chips. Microchip do a 20-mA driver in a TO92 package called a CL20 or similar. They can take any input voltage up to 90-Volts

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  • pgs070947 commented on JacobP117's instructable Popcorn Ceiling Removal Tool8 months ago
    Popcorn Ceiling Removal Tool

    I am careful and as Hons Chemist and PhD Environmental Scientis, I have a lot of respect for asbestos abnd all the other nasties I worked with including organo-chloine pestcides, benzene, Rhodamine-b, Americium 241 etc. Handling all this stuff is all down to proper procedure. I fully sympathise with your relative's exposure and disease caused by asbestos. Many innocent workers in boilermaking, shipyards, pipe-lagging, brake-pads etc were exposed to asbestos before manufacturers and workers and governments were aware of the problems. What is particularly nasty about asbestos is the long interval between exposure and symptoms. At the time, legislation was missing, manufacturers used what was available. Even now, glyphosate is being hammered. Glyphosate is safe if handled correctly and in ...

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    I am careful and as Hons Chemist and PhD Environmental Scientis, I have a lot of respect for asbestos abnd all the other nasties I worked with including organo-chloine pestcides, benzene, Rhodamine-b, Americium 241 etc. Handling all this stuff is all down to proper procedure. I fully sympathise with your relative's exposure and disease caused by asbestos. Many innocent workers in boilermaking, shipyards, pipe-lagging, brake-pads etc were exposed to asbestos before manufacturers and workers and governments were aware of the problems. What is particularly nasty about asbestos is the long interval between exposure and symptoms. At the time, legislation was missing, manufacturers used what was available. Even now, glyphosate is being hammered. Glyphosate is safe if handled correctly and in food production is almost essential. The guys working in this Instructable are clearly taking a risk. It is a health and safety nightmare. Old properties and textured finishes should be setting off alarm bells, but if you don't do your homework first, you take your chances. What could be safer than stripping off old ceilings?

    Sounds pretty cheap.As far as I know, the accepted test involves examination under a microscope using polarised light

    I don't think so - it would probably end up looking worse. I guess you are after a flat finish. I would resurface with a skimming plaster or even remove the old board altoghether (with the safety provisos). Many professionals say it's easier and quicker to take the old board down

    I'll endorse the safety comments.These "decorative" finishes were popular for years, sometimes used decoratively, sometimes used to cover damaged or poorly constructed ceilings.If it is a sponge or tool applied finish, it would have been made up of a powder paste commonly known as Artex in the UK (the plant that made it is not far from where I live, and is in the centre of a small town).As far as I know, the powder contained asbestos up until about 1986, but that takes no account of old stock etc.. I also don't know which type of asbestos it was, i.e. white, brown or blue. White, the less damaging form was commonly used to strengthen cement and these finishes. Left alone, or painted etc., it is not likely to pose a risk.The only sure way is to have a small sample tested by an ...

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    I'll endorse the safety comments.These "decorative" finishes were popular for years, sometimes used decoratively, sometimes used to cover damaged or poorly constructed ceilings.If it is a sponge or tool applied finish, it would have been made up of a powder paste commonly known as Artex in the UK (the plant that made it is not far from where I live, and is in the centre of a small town).As far as I know, the powder contained asbestos up until about 1986, but that takes no account of old stock etc.. I also don't know which type of asbestos it was, i.e. white, brown or blue. White, the less damaging form was commonly used to strengthen cement and these finishes. Left alone, or painted etc., it is not likely to pose a risk.The only sure way is to have a small sample tested by an accredited laboratory.If you must do it yourself, and I have, I would use a binding agent like PVA to keep it wet, and all clothing and dust sheets must be treated as contaminated. Many cancer sufferers were relatives of people who worked with asbestos (pity the people who mined the stuff) and washed overalls etc.Surprisingly, some local authority disposal sites will accept asbestos waste as long as it is double bagged.Unfortunately, asbestos cement was widely used for roofing, rainwater goods like gutters, fire-breaks, soffit boards etc. and is lurking in many older hoses.Personally, I think if you observe good hygiene and personal protective clothing and avoid creating dry waste, there is little risk, assuming it is the white variety.My approach if you are after a smooth finish would be to either apply a skim coat of new plaster, or better still, fit a new plasterboard ceiling with adhesive - I find the 9-mm board works quite well. But plasterboard is also getting a bad press now from the waste site operators. Plasterboard is gypsum (calcium sulphate) based, mined from the ground, but apparently, when put into anaerobic landfill sites, gives rise to toxic hydrogen sulphide - you can't win.

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  • pgs070947 commented on kgklinkel's instructable Simple RFID Blocking Wallet9 months ago
    Simple RFID Blocking Wallet

    In ventilation duct-work, self-adhesive aluminium tape is often used. It has a really strong adhesive backing and is particularly useful for molding round odd shapes. It is classed as Class 0 in the UK at least (i.e. fully conductive) and has caused some fatalities where it inadvertently comes into contact with a live conductor.I remember my mother having a fine chain mail purse (way before RFID) and high voltage linesmen use chain mail overalls for working on distribution systems. Meat processing workers also use chain mail for various items of protection against knives etc. The advantage of chain mail is that it's fully flexible

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  • pgs070947 commented on Nickolae's instructable UpCyled Bookshelf Speakers10 months ago
    UpCyled Bookshelf Speakers

    Nice job.Try Osmo Polyx-oil for a finish on white oak etc. Gives a far more natural finish than varnish and is very hard wearing

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  • pgs070947 commented on Auroris's instructable Pet Teepee/House10 months ago
  • pgs070947 commented on jcbuchli's instructable Cedar Strip Kayak11 months ago
    Cedar Strip Kayak

    Does look really nice and worth hanging on the wall one day.You are lucky to have the workshop facilities, but more importantly, some decent waterways to use it on.

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  • pgs070947 commented on 3leftturns's instructable Philosophy of Shop Organization11 months ago
    Philosophy of Shop Organization

    If you are lucky enough to have single large space like a barn with some benches, shelving and a decent floor, organising a workshop is straightforward. If you are stuck with a garage and a bedroom or two, it's a lot more difficult.Hanging tools on loops of thin cord maximises hook usage. Magnets can hold loads of small tools. Test tubes (plastic) and TicTac cartons can hold small bits and pieces and tubs used for coleslaw etc. stack well and you can see the contents. Tin cans, plastic waste pipe can take nails and screws and long items. Even plastic guttering comes in useful for long rods etc. For temporary sorting, manilla money envelopes are handy. Take a look in the supermarket rubbish bins for molded transit cases etc.If the memory isn't too good, keep a note of where you last used...

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    If you are lucky enough to have single large space like a barn with some benches, shelving and a decent floor, organising a workshop is straightforward. If you are stuck with a garage and a bedroom or two, it's a lot more difficult.Hanging tools on loops of thin cord maximises hook usage. Magnets can hold loads of small tools. Test tubes (plastic) and TicTac cartons can hold small bits and pieces and tubs used for coleslaw etc. stack well and you can see the contents. Tin cans, plastic waste pipe can take nails and screws and long items. Even plastic guttering comes in useful for long rods etc. For temporary sorting, manilla money envelopes are handy. Take a look in the supermarket rubbish bins for molded transit cases etc.If the memory isn't too good, keep a note of where you last used tools.

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  • pgs070947 commented on Techgenie's instructable DIY - Coil Winding Machine11 months ago
    DIY - Coil Winding Machine

    It's just enamelled (polyurethane) insulated single conductor wire (sometimes called hookup wire)Any of the distributors do it (Farnell, RS etc) - got my last lot from RS part number 357-722, about 30 Standard Wire Gauge. Use it mainly for low frequency radio reception loop antenna. Don't bother stripping it, just solder with a hot tip - the enamel is designed to be soldered

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  • pgs070947 commented on Ryan110's instructable Soil Sieve Sifter Machine11 months ago
    Soil Sieve Sifter Machine

    I like this a lot.I can see from the vehicles that you are UK based, but where you are looks a lot better off soil-wise from the solid chalk I live on.To get anything like growing soil, I used to have to sieve everything and was going to make an oscillating riddle, but I was also thinking along the lines of using a concrete mixer to mix compost.It's a cracking idea and must save a lot of backache.To miguipda, Belle mixers are widely available in UK and Europe and any of the big suppliers like Toolstation, Screwfix or Axminster Power Tools will list them as well as spare drums etc.

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  • pgs070947 commented on Sebastiaan Mollema's instructable Staircase Drawers !12 months ago
    Staircase Drawers !

    I always like making use of wasted space and stairwells are one of the big wasters of space. I use part of the space as a service duct for ventilation pipework and the space under a winding staircase makes for a secure hidey-hole for valuables.I fear that in the UK at least, you might fall foul of Building Regulations. Stairways are your means of escape in the event of fire and this needs to be taken into account.The leaving drawers open would also worry me. Having taken a tumble down stairs and getting a broken pelvis as a reward has left its mark. I would want to see some mechanism in place such rthat the closed drawer state is the default - better runners and tilted back to self close would help. The thought of treading down onto an open drawer doesn't bear thinking about.By turning ...

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    I always like making use of wasted space and stairwells are one of the big wasters of space. I use part of the space as a service duct for ventilation pipework and the space under a winding staircase makes for a secure hidey-hole for valuables.I fear that in the UK at least, you might fall foul of Building Regulations. Stairways are your means of escape in the event of fire and this needs to be taken into account.The leaving drawers open would also worry me. Having taken a tumble down stairs and getting a broken pelvis as a reward has left its mark. I would want to see some mechanism in place such rthat the closed drawer state is the default - better runners and tilted back to self close would help. The thought of treading down onto an open drawer doesn't bear thinking about.By turning the riser, a structural component, into a non-structural component, you are severely weakening the treads. I would like to see how much bow you get in the treads with the drawers removed. Your treads need to be structurally sound with the drawers removed.Not trying to be picky, but all aspects of a design need to be thought through

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  • pgs070947 commented on mr_fid's instructable How to CUT GLASS.1 year ago
    How to CUT GLASS.

    The key ingredients in cutting glass are confidence, a high quality TC wheel cutter, a dish of white spirit and speed. I have never had any luck with a diamond tipped cutter and these are only good for writing your name. Thoroughly clean the glass along the cut line. Dip the glass cutter into the white spirit. Start away from you, a short scribe to the furthest edge, then all the way back in one scribe. Speed is the essence. If it's a long cut on a work surface, pull the glass towards you so it overlaps the edge, hold either side of the scribe, lift and peel apart like opening a book. If that doesn't work, first blame the scribing, then put a nail or a barbeque skewer exactly under the scribe and push down either side. If that doesn't work, use a "V" notch tile plier/cutter at...

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    The key ingredients in cutting glass are confidence, a high quality TC wheel cutter, a dish of white spirit and speed. I have never had any luck with a diamond tipped cutter and these are only good for writing your name. Thoroughly clean the glass along the cut line. Dip the glass cutter into the white spirit. Start away from you, a short scribe to the furthest edge, then all the way back in one scribe. Speed is the essence. If it's a long cut on a work surface, pull the glass towards you so it overlaps the edge, hold either side of the scribe, lift and peel apart like opening a book. If that doesn't work, first blame the scribing, then put a nail or a barbeque skewer exactly under the scribe and push down either side. If that doesn't work, use a "V" notch tile plier/cutter at the edge. For thick plate glass, a Rubi type tile cutter works well

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  • pgs070947 commented on oliverb's instructable Arduino Perpetual Calendar Clock1 year ago
    Arduino Perpetual Calendar Clock

    Another very nice clock - a lot of work gone in here.I struggle where I am to get a signal from either MSF or DCF.Well done

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  • Battery Cases for Electronic Kits.

    If you have a device like an MCU that can sleep to save battery life, you can use a reed switch and magnet to activate it in a sealed case.Neat little assemblies - I use steel or nylon spacers a lot to stack boards.I also use Acrylic like yours to in layers to embed sensors if you need to see what's going on underneath like utility metersNeat PCBs

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  • pgs070947 commented on mxx's instructable Unclogging Rust-Oleum Nozzle1 year ago
    Unclogging Rust-Oleum Nozzle

    Yes, they are designed to frustrate and waste loads of time and money like cartridges of silicone - the tradesmen have got the right idea - charge it to the customer and just use new ones each time. It does make sense in the long run.Poking things in the spray nozzle generally messes up the spray pattern - an aggressive solvent is probably the best bet. The nozzles are probably polypropylene or polyethylene so won't be touched in the short term by most solvents.If the contents are water-based, either water or caustic soda might soften up enough.If solvent based, aggressive solvents like chloromethane, methyl ethyl ketone, acetone, xylene or even meth's - your best chance is to get the nozzle off straightaway into solvent then a soft bristle like a toothbrush fibreSame strategy applies ...

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    Yes, they are designed to frustrate and waste loads of time and money like cartridges of silicone - the tradesmen have got the right idea - charge it to the customer and just use new ones each time. It does make sense in the long run.Poking things in the spray nozzle generally messes up the spray pattern - an aggressive solvent is probably the best bet. The nozzles are probably polypropylene or polyethylene so won't be touched in the short term by most solvents.If the contents are water-based, either water or caustic soda might soften up enough.If solvent based, aggressive solvents like chloromethane, methyl ethyl ketone, acetone, xylene or even meth's - your best chance is to get the nozzle off straightaway into solvent then a soft bristle like a toothbrush fibreSame strategy applies to decent paint brushes - don't use the same one all day, but swap regularly and get them straight into solvent or whatever after 30-minutes or so

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  • Tuna Can Swing Out Storage Tower

    I always look at items before throwing out and that includes tuna cans.I mainly just clean them up and use for nuts, bolts screws etcThey stack nicely and get a white insulation tape label.Other no-throw items are the clear plastic tubs you get houmous or similar in for same reason as the cans but they stack better - ideal for little projects or disassembled parts. TicTac containers are ideal or very small parts and small glass jars do the rounds for mixing gravy in the microwave - yes, quite safe - or breakfast fruit juice (I always break the posh ones)If you reuse something just once before chucking, it does us all a favour.

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  • pgs070947 commented on Penolopy Bulnick's instructable How to Dehydrate Marshmallows1 year ago
    How to Dehydrate Marshmallows

    Never come across a dehydrator before. Is it just a controlled hot air oven or is there some other trickery like a desiccant or vacuum involved?In laboratories, you come across desiccators that have silica gel or molecular sieve in them, often combined with a vacuum pump, thus the vacuum desiccator. They generally don't need additional heat.

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  • pgs070947 commented on david0429's instructable How to Tap/Thread Wood1 year ago
    How to Tap/Thread Wood

    Another method comes to mind which is to use repair "springs" They are generally used to screw into a larger damaged thread, then screw in a smaller thread size. If pushed into a hole drilled into the wood, the spring would expand and give you a metal rather than wood thread surface."T" nuts are designed for wood, but work best when on the opposite side of the timber.

    A method used by engineers to recover a damaged thread when they don't have the right tap. An angle grinder might be a bit fierce for that - generally, cutting the slot across the threads is best done with a hacksaw

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  • pgs070947 commented on Jonny Builds's instructable How to Build a Modern Platform Bed1 year ago
    How to Build a Modern Platform Bed

    Looks nice.Dropping the mattress into the frame stops it sliding down the bed as you lean back against the headboard.The "shelf" provides somewhere to tie the shoe laces or store all those little nick nacks.

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  • Drilling Metal With a Drill Press

    Didn't see it mentioned, but good lighting is a must. Industrial grade machines almost always come with worklamps already fitted. A cheap option is to use an adjustable LED ceiling spotlight or even a decent torch to really light up where you are going drill. As an alternative to a centre punch, use a small ~ 2-mm bit to spot where you want to go in. Where space permits, I push the bit as far up the chuck as it will go to reduce wobble. And always respect the machine and bits - a large diameter bit that snatches can do a lot of damage

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  • pgs070947 commented on Thingking's instructable Water Saving Toilet-Mounted Basin1 year ago
    Water Saving Toilet-Mounted Basin

    For second cistern, read second large header tank in the loft area.It's all part of a much larger rainwater collection system which has evolved over the years and includes a sand filter at the roof downpipe end.To keep the water sterile, I add a dash of sodium hypochlorite (domestic bleach).I'm not sure that I would really want to use it for teeth brushing, but for everything else, it's fine. A lot depends on roof construction and concrete tiles in particular collect a lot of rubbish. In well over ten years use, I have never had a health issue that could be related. As an ex-water scientist, I have no issues with the water as used. My potable water consumption has shrunk from the national average of 150-litres per day to below 10-litres. It's a win-win system and has much more signific...

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    For second cistern, read second large header tank in the loft area.It's all part of a much larger rainwater collection system which has evolved over the years and includes a sand filter at the roof downpipe end.To keep the water sterile, I add a dash of sodium hypochlorite (domestic bleach).I'm not sure that I would really want to use it for teeth brushing, but for everything else, it's fine. A lot depends on roof construction and concrete tiles in particular collect a lot of rubbish. In well over ten years use, I have never had a health issue that could be related. As an ex-water scientist, I have no issues with the water as used. My potable water consumption has shrunk from the national average of 150-litres per day to below 10-litres. It's a win-win system and has much more significant benefits to the whole water supply and waste disposal industry that it is too long to list here. What it does do is turn rainy days into raw material collection days

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  • pgs070947 commented on Thingking's instructable Water Saving Toilet-Mounted Basin1 year ago
    Water Saving Toilet-Mounted Basin

    Better still, just use a bucket of rainwater.Main advantage is that it's soft water, so no descaling chemicals if you live in a hard water area.I have sized it up a bit to cover a lot of other things, but so far, used about 40-tonnes (40000-litres) of rainwater. Bills cut to absolute minimum. Makes all sorts of washing a pleasure.Have to agree with comment that it makes no sense to flush waste away with drinking water - takes a he amount of effort to produce, then rendered useless in the WC.

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  • pgs070947 commented on JON-A-TRON's instructable Thread ID Tool1 year ago
    Thread ID Tool

    Just the ticket for sorting all those tins of unknown nuts and screws and washers that used to be sorted until the jobs came along.Like the others have said, there are several pitches for most diameters and it gets worse the larger the screw diameter. I'm no expert, but they seem to kick in for diameters above M5 or M6 and I have just bought some metric taps for M7 0.75 and M8 0.75. A lot of panel mounted electronic components use these finer pitches. For plastic enclosures with walls thicker than the component available thread, tapping the wall is the easiest option

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  • pgs070947 commented on NicK_RSA's instructable Watersaving: Shower Mixer Alternative1 year ago
    Watersaving: Shower Mixer Alternative

    Very true. Washing 250-ml of urine with 5-10 litres of potable water makes no sense whatsoever. For the less squeamish, a couple of day's worth of poo doesn't matter either. A far better solution is to use the urine on the compost heap and adopt dry composting lavvies. The key to all this is make use of all the natural sources like rainwater, restrict tap or potable water to what the name suggests and be creative. I even collect the condensate water from the gas condensing boiler and whole body washing daily is a thing of the past.

    The author is using a quarter turn ball valve. The valve can be operated by a screwdriver, a thumb-turn or short lever as used and for you, a long lever version would be the best option. The long lever can be 100-mm long and colour-coded.There is a problem with quarter turn valves that relates to construction, water quality and usage.Cheap valves use cheap materials like poor seals and stuff like plated brass balls. For long term use, get a decent branded valve with a stainless steel ball. Cheap valves corrode in aggressive water and leak. They also tend to seize up, hence the usage bit.Another bit of advice, valves come in normal bore or full bore. If it's a low pressure system, get a full bore valve.There are other more expensive options like solenoid valves that can be electronicall...

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    The author is using a quarter turn ball valve. The valve can be operated by a screwdriver, a thumb-turn or short lever as used and for you, a long lever version would be the best option. The long lever can be 100-mm long and colour-coded.There is a problem with quarter turn valves that relates to construction, water quality and usage.Cheap valves use cheap materials like poor seals and stuff like plated brass balls. For long term use, get a decent branded valve with a stainless steel ball. Cheap valves corrode in aggressive water and leak. They also tend to seize up, hence the usage bit.Another bit of advice, valves come in normal bore or full bore. If it's a low pressure system, get a full bore valve.There are other more expensive options like solenoid valves that can be electronically timed and would need no user intervention.

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  • pgs070947 commented on NicK_RSA's instructable Watersaving: Shower Mixer Alternative1 year ago
    Watersaving: Shower Mixer Alternative

    A plumbing tip. If you turn your spool of PTFE tap over and wind the tape clockwise round the thread, it will keep taut while you're doing it. I'm guessing that the yellow spool is the thicker gas grade tape which I find is the best for most threads. Another thing you can do, is run the edge of a file across the threads to create a bit of roughness to stop the tape unwinding - doesn't affect the seal and many commercial threads (Danfoss for example) come already serrated.On droughts generaaly, one of the problems is using potable water for tasks that don't need highly purified water, like flushing the lavvy - rain water (collect as much as you can) or "grey" water is all that's needed and if you're not squeamish, you really don't need to flush it every time.The only potable wa...

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    A plumbing tip. If you turn your spool of PTFE tap over and wind the tape clockwise round the thread, it will keep taut while you're doing it. I'm guessing that the yellow spool is the thicker gas grade tape which I find is the best for most threads. Another thing you can do, is run the edge of a file across the threads to create a bit of roughness to stop the tape unwinding - doesn't affect the seal and many commercial threads (Danfoss for example) come already serrated.On droughts generaaly, one of the problems is using potable water for tasks that don't need highly purified water, like flushing the lavvy - rain water (collect as much as you can) or "grey" water is all that's needed and if you're not squeamish, you really don't need to flush it every time.The only potable water I use now is for drinking and food preparation - everything else is either reused or from water butts.

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  • pgs070947 commented on makendo's instructable DIY Laminate Countertops1 year ago
    DIY Laminate Countertops

    Finished job looks nice - who needs kitchen fitters?

    This is how worktops used to be done with Formica and EvoStick - Formica is still going strong and the original stuff was far tougher than the newer post formed stuff.A couple of tips - a laminate trimmer is fine provided the ball race runs smoothly. If it doesn't, it will put a nice line all along the edge of your surface which you won't want.I used to use router to square of a commercial worktop to stop splintering, but having seen the results from a decent circular saw with a new fine tooth carbide blade fitted. Cut from the "wrong" side and the finish is absolutely perfect, couldn't believe just how good. It's worth getting a new blade just for one job. For thinner laminate, cutting the over-hanging laminate with a sanding block with carbide paper at a 45-degree angle work...

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    This is how worktops used to be done with Formica and EvoStick - Formica is still going strong and the original stuff was far tougher than the newer post formed stuff.A couple of tips - a laminate trimmer is fine provided the ball race runs smoothly. If it doesn't, it will put a nice line all along the edge of your surface which you won't want.I used to use router to square of a commercial worktop to stop splintering, but having seen the results from a decent circular saw with a new fine tooth carbide blade fitted. Cut from the "wrong" side and the finish is absolutely perfect, couldn't believe just how good. It's worth getting a new blade just for one job. For thinner laminate, cutting the over-hanging laminate with a sanding block with carbide paper at a 45-degree angle works well - with the laminate trimmer, one mistake can be costly.

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  • pgs070947 commented on Mikhandmaker.'s instructable Homemade Lathe for Drill Press1 year ago
    Homemade Lathe for Drill Press

    A bit too ambitious.. A bowl would need a huge amount of torque and a drill angle drive isn't going to be up to it. Full size bowl turning lathes are massively built. I'd give less than 30-seconds before the bowl becomes a flying saucer. Bevel gears or cable drives aren't the most efficient at the best of times. One snag on a tool and there's going to be a lot of grief. Having said that, it's still a nice example of lateral thinking.

    When I read the title, I had visions of the drill press lying on it's side, but the right angled drive solves that.Just a word of warning though, if a right angle drive decides to come loose anytime, the results can be scary - treat with respect. I would also watch the running time as some of these drill accessory drives aren't built to last.

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  • pgs070947 commented on Nematic!'s instructable How to Fix Fried Arduino Nano/Uno/Mega1 year ago
    How to Fix Fried Arduino Nano/Uno/Mega

    Yes, you're right. The spec is hold at 500-mA, but as Bourns describe as "trip" at 1000-mA. The point is there is no need to replace unless you whack 100-A through the Uno. It's probably a bit more sophisticated than a PTC resistor, with a defined "knee". A cursory look at the schematic suggests that it only protects the USB supply, by which time you've probably crashed the PC.

    Isn't the fuse on the Uno at least, resettable?Datasheet gives it as good to 100-A, trip at 1-A typical. Normally, just letting it cool is enough.In my experience, the diode is the most likely component to burn out. Beware confusing Vin and 5-V out if connecting a supply other than though the 2.1-mm socket

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  • pgs070947 commented on mikeasaurus's instructable 5 Ways to Remove a Stripped Screw1 year ago
    5 Ways to Remove a Stripped Screw

    I suppose don't strip it in the first place is number one, but we all do it. And using decent screws and a pilot hole in tough woods saves some grief.Getting the right screwdriver helps - Philips isn't Pozidrive etc. and size does count as well - Pozi #0, #1 etc..Size 1 fits less than 3.5-mm (woodscrews), size 2 fits 3.5 to 5-mm, size 3 fits 6-mm etc.Declag the recess and tap the screwdriver into the recess.Tighten first, then see if it shifts.There used to be a useful compound called Hexagrip, RS used to do it.It's just a mixture of grease and silicon carbide grit, the same as lapping grit. might get you just enough extra bite. Diamond coated screwdriver bits can helpSide cutters can get a grip on the head sometimes, or Moles will either get it out or leave it in two halves

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  • pgs070947 commented on bryans workshop's instructable Built-in Kitchen Shelves! 1 year ago
    Built-in Kitchen Shelves!

    If your drywall is fixed with nails or screws, just use one of the super strong magnets to locate them. I pull out most of my nails and replace with screws to stop the inevitable "popping".A nice use of wasted space. The only reservations I might have is anything to do with possible fire breaks and any acoustic/insulation problems. The fire break issue could be solved by using a second backing of drywall board or one of the cement fibre backing boards.3" of Rockwool really doesn't add much acoustic attenuation.With care, you could use structural walls, as in the UK, the only real difference between load bearing and non load bearing is that one uses nominal 3" CLS and the other nominal 4". Sometimes you will find additional uprights at door and window openings, b...

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    If your drywall is fixed with nails or screws, just use one of the super strong magnets to locate them. I pull out most of my nails and replace with screws to stop the inevitable "popping".A nice use of wasted space. The only reservations I might have is anything to do with possible fire breaks and any acoustic/insulation problems. The fire break issue could be solved by using a second backing of drywall board or one of the cement fibre backing boards.3" of Rockwool really doesn't add much acoustic attenuation.With care, you could use structural walls, as in the UK, the only real difference between load bearing and non load bearing is that one uses nominal 3" CLS and the other nominal 4". Sometimes you will find additional uprights at door and window openings, but other than that, there is very little difference. When I say with care, I mean remove one upright at a time, but your shelving or whatever frame if using decent structural timber and solidly built, would be just as good. as the original studs and noggins. After all, "pocket" doors are used in structural walls. As an additional measure, I might look at some protection for the exposed timber like an intumescent paint.Nice project

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  • pgs070947 commented on AroundHome's instructable Three Clamps Racks From Scraps1 year ago
    Three Clamps Racks From Scraps

    Thank you for that - true gritMy forebears were all men of the soil, never complained, suffered badly in WW1 and WW2, and worst of all, were never recognised for their efforts.My generation, the so-called baby-boomers, get the blame for everything, for living in houses, being in hospital beds, getting a pension and so on, all at the hands of generations who have no idea and can't survive without a mobile phone. They walk past you like you are mess on the pavement or simply not there.You should be proud of all the things you achieved and long may you continue

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  • Benches and Tables Built As Stressed Skin Panels

    I'm sorry to hear that you are being ripped off, but maybe you should ask Dow Corning why a cartridge of adhesive that retails at less than £10 (and that's pricey) in the UK and so much in the States - after all Dow was originally a US company. The Sika brand is even cheaper at £6 a cartridge.I would suggest you do a bit more shopping around instead of relying on Amazon. Or maybe ask Mr Trump what he can do about it.

    EPS is hydrophobic so any water-based adhesive is going to struggle.Having said that, a prime with PVA, well scrubbed in, will take a solvent-free adhesive like Gripfill Solvent Free.One adhesive that seems to work on just about anything is (in UK at least) is one by Geocel/Dow Corning called "The Works" or Sika Sikaflex EBTI haven't found anything that this doesn't stick, works under water and I've used it for a whole string of things, including:-Bonding work surfaces together (Mason's mitre joint)Fixing PVC cladding to exterior woodworkRepairing a live water leak on a tank by mixing it with glass fibre matFixing rigid PUR insulation panelsFixing fittings in shower cubicles (no tile drilling)If you use it on wood joints, the wood will break before the adhesive, and of course,...

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    EPS is hydrophobic so any water-based adhesive is going to struggle.Having said that, a prime with PVA, well scrubbed in, will take a solvent-free adhesive like Gripfill Solvent Free.One adhesive that seems to work on just about anything is (in UK at least) is one by Geocel/Dow Corning called "The Works" or Sika Sikaflex EBTI haven't found anything that this doesn't stick, works under water and I've used it for a whole string of things, including:-Bonding work surfaces together (Mason's mitre joint)Fixing PVC cladding to exterior woodworkRepairing a live water leak on a tank by mixing it with glass fibre matFixing rigid PUR insulation panelsFixing fittings in shower cubicles (no tile drilling)If you use it on wood joints, the wood will break before the adhesive, and of course, totally waterproof.

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  • pgs070947 commented on AroundHome's instructable Three Clamps Racks From Scraps1 year ago
    Three Clamps Racks From Scraps

    Lovetra, you would have a field day here and get very, very rich at the same time. My problem is having about a hundred projects on the go all the time and every one is important. The goal is always to plan, get materials, start, and then move onto the next project - that's the problem. Never quite finish the one before. Having worked my way through the whole house, kitchen, bathroom, loft, shed, garden, the whole thing is a dog's dinner. Scattered amongst all this are the tools. Add to this, a hobby (electronics) that involves millions of minute components and you have the perfect storm. About half of my life has been spent looking for things. The air is permanently blue. I have three of everything because I have to go and buy another one.I have tried every trick in the book, but can n...

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    Lovetra, you would have a field day here and get very, very rich at the same time. My problem is having about a hundred projects on the go all the time and every one is important. The goal is always to plan, get materials, start, and then move onto the next project - that's the problem. Never quite finish the one before. Having worked my way through the whole house, kitchen, bathroom, loft, shed, garden, the whole thing is a dog's dinner. Scattered amongst all this are the tools. Add to this, a hobby (electronics) that involves millions of minute components and you have the perfect storm. About half of my life has been spent looking for things. The air is permanently blue. I have three of everything because I have to go and buy another one.I have tried every trick in the book, but can never break the habit. Extend this to keys, credit cards, very important documents etc.If I could afford it, I would put a GPS tracker on everything, but then I would lose the phone. Everyone including lady friend is banned from entering. What I really need is a big shed with bedroom etc. attached. Why do I put myself through all this? Because I come from a long line of grafters and doers who could never afford to get someone in to do it - it's in the genes. It’s the difference between the Brits and USA. Here in the UK, whole new generations have never experienced a hardship like WW2. Get someone in, get the groceries delivered, get it online. If someone put me in a small, neat, tidy one bedroom flat, I would dieGood luck to you and keep on DOING

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  • pgs070947 commented on AroundHome's instructable Three Clamps Racks From Scraps1 year ago
    Three Clamps Racks From Scraps

    Many variations on this possible - slots for files and chisels, narrow slots for stripping knives, holes of all sizes for screwdrivers etc. etc.If only I could remember to put them back after use

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  • pgs070947 commented on ee_eng's instructable Make a Good Dupont Pin-Crimp EVERY TIME!1 year ago
    Make a Good Dupont Pin-Crimp EVERY TIME!

    If it's a genuine SN-28B crimper, you will need a small mortgage to buy one.Really suspiciously cheap crimpers aren't worth buying, but there are some decent mid-quality crimpers that work really well.I bought one of these for the smaller Molex 0.1" pitch friction lock female headers and can't fault it. Japanese, decent quality with a choice of crimp sizes.https://www.amazon.co.uk/Universal-Micro-Crimping-Crimppins-Engineer/dp/B002AVVO7K/ref=pd_lpo_vtph_147_tr_t_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=75A3K44F74HE2NVC6WKYI don't know how these connector companies can justify charging 3-figure sums for a crimper, but if your firm is buying it, so what

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  • How to Make a Touch Switch Using One Mosfet

    Have to agree with Joe Strout, but nice demo all the same.You can do pretty much the the same with a BJT or a CMOS gate (CMOS gate would be better with very high input impedance)A "true" one finger touch switch relies on capacitance or induced mains hum.I think some of the Atmel MCUs have a touch facility

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  • pgs070947 commented on Im_int's instructable IoT Water Alarm1 year ago
    IoT Water Alarm

    I like itWater leaks can do a huge amount of damage and sometimes the first indication you get is the ominous dark stain on the ceiling. If it happens while you're away for a few weeks, your ceiling can be on the floor when you get backThere are plenty of out of the way places for water leaks to go undetected and a few of these dotted around can save you a fortune in repair bills. Sometimes water damage can be worse than fire.For sensors, I add some compressed foam, the sort you get as soldering iron replacement pads as they swell up when wet. The probes can sit on the foam, weighted down. If it's something like a rough concrete floor, the foam will take up any unevenness and just a small part needs to get damp to sense.You could extend it to turn off the water with a solenoid valve on ...

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    I like itWater leaks can do a huge amount of damage and sometimes the first indication you get is the ominous dark stain on the ceiling. If it happens while you're away for a few weeks, your ceiling can be on the floor when you get backThere are plenty of out of the way places for water leaks to go undetected and a few of these dotted around can save you a fortune in repair bills. Sometimes water damage can be worse than fire.For sensors, I add some compressed foam, the sort you get as soldering iron replacement pads as they swell up when wet. The probes can sit on the foam, weighted down. If it's something like a rough concrete floor, the foam will take up any unevenness and just a small part needs to get damp to sense.You could extend it to turn off the water with a solenoid valve on the main incomer, but if you have a tank in the loft, this could still do a lot of damage.

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  • Makin' Bacon - a Guide to Cold Smoking Bacon

    One rinse or soak might reduce the nitrates by say 75%. A second rinse will reduce the remaining 25% by another 75% - this is called serial dilution - a bit like homeopathy. On the plus side, sodium nitrate, indeed all nitrates and all sodium salts are soluble so will dissolve out.Looking at the Chorizo packet I see the preservative is not sodium nitrate, but sodium nitrite which is chemically much more reactive. Nitrates do not react much at all, but nitrites will react with stomach acid to produce nitrous acid, bacterial action then goes on to potentially produce things like nitrosamines.What I would suggest is a sodium chloride (table salt) as the moisture remover, and small amount of sodium nitrite as the perseverative. This would reduce the overwhelming nitrate content. At least th...

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    One rinse or soak might reduce the nitrates by say 75%. A second rinse will reduce the remaining 25% by another 75% - this is called serial dilution - a bit like homeopathy. On the plus side, sodium nitrate, indeed all nitrates and all sodium salts are soluble so will dissolve out.Looking at the Chorizo packet I see the preservative is not sodium nitrate, but sodium nitrite which is chemically much more reactive. Nitrates do not react much at all, but nitrites will react with stomach acid to produce nitrous acid, bacterial action then goes on to potentially produce things like nitrosamines.What I would suggest is a sodium chloride (table salt) as the moisture remover, and small amount of sodium nitrite as the perseverative. This would reduce the overwhelming nitrate content. At least then you would not run the nitrate risk and only have to assess the sodium risk. If I had to place a bet, I would chance the sodium way ahead of the nitrate risk.You take this advice at your own risk, but in general terms, I would avoid sodium nitrate. I certainly would not want to consume bacon cured with it.As for smoking (bacon), that's another issue, but all these methods were in place years ago, like smoked fish (kippers) and salted cod. But that was in a time when food had to last throughout winter and a long time before fridges and freezers.

    Just an bit more information from an area that I had quite a lot of experience in.Nitrates and nitrites are just a couple of items in a long list of items like pesticides and heavy metals that are monitored regularly in drinking water as part of the EU directive on drinking water quality.Both have limits for drinking water at the parts per million (ppm) or milligrams per litre level and nitrate levels were a concern back in the 70's.The main concern was the potential carcinoma evidence, plus the known "blue baby" syndrome, where nitrates and nitrites affect the red blood cells.Sodium nitrate and possibly nitrite have been used in products like Spam (spiced ham) etc. for years.The water companies have an obligation to reduce harmful materials in water, both chemical and bacteri...

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    Just an bit more information from an area that I had quite a lot of experience in.Nitrates and nitrites are just a couple of items in a long list of items like pesticides and heavy metals that are monitored regularly in drinking water as part of the EU directive on drinking water quality.Both have limits for drinking water at the parts per million (ppm) or milligrams per litre level and nitrate levels were a concern back in the 70's.The main concern was the potential carcinoma evidence, plus the known "blue baby" syndrome, where nitrates and nitrites affect the red blood cells.Sodium nitrate and possibly nitrite have been used in products like Spam (spiced ham) etc. for years.The water companies have an obligation to reduce harmful materials in water, both chemical and bacteriological, but the rules for foodstuffs might be different. There is pressure for consumers to limit their intake of so-called processed meats.Like all things, it's moderation that counts and I still like Chorizo. It's a risk choice like smoking.All I could advise is to look at salt (sodium chloride) as an alternative, but the key bit would be to rinse with tap water, not once, but several times .Methods that used to be acceptacble change as evidence stacks up.It's not so long ago that mercury salts, BHC and DDT pesticides were in regular use in gardens.

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  • Makin' Bacon - a Guide to Cold Smoking Bacon

    This worries me.When I see sodium and nitrate in the same breath, I think of the health implications.Yes, I know Sodium Nitrate is used commercially in pork products, but sodium is implicated in hypertension and nitrates in stomach cancers - nitrates, nitrites, nitrosamines - it's something to avoid.I know you say you rinse it, but that would not convince me. Your heart is in the right place, but adding these known risk agents is not good practice.If the purpose is to take moisture out of the raw meat, there must be better ways.It's a long time since I consumed chemically cured bacon, or salmon etc.

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  • pgs070947 commented on lingib's instructable CoreXY CNC Plotter1 year ago
    CoreXY CNC Plotter

    I'll second all the praise.A lot of effort has to go into the planning, doing and the presentation.Just looking for some spare time to have a crack at something like this

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  • pgs070947 commented on CrtSuznik's instructable Attiny Programmer (using Arduino UNO)1 year ago
    Attiny Programmer (using Arduino UNO)

    Have a look at Hightech Lowtech (MIT tutorial) for some basic stuff nicely explained and also Nick Gammon's site (gammon.au) where he goes into some depth on Atmel programming and some useful articles on sleeping and pinchange interrupts using the ATtiny85.When you order some, be aware of the two versions in DIP-8 packages. One has a wider supply range and the other operates up to 20-MHz.A useful little chip for timing projects and a lot more versatile than messing about with CMOS timers etc.

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  • Compact Regulated PSU - Power Supply Unit

    Still can't see the 3300uF cap.Important things like values need to be on the schematic or in the bill of materials.Not trying to be critical, but anything involving 230-V AC and extraneous metal (enclosure) needs to have a firm earth. I'm just worried that someone might copy as is and then gets a jolt. I appreciate that if you are using the original ATX enclosure, it will have a three pin IEC connector, but you need to stress that this earth is solidly connected to the case and ideally to the removable lid as well. A solid earth is the most important part of any equipment like this.

    You've lost me a bit on this.Why do you need the complication of two power inputs?I think I might have added a beefier capacitor on the input side to help smoothing. Check the voltage regulators data sheet to see if you need bypass caps on the ins and outs. It's good practice to have say, a 10uF and 0.1uF on both sides of the regulator for stability. Can't see any earthing either. Metal enclosures and 240-V AC needs care. Unless it's double insulated (Class 2?) it should have an earth on it.Otherwise, good use of the ATX enclosure

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  • Building a Reclaimed Wood Door From Scratch (Mission Style)

    Surprising just how much the stability of a door with panel construction relies on the tightness of the panels.I have seen several doors drop on the lock side just from the weight of the timber that pulls the joints apart. Agree about wooden panels expanding. I don't think I would want a heavy external door of panel construction, unless there was a tight-fitting glass panel as well.On the construction side, avoid large mortice locks in the joints and having made some doors myself with a portable router only, double strings of biscuits (6 per joint) work well.

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  • Fix Broken Plastic! Never Throw It Away Any More!

    As you probably know, some plastics are more difficult than others to repair. The thermoplastics like PE and PP won't stick (though Loctite do an expensive olefin primer that alledgedly works with PTFE as well), but they weld well if you get the temperature right.A quick fix in emergencies is to get a strip of PE or PP, set light to it, and let it drip onto the crack. - not guaranteed to work, but might stem the flow if its a tank.I had a large PP outdoors water tank that developed a leak at the bottom. It was going to be expensive to repair. I tried welding but the water pressure found the holes and welding on the inside was impossible.The final repair wasn't pretty but it woprks. I used Geocel/Dow Corning "The Works". It is a silicone-like adhesive that will cure under water...

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    As you probably know, some plastics are more difficult than others to repair. The thermoplastics like PE and PP won't stick (though Loctite do an expensive olefin primer that alledgedly works with PTFE as well), but they weld well if you get the temperature right.A quick fix in emergencies is to get a strip of PE or PP, set light to it, and let it drip onto the crack. - not guaranteed to work, but might stem the flow if its a tank.I had a large PP outdoors water tank that developed a leak at the bottom. It was going to be expensive to repair. I tried welding but the water pressure found the holes and welding on the inside was impossible.The final repair wasn't pretty but it woprks. I used Geocel/Dow Corning "The Works". It is a silicone-like adhesive that will cure under water. It is also very sticky. I spatula'd the adhesive over the crack then worked in some car body repair coarse glass fibre. Then another layer of adhesive, plus fibre and finally a top coat. Despite the pressure from the full water, it has held for over a year and at least £500 saved for an outlay of less than £10

    Steady on plasteek.PVC is one of the most useful of all the plastics. The clue is in the name. Poly Vinyl Chloride. Yes, it has a lot of chlorine, so don't burn it. Hydrogen Chloride is the end result and a lot of carbon.It is one of the most versatile engineering plastics, easy to engineer, long lasting if used wisely. Widely used in construction materials, windows, doors, pipelines, domestic plumbing etc. Life as we know it now would be difficult without PVC. Much medical equipment like disposable tubing systems are PVC. Almost all consumer electrical wiring cables are PVC insulated.If you weld it, which I have, temperature control is the key parameter. If you are getting any fumes, you are over-heating. A proper weld with a heat gun like a Leister is a safe, fume-free operation.PVC i...

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    Steady on plasteek.PVC is one of the most useful of all the plastics. The clue is in the name. Poly Vinyl Chloride. Yes, it has a lot of chlorine, so don't burn it. Hydrogen Chloride is the end result and a lot of carbon.It is one of the most versatile engineering plastics, easy to engineer, long lasting if used wisely. Widely used in construction materials, windows, doors, pipelines, domestic plumbing etc. Life as we know it now would be difficult without PVC. Much medical equipment like disposable tubing systems are PVC. Almost all consumer electrical wiring cables are PVC insulated.If you weld it, which I have, temperature control is the key parameter. If you are getting any fumes, you are over-heating. A proper weld with a heat gun like a Leister is a safe, fume-free operation.PVC is also a very accommodating plastic when it comes to gluing. Super Glues, epoxies, solvent welding are all good techniques.At the end of the day, it's up to you to make sure you are doing the job correctly, risk assess before you start and so on.

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  • pgs070947 commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Unusual Uses for WD-401 year ago
    Unusual Uses for WD-40

    If I had just one solvent/protective spray to use, it would be WD40.Professionally, I tried all the "look-alikes", but WD40 beat the lot.One of it's great advantages is that it won't attack/soften plastics like some of the others.Someone might have already mentioned it, but WD40 reputadley got it's name from Water Dispersant formula number 40.The only other use I could add to your list is water-proofing and cleaning leather shoes like safety shoes. I've also occasionaly used it to water-proof brick walls and timber.I buy the stuff by the 5-litre drum and use a cheap sprayer (old cleaning spray etc. ) as this is the cheapest way. You get a free sprayer with every 5-litres, but the new ones are rubbish.Great stuff and a great aftershave

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  • pgs070947 commented on scoochmaroo's instructable 15 Unusual Uses for Cheap Vodka1 year ago
    15 Unusual Uses for Cheap Vodka

    No. It isn't half the proof figure.Proof spirit was originally tested by pouring a small amount of the suspect liquid onto a small pile of gunpowder. If you could ignite the gunpowder, then the liquid had passed "proof" i.e. too much water, then the powder wouldn't ignite (it would eventually as the gunpowder dried out) - so 100% proof met that standard.Off the top of my head, 70% proof vodka is near enough 40% ABV - Alcohol By Volume). I must admit I didn't do all the sums. So 100% ABV would be 100x70/40 proof or thereabouts.Proof was used before more scientific methods like gas liquid chromatography came along.The UK proof figures are all I'm familiar with, but other countries might use different systems. People understand proof, but ABV is harder for many.Going back to the ...

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    No. It isn't half the proof figure.Proof spirit was originally tested by pouring a small amount of the suspect liquid onto a small pile of gunpowder. If you could ignite the gunpowder, then the liquid had passed "proof" i.e. too much water, then the powder wouldn't ignite (it would eventually as the gunpowder dried out) - so 100% proof met that standard.Off the top of my head, 70% proof vodka is near enough 40% ABV - Alcohol By Volume). I must admit I didn't do all the sums. So 100% ABV would be 100x70/40 proof or thereabouts.Proof was used before more scientific methods like gas liquid chromatography came along.The UK proof figures are all I'm familiar with, but other countries might use different systems. People understand proof, but ABV is harder for many.Going back to the misuse of chemicals, there is another (today) reported acid attack in UK. Acid is becoming the weapon of choice. Soon, all the useful household or building chemicals will be outlawed, spoiling it for the legitimate users (descaling pipework, cleaning off mortar residues) to stop a small minority. Local authorities and the EU have a field day banning things like effective pesticides.When I pour A voddie tonight, I'll have a look at the label

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  • pgs070947 commented on scoochmaroo's instructable 15 Unusual Uses for Cheap Vodka1 year ago
    15 Unusual Uses for Cheap Vodka

    As the use of what used to be common household chemicals become harder to obtain legitimately (won't name them) thanks to terrorist activity (Hydrochloric acid named in the press, left on a UK motorway recently), then you have to turn to other sources.The price of meths and especially industrial meths with duty added is nudging towards the price of basic vodka, then vodka might be your cleaner of choice.I have a bottle of absolute alcohol here (99.9% ethanol or 175 degrees proof) which only ever gets used for skin cleaning prior to blood glucose finger pricking.

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  • pgs070947 commented on DiyCoolStuff's instructable Restoring an Old Wrench1 year ago
    Restoring an Old Wrench

    Absolutely agree. I have a collection of my father's joinery tools, including some lovely cast steel chisels with box handles and all brass fittings. They are a pleasure to use (hard to sharpen) and should never end up in the bin. I will never wear them out, so you are just the custodian.Rusty tools say a lot about the care they have had. They still work, but I doubt that it would go down well in an engineering shop. It takes seconds to wipe over with WD40 or Waxoyl, but takes a lot longer to restore.If I have to get rust off, it's usually phosphoric acid and as mentioned before, Scotchbrite (3M) non-woven abrasive pads. No place for sandpaper.Good tools are still available from new and for adjustable wrenches, I rate Bacho tools. Britool, Elora and Bedford still do high quality spanner...

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    Absolutely agree. I have a collection of my father's joinery tools, including some lovely cast steel chisels with box handles and all brass fittings. They are a pleasure to use (hard to sharpen) and should never end up in the bin. I will never wear them out, so you are just the custodian.Rusty tools say a lot about the care they have had. They still work, but I doubt that it would go down well in an engineering shop. It takes seconds to wipe over with WD40 or Waxoyl, but takes a lot longer to restore.If I have to get rust off, it's usually phosphoric acid and as mentioned before, Scotchbrite (3M) non-woven abrasive pads. No place for sandpaper.Good tools are still available from new and for adjustable wrenches, I rate Bacho tools. Britool, Elora and Bedford still do high quality spanners and sockets.

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  • pgs070947 commented on SpecificLove's instructable DIY Water Misting System1 year ago
    DIY Water Misting System

    Where I live in a water stressed area, the water company would take a dim view of using what I presume is potable water for keeping cool.Using drinking water for non-essential uses like sprinkling lawns etc. would immediately attract the compulsory fttting of a water meter.If it's so hot where you are, there must be water shortages, so waste it like that?

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  • Cheap Scalable Arduino CNC (Plotter, Mill, 3D Printer...)

    Regardless of the authorship etc., it's stillnice to see a well presented project like this which brings attention to all the others who contributed.I probably wouldn't have seen it otherwise. It's a great bit of engineering and inspiration whatever.

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  • pgs070947 commented on a-morpheus's instructable Undead Pan1 year ago
    Undead Pan

    Only if you don't rinse or neutralise. Caustic soda is an effective way to restore steel or cast iron cookware from really baked on residues. As sodium hydroxide is totally water soluble, it will wash out easily if pores exist. Failing that, just stew up some rhubarb for the first meal.

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  • pgs070947 commented on karlli's instructable Ultrasound Tank Level Meter1 year ago
    Ultrasound Tank Level Meter

    Yours is a tricky one given the medium. If you can get a look at textbook Practical Arduino, it gives details of a project using a pressure sensor. One of the main problems is diffusion in or out of the connecting tubing pipework. Given that yours sounds like a commercial set-up, you could look at stainless or copper tubing. The thing that would worry me is the effect of oil vapours, and not least, any flammability issues. If you kept the measuring stuff outside the tanks, you could mitigate that. A well engineered dip tube from the top for pressure might work or there is the tried and tested float and pulley method.

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  • Arduino & Android Based Bluetooth Control Password Protected Door Lock (Version 2)

    A lot of effort gone into this.I've long thought that if cars can have central locking, why not houses?I like the rack bolt and I wonder if for a beefier version you could use a commercial mortice rack bolt.I haven't read all of it, but do you get feedback to confirm that the bolt has gone over?. Some special facility rooms like sterile rooms with UV lamps used to have a microswitch in the frame side to confirm that the bolt had actually gone over.

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  • pgs070947 commented on karlli's instructable Ultrasound Tank Level Meter1 year ago
    Ultrasound Tank Level Meter

    Bluetooth doesn't have a great range.You have a choice of AM/FM radios (depending on country) operating on 433 or 868 MHz if you wanted to go wireless. 433 has the greatest penetration.I quite like ZigBee (Digi XBee for example) which are relatively easy to set up and can cope with analogue and digital inputs.Six might be too many for analogue, digital no problem. You might be able to poll each tank.Oil is a messy medium for any contact method. Do you have sight glasses?Domestic oil tanks have remote contents devices, but I don't know what the transmission medium is.One slight concern might be the effect of volatiles from the oil.

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  • pgs070947 commented on Donald Bell's instructable Make Beautiful Solder Joints1 year ago
    Make Beautiful Solder Joints

    Acetone. A bit risky in my opinion. Too aggressive, too flammable, too much unpleasant vapour.Might be useful in a few circumstances, but not for routine use.The other problem is availability. UK hardware stores won't keep it, a specialist like a finishing supplier might do it, but as now you almost need a licence to buy solvent based glues, it might be better to stick to IPA.

    Familiar with clenching nails, i.e. turning over, usually on the backside, but not heard of it for wiring.I'm probably already using it, but hadn't named it. A classic use is when attaching flying leads to a board. A flying lead, just through the hole with no support is soon going to come adrift and start to rotate and lead to some funny results.With flying leads, I push some excess stripped lead through the hole, trim it to leave a few millimetres sticking out. Turn it over 90-degrees and solder.Result is a much stronger, non-rotating flying lead.Just as an add-on, a good flux is key. Never rely on the cored flux alone, but now exclusively use a syringe of Chip Quik. Gooey, but good.

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  • pgs070947 commented on Joebarteam's instructable Computer Control Box1 year ago
  • pgs070947 commented on Tiobel's instructable GPS Speedometer1 year ago
    GPS Speedometer

    I like this and the use of the OLED display which I want to experiment with soon.I'm quite keen on using GPS to get an accurate time signal, rather than rely on MSF etc., which can be temperamental.

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  • pgs070947 commented on karlli's instructable Ultrasound Tank Level Meter1 year ago
    Ultrasound Tank Level Meter

    I used to use a lot of ultrasonic sensors in the waste water business - the nature of the medium meant that non-contact was the preferred method.Long-term ultrasonics are generally weather-proof and being designed for industrial set-ups, but have a hefty price tag.I used cheaper non-waterproof sensors, but weather-proofed them myself using PVC pipework as a shield which was fine as the sensors always pointed down.The biggest problem was unexpected - spiders loved them, maybe there was a little warmth there, but a thick web soon caused problems. I could have devised a method to evict them, but that would be mean, so regular cleaning was appropriate.I didn't find any problems with sidewall reflections, in fact the pipe seemed to concentrate the beam and extend the range. Nor was the dampn...

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    I used to use a lot of ultrasonic sensors in the waste water business - the nature of the medium meant that non-contact was the preferred method.Long-term ultrasonics are generally weather-proof and being designed for industrial set-ups, but have a hefty price tag.I used cheaper non-waterproof sensors, but weather-proofed them myself using PVC pipework as a shield which was fine as the sensors always pointed down.The biggest problem was unexpected - spiders loved them, maybe there was a little warmth there, but a thick web soon caused problems. I could have devised a method to evict them, but that would be mean, so regular cleaning was appropriate.I didn't find any problems with sidewall reflections, in fact the pipe seemed to concentrate the beam and extend the range. Nor was the dampness a problem, just avoid direct wetting.Nice, useful project.

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