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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier4 months ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    Hi Mokhtar,If you want some really good speakers, look for some old unrepairable mini or midi hifi system that some friend or relative wants to get rid of. Some of those old systems had really good speakers.As for the sound going off and light dimming, it looks like your power supply either doesn't have good regulation or doesn' have the current capacity to handle the power amp. If I remember correctly (please confirm with the Specs that I attached with my text) the minimum current requirement is 2A. If you are using 4 Ohm speakers, you will be running the amplifier at its maximum output at high volume so you will probably need a higher capacity power supply and better regulation.If your light is connected across the 12V power supply and it dims on high volume, it means that the supply ...

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    Hi Mokhtar,If you want some really good speakers, look for some old unrepairable mini or midi hifi system that some friend or relative wants to get rid of. Some of those old systems had really good speakers.As for the sound going off and light dimming, it looks like your power supply either doesn't have good regulation or doesn' have the current capacity to handle the power amp. If I remember correctly (please confirm with the Specs that I attached with my text) the minimum current requirement is 2A. If you are using 4 Ohm speakers, you will be running the amplifier at its maximum output at high volume so you will probably need a higher capacity power supply and better regulation.If your light is connected across the 12V power supply and it dims on high volume, it means that the supply voltage is dropping, which means that the power supply can't deliver the current required by the amplifier.

    Also thanks to the well designed amplifier module.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier4 months ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    Brilliant!! It looks great!

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier4 months ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    You can, but at higher volume, the IC will start getting hot. To avoid overheating it is best to have a heatsink when using 4 Ohm speakers. You will find more info in the specifications that I attached along with my text.The heatsink is actually quite small. Some suppliers sell the module with the heatsink attached. If you google images for PAM8610 you will come across some images of the module with the heatsink.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier4 months ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    Please also read my reply to another similar question. You can't connect a headphone to this amplifier. Headphones with the normal 3.5mm jack require that one of the speaker terminals of each of the amplifiers is connected to ground. In this amplifier module the speaker terminals are "floating". If you short the two negative terminals of the speaker output together to connect them to the common point of the headphone jack, you'll be lucky if nothing blows. I haven't come across any solution to this, besides having a separate headphone amplifier.

    You haven't provided enough information to help me better understand your circuit connection e.g.1. What is the output voltage of the battery? meaning are the cells connected in series or parallel?2. What is 3s?3. Do you have any power supply filtering?4. What is the current capacity of the power supply?A circuit diagram of your setup would be helpful.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier4 months ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    Unfortunately you can't connect normal headphones with a stereo jack to this amplifier module. The reason is that the four speaker terminals are "floating". This is a bridged output amplifier. There is no ground connection as in normal push pull class AB amplifiers. If you connect any one of the terminals to ground or connect the negative speaker terminals together you will short out some of the output components of the amplifier resulting in smoke!The purpose of the input capacitors is AC coupling, effectively DC blocking. This is also explained in these chats below.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier5 months ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    If you remove the filter capacitor and short its terminals, you are actually shorting the positive to the negative of the power supply. In other words you will have no sound and a possibly burnt power supply.According to the info I have read on this board, this capacitor smooths any ripple you have on the power supply thereby reducing the distortion caused by an unfiltered dc supply. Leave it in place.Your problem most likely lies with either your speakers or your music source. Make sure your speakers are mounted in properly matched speaker enclosures and that your music source plays back without distortion on other amplifiers.I use this same board cnonnected to ex-music system speakers to amplify my PC audio and it sounds great.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier6 months ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    Hi. Sorry for the delay replying. I just saw this post.The connection from Bluetooth module to PAM8610 is pretty straightforward. You just need to connect L to L input, R to R input and GND to GND. The Bluetooth module itself can be powered from the 12V supply via a 5V regulator. To minimise the hum and also the heat generated by the power supply use a buck boost stepdown module (adjusted to output 5V) rather than a 5V regulator. They are very cheap and easily available from suppliers like AliExpress.Other recommended ways to reduce the hum in audio systems are:1. Keep all the wire connections short2. Bring all the ground connections to one point3. Make sure that the 12V supply to the power amp is properly filtered.4. Keep the preamp section of the amplifier and the Bluetooth module as ...

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    Hi. Sorry for the delay replying. I just saw this post.The connection from Bluetooth module to PAM8610 is pretty straightforward. You just need to connect L to L input, R to R input and GND to GND. The Bluetooth module itself can be powered from the 12V supply via a 5V regulator. To minimise the hum and also the heat generated by the power supply use a buck boost stepdown module (adjusted to output 5V) rather than a 5V regulator. They are very cheap and easily available from suppliers like AliExpress.Other recommended ways to reduce the hum in audio systems are:1. Keep all the wire connections short2. Bring all the ground connections to one point3. Make sure that the 12V supply to the power amp is properly filtered.4. Keep the preamp section of the amplifier and the Bluetooth module as far away as possible from the power supply. In this case using a wall wart helps.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier8 months ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    Hi. Thanks for ckecking out my instructable. What you are planning to do is an excllent way of using these modules.The two modules that you intend to use and the functions that you intend to use them for are also perfectly applicable.My suggestion is to use these modules as speaker drivers in the output stage. In the input stage you would then have an active crossover circuit. If you have the knowledge and skill, i recommend building up this stage using preamp ICs. When I was planning to make exactly what you are intending to do, I found many circuit diagrams on the internet, but they were mainly 2.1. If you are intending to make 4.1, you will have to look for an additional surround sound circuit.Please keep in mind that none of the speaker connections for all these modules should ever ...

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    Hi. Thanks for ckecking out my instructable. What you are planning to do is an excllent way of using these modules.The two modules that you intend to use and the functions that you intend to use them for are also perfectly applicable.My suggestion is to use these modules as speaker drivers in the output stage. In the input stage you would then have an active crossover circuit. If you have the knowledge and skill, i recommend building up this stage using preamp ICs. When I was planning to make exactly what you are intending to do, I found many circuit diagrams on the internet, but they were mainly 2.1. If you are intending to make 4.1, you will have to look for an additional surround sound circuit.Please keep in mind that none of the speaker connections for all these modules should ever be connected to the ground of your amplifier system. The speaker output for each channel of each module is connected as a bridge circuit and therefore both connections of each speaker terminal is live. If any of the speaker connections is connected to ground, one section of the bridge gets grounded and will most likely blow (never tried for obvious reasons!). You can also purchase ready assembled circuit boards, but these are relatively more expensive than the power amp modules that you have.Good luck

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier8 months ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    SMPS modules usually have built in over current protection and thermal shutdown to protect them from damage. If your sub-woofer suddenly draws a high current during a bass surge, the SMPS may shutdown.The other issue I mentioned previously is the thermal shutdown of the PAM8610. The heatsink will help.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier8 months ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    I did a quick Google search for a quick way to help you with your problem and I came across this website: https://www.easyandworkproject.xyz/2016/02/10-watts-8-ohms-class-d-amplifier-sound-test-review.htmlIn summary you need to do the following:1. Since you are using a 4 Ohm speaker, you need a heatsink for the IC. Basically, it gets overheated and activates thermal shutdown.2. You need more current from your power supply. 12V 3A is recommended in the above webpage, but my 2A supply works fine. To confim, check the supply voltage when you increase the volume. If it can't handle the current, the supply voltage will drop.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier9 months ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    Sorry I have no experience winding coils for crossover networks, but I have no doubt that you will find many amateur and professional audio websites if you Google the subject.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier10 months ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    One of the main problems you would have using the PAM8610 is that you would have to have an addiional 12V supply to run it. In this case you wouldn't be able to run your amplifier from your USB socket unless you used an additional voltage booster module (also available from AliExprss - based on IC XL6009). Then again your power source (e.g. USB socket) would have to provide enough current to power both the booster as well as the PAM8610.A better solution would be to use a 5V mono module. I did a search on AliExpress for "5V mono digital amplifier board" and came up with this 5W 5V mono amplifier based on the IC XTP8871 the price for 1 pc is around one USD. Please look it up. You may find other mono amplifers that you would prefer.You also have to consider using an active cross...

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    One of the main problems you would have using the PAM8610 is that you would have to have an addiional 12V supply to run it. In this case you wouldn't be able to run your amplifier from your USB socket unless you used an additional voltage booster module (also available from AliExprss - based on IC XL6009). Then again your power source (e.g. USB socket) would have to provide enough current to power both the booster as well as the PAM8610.A better solution would be to use a 5V mono module. I did a search on AliExpress for "5V mono digital amplifier board" and came up with this 5W 5V mono amplifier based on the IC XTP8871 the price for 1 pc is around one USD. Please look it up. You may find other mono amplifers that you would prefer.You also have to consider using an active crossover circuit with a subwoofer connection. In this case, you can't use the speaker terminals as the take-off point since the speakers are not connected to a common ground. You have to look for a circuit that has a preamp and uses your power modules as the final amplifier stage. Please google it. You will find a lot of circuits, believe me. I was planning to do exactly what you are doing and I am still deciding which circuit to use from the hundreds that I found!

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier10 months ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    Hi. Thanks for your interest in my instructable. I am not sure if you can brige the two amplifiers in this module into one amplifier to drive your subwoofer. The two speaker outputs are taken from already bridged amplifiers. Unless you have a tested circuit for bridging this module, I don't recommend it.A better option would be to purchase a higher wattage power module designed around the TPA3118 IC. A mono version is availavle from AliExpress for around USD 1.70. The rated power is max 60W, but the voltage range is 12V to 24V. You can run it at a lower voltage for a lower power output to suit your speaker. This is also a Class D amplifier, so the heat dissipation is very low and there is not much change in distortion level at a lower voltage. Please google the specs for ihe module to ...

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    Hi. Thanks for your interest in my instructable. I am not sure if you can brige the two amplifiers in this module into one amplifier to drive your subwoofer. The two speaker outputs are taken from already bridged amplifiers. Unless you have a tested circuit for bridging this module, I don't recommend it.A better option would be to purchase a higher wattage power module designed around the TPA3118 IC. A mono version is availavle from AliExpress for around USD 1.70. The rated power is max 60W, but the voltage range is 12V to 24V. You can run it at a lower voltage for a lower power output to suit your speaker. This is also a Class D amplifier, so the heat dissipation is very low and there is not much change in distortion level at a lower voltage. Please google the specs for ihe module to see if it suits your requirement. There are also other similar high power low cost mono modules available from AliExpress.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Portable Variable Voltage Power Supply1 year ago
    Portable Variable Voltage Power Supply

    Thank you Russ. I didn't think anyone would be looking at this three years later!

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier1 year ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    Thanks for the update. Just keep in mind that connecting directly to the module without capacitors may not work so well with all sources. Also, if you don't have an input volume control, you have to be sure that your source is at minimum volume when you plug it in, otherwise you get a blast of high volume as soon as you connect up.I had no problem with heating, but to be on the safe side, you can add on a small heatsink. You can check out the size of the heatsink if you do a search on AliExpress.com for PAM8610.

    According to the recommendations for this module, the power supply current rating should be at least 2 Amps. If you already have a 12V 500 mA power supply, you can use it for testing at low volume level, but for normal usage, 2 Amps is recommended.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier1 year ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    Hi. According to the specs for this module, the supply voltage range is 7V to 15V, so I'm not sure how it will operate at 5V. In any case, the maximum current available from the USB port is around 500mA. Too low to drive this module. I wouldn't risk damaging my USB ports by connecting two together, just for audio, when there are alternatives available.I'm referring to the module based on the PAM8403 ic. It is designed to be powered by the USB port. It delivers 3W per channel into 4 ohms spakers. There is a promotion currently on AliExpress - 10 pcs for approx USD 1.60.Regarding the capacitors, it is better to have them in, just in case your source is not capacitor coupled. As for the volume control, you may only eliminate it if your source has some means of output level control.

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  • tonep commented on abzza's instructable Tales From the Chip: LM386 Audio Amplifier1 year ago
    Tales From the Chip: LM386 Audio Amplifier

    Nicely done. Just the right amount of theory to get going with the practical. In case you are interested, I have a tiny little pcb for this IC amplifier (with no etching required) here: https://www.instructables.com/id/Compact-Circuit-Boards-with-Eagle-No-Etching/. It will take up to 470uF capacitor in the speker output quite confortably. For the 1000uF in your schematic, some adjustment may be needed.

    Just google "audio schematics" or "amplifier schematics" or "ic amplifier schematics". You will find enough stuff to keep you going for quite a while. In my experience, the more fun way is to learn by doing.

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  • Compact Circuit Boards With Eagle ... No Etching!

    Thanks very much. As you must already know, making a tutorial takes quite a bit of effort. A little appreciation goes a long way

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier1 year ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    Glad to be of help!

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier1 year ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    If you want to confim if the power supply is the actual cause of the distortion, try running your amplifier on a 12V battery e.g. car battery. Just take care that you have the polarity right. The extra diode I mentioned under "Troubleshooting" will help protect the module from inadvertent reverse polarity.If the distortion is considerably reduced when using the battery, then there may be a problem with your power supply filtering or regulation. In this case just post a schematic of your power supply, if you have it or a picture of the lable if it is a wallwart and I will see if there is anything you can do to improve it.If there is no change in the distortion on battery power, then the problem may be that the input drive level is too high. If you can't reduce the input level, ...

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    If you want to confim if the power supply is the actual cause of the distortion, try running your amplifier on a 12V battery e.g. car battery. Just take care that you have the polarity right. The extra diode I mentioned under "Troubleshooting" will help protect the module from inadvertent reverse polarity.If the distortion is considerably reduced when using the battery, then there may be a problem with your power supply filtering or regulation. In this case just post a schematic of your power supply, if you have it or a picture of the lable if it is a wallwart and I will see if there is anything you can do to improve it.If there is no change in the distortion on battery power, then the problem may be that the input drive level is too high. If you can't reduce the input level, try using a series resistor in each input. It will go between each input capacitor and the corresponding terminal on the input socket. Experiment with values between 10K and 47K to get the lowest distortion with the minimum loss in volume.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier1 year ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    Nice work! Don't worry too much about the speaker. According to the specs (attached in my instructable - the relevant extract is attached in my reply to adhith94 below), the amplifier can take speakers of 4 to 8 Ohms impedance. The lower the impedance the higher the output power. Output power is also controlled by the supply voltage, but according to the specs, the highest voltage the amplifier module can take is 16V DC.Your speaker wattage is also not an issue. 20W means that it is well within the output range of the amplifier. In other words, your speakers will not be damaged at max volume.Thanks for mentioning the decoupling capacitor. You will need one depending on how well your power supply is regulated and also the length of the connecting cable between power supply and amplifier.

    Hi Karan. There is nothing much really that can go wrong. For the basic circuit, there are just three connections for the input circuit, four connections for the output and two for the power supply. Please post a picture showing the wires from the amplifier board to (1) the speaker terminals, (2) the audio source (3) the power supply terminals. This will help me find out where you are going wrong.Also, I suggest reading and following the troubleshooting section in my instructable. I'm sure you will find it useful.

    Thanks craige!

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier1 year ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    For some reason I am unable to enlarge your image to check out the specs of your power adaptor, but if the rating is 11.5V and 1.6A DC, you should have no problem using it. Just be sure that when you are wiring the DC socket on the amplifier, you connect +ve and -ve wires with exactly the same polarity as shown on the label of your adaptor.

    The first thing you do is make sure you have the power supply polarity correct. If you got that wrong, then I'm not sure your amplifier module survived the reverse polarity. I never tried that!If you got the power supply polarity right and there is still no sound, disconnect all the connections from the module. Only connect two individual speakers to the speaker connections. Then connect the power supply. Now when you touch the the two inputs with your finger, you should get sound in one of your speakers, depending on whether you touched the left or right channel input.With this minimum connection, if your polarity is correct and you still get no sound when you touch the input terminals, then it is possible that the amplifier module is damaged, possibly by reversed power supply polarity...

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    The first thing you do is make sure you have the power supply polarity correct. If you got that wrong, then I'm not sure your amplifier module survived the reverse polarity. I never tried that!If you got the power supply polarity right and there is still no sound, disconnect all the connections from the module. Only connect two individual speakers to the speaker connections. Then connect the power supply. Now when you touch the the two inputs with your finger, you should get sound in one of your speakers, depending on whether you touched the left or right channel input.With this minimum connection, if your polarity is correct and you still get no sound when you touch the input terminals, then it is possible that the amplifier module is damaged, possibly by reversed power supply polarity or a short circuit while you were wiring up.Once you have the minimum connection working, you can proceed with making the remaining connections one by one, testing at each stage that the section you have completed is working.Good luck!

    According to the spec sheet that I have attached in my instructable, the amplifier module can take a supply voltage from 7V to 15V, so the 13V, which I am assuming is the measured voltage of your adaptor, should not be a problem.

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  • tonep made the instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier1 year ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    I haven't tried it, but according to the datasheet (page 4, attached here), the specs for Po show that with a 12V power supply, using 4 Ohm speakers, the PAM8610 is able to deliver 15W Continuous Output Power. It will therefore have no problem driving 10W speakers, but if you are using 4 Ohm speakers, a heatsink is essential.I use 6 Ohm speakers that came from an old mini-hifi system. I don't use a heatsink and I have no overheating problem.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier2 years ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    Since this is a Class D amplifier, it hardly produces any heat in operation. The reason is that the output transistors switch at a high speed from saturation to cutoff and never remain in the linear operating region as Class AB amplifiers do. I operate my unit at medium volume over long periods and there is hardly any heat generated.Please read the section on Power and Heat Dissipation in the specs for the PAM8610 linked above.Whether you decide on the module with the heatsink or not will depend on your usage. If you are going to be using your amplifier continuously at maximum volume at the higher end of the specs, I guess it would be best to go for the module with the heat sink.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier2 years ago
    Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier

    Hi Kasun. Thanks for your interest. Regarding your question about the power supply, one of the very basic requirements for reproducing sound accurately is ensuring that you are not introducing noise or external sounds to your original signal. A noisy, unfiltered power supply will do just this. If you look at any high quality hi-fi design project, you will find that as much attention is given to the power supply as to the main amp and pre-amp. It's easy to make a good filtered 12V power supply. All you need is a 12V transformer a bridge rectifier and a filter capacitor (2200 uF/25V - 2pcs in parallel for better filtering), or you could use one of the readily available switch mode power supplies, well filtered, small compact and light.As for the bass output for this little amplifier, you ...

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    Hi Kasun. Thanks for your interest. Regarding your question about the power supply, one of the very basic requirements for reproducing sound accurately is ensuring that you are not introducing noise or external sounds to your original signal. A noisy, unfiltered power supply will do just this. If you look at any high quality hi-fi design project, you will find that as much attention is given to the power supply as to the main amp and pre-amp. It's easy to make a good filtered 12V power supply. All you need is a 12V transformer a bridge rectifier and a filter capacitor (2200 uF/25V - 2pcs in parallel for better filtering), or you could use one of the readily available switch mode power supplies, well filtered, small compact and light.As for the bass output for this little amplifier, you will be surprised how much power it can output with medium sized speakers.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier2 years ago
    Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier

    Hi Greg. Sorry for the late reply. The two capacitors connect the two channels (stereo) of your source (e.g. MP3 player etc.) to the power amp. Another of their functions is blocking any DC appearing at the input.You can use a 12V DC wallwart. Just make sure it is capable of providing at least 1.5A current. 2A would be better. An old (discarded) 12V laptop power supply will be perfect. Just be sure to wire the DC jack polarity correctly.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier2 years ago
    Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier

    Thanks! I couldn't ask for a better explanation. This is what I love about electronics, no matter how many years you work at it, there's always something new to learn.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier2 years ago
    Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier

    Thanks jhsa and thanks for the tip. A mosfet will provide the best low voltage drop solution. In this case, the selected mosfet should be able to handle current required by amplifier module at maximum volume as well as the reverse 12V, if accidentally applied.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier2 years ago
    Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier

    Hi. Thanks.The two caps are not for the speaker output. They are for the audio input. They are connected to the PCB via the volume control. If you zoom in to the PCB you will see that they go to the connections R_IN and L_IN.

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