author
1Instructables3,103Views6CommentsBeautiful Sheridan, ColoradoJoined March 15th, 2016
Check out my websites: www.subclub.org (subminiature cameras) www.subclub.org/toko (Toko 4x5 cameras) www.subclub.org/fujinon (Fuji's large format lenses) www.subclub.org/minman (Minolta manual focus cameras) www.subclub.org/minchin (Chinese-made Minolta cameras)
  • Almost Free, Portable, Indoor, Home-made Evaporative (Swamp) Cooler

    You're right. If I bought a comparable cooler -- to the one I made -- it would be $500-$800. Mine cost me, maybe, $50.

    View Instructable »
  • Almost Free, Portable, Indoor, Home-made Evaporative (Swamp) Cooler

    My fan is a typical, 2x2 foot, window fan -- and is square, making it easy to work with. All the BIG BERTHA fans I've seen are round, and although a round fan can work, you will need to cut an appropriate-sized circle in a sheet of plywood (or whatever) to fit with your dripper system. I see no reason that it would not work well for a LARGE open area, such as a barn, but you need to be in an area with low humidity. A smaller extra fan -- at the other end of the room(s)/area -- really helps, I've discovered. Also, those large fans can be as strong as a tornado. You don't want it sucking the complete dripper system through its blades -- let alone wasting electricity, if you don't need to! So you may need to reinforce the dripper system mattes, and/or add a rheostat to the fan. Much...

    see more »

    My fan is a typical, 2x2 foot, window fan -- and is square, making it easy to work with. All the BIG BERTHA fans I've seen are round, and although a round fan can work, you will need to cut an appropriate-sized circle in a sheet of plywood (or whatever) to fit with your dripper system. I see no reason that it would not work well for a LARGE open area, such as a barn, but you need to be in an area with low humidity. A smaller extra fan -- at the other end of the room(s)/area -- really helps, I've discovered. Also, those large fans can be as strong as a tornado. You don't want it sucking the complete dripper system through its blades -- let alone wasting electricity, if you don't need to! So you may need to reinforce the dripper system mattes, and/or add a rheostat to the fan. Much of the time, I run my fan on LOW, and that's all I need. It's getting to be the end of Summer, so I'll be putting mine away again -- after TWO YEARS of great, ALMOST FREE, cooling. GOOD LUCK.

    View Instructable »
  • xkaes commented on jessyratfink's instructable How to Descale a Tea Kettle 2 years ago
    How to Descale a Tea Kettle

    White vinegar is just a 5%, dilute solution of acetic acid. So if you happen to have acetic acid -- and most REAL photographers do --and want a 5% solution, just take 0.5oz of acid and mix with 9.5oz of water (or 0.5ml acid and 9.5ml of water). If you want a 2.5% solution, as suggested in this INSTRUCTABLE, just take 0.25oz of acid and mix with 9.75oz of water (or 0.25ml acid and 9.25ml of water). You can mix larger or smaller quantities, of course, by varying the numbers. But remember, ALWAYS add the acid to the water, NOT the other way around!

    View Instructable »
  • Almost free, Portable, Indoor, Home-made Evaporative (Swamp) Cooler

    Today, when I was walking home from my early morning jog, I saw a Portable, Indoor, Factory-made Evaporative (Swamp) Cooler put out by someone's Denver City trash cans. The City didn't pick it up because it wasn't inside a trash can, but it was obvious that the owner was throwing it out. So I took it home. I figured it must be broken, but maybe I could fix it given my knowledge of evaporative coolers. A quick examination shows that, while it can stand a good cleaning, inside and out, the only operational problem is a disconnected electrical wire inside the case. So now I'll have to suffer through the summer with TWO evaporative coolers!

    View Instructable »
  • Almost free, Portable, Indoor, Home-made Evaporative (Swamp) Cooler

    It got up to 98 degrees here today (outside in the shade). Inside, it never got out of the 70's. Not bad for $15 -- and five gallons of water!

    View Instructable »
  • Almost free, Portable, Indoor, Home-made Evaporative (Swamp) Cooler

    Bruce is correct. That's why DRY are is stressed in the first diagram and on the first page. As mentioned on the last page, I have a small window open on each end of my house. Dry air is sucked in at one end by the fan, and the humid air is blown out the other end by the same fan. It works exactly the same way whether your cooler is inside a window, outside a window, or on the roof. You need to move the air through the house both to get dry air in and get humid air out.

    View Instructable »