CEILING FAN REPAIR

This could become an instructable, but these days, juggling photo files from cell phone to email to comp to ibles is so dang cumbersome..    anyway, this is how i fixed ceiling fan. fan has a rubber plate between motor and blades. apparently a bit of wiggle room for blades is a desirable thing. but that rubber plate was cracking. the fan blades had begun to hang low and drag against the light fixture below em. so i removed the lights that hang below fan. removed all 5blades,  blasted dust off rubber plate with compressed air, and used used gel superglue from loctite brand to glue cracks in rubber plate. i specifically got glue in a tube, not a bottle, since ihad to apply it upwards.  i never removed fan motor from ceiling, so, the work was overhead. the glue says its good for rubber, and so far, it has held up. the fan is reassembled, and working again.

Topic by Toga_Dan 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


how do you adjust a wobbling ceiling fan?

Ceiling fan wobbles at any speed

Question by 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago



What can I use an old Ceiling fan motor for?

Describe your question further, if needed.

Question by boosa 10 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


How can I balance a wobbly ceiling fan without the sticky weights that come with it?

I do not have the balancing kit that comes with new fans, and I don't want to glue washers to the back of the blades. Is there a better way to balance a ceiling fan without a kit?

Question by ivyplant 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Controlling the speed of the ceiling fan?

I have a standard ceiling fan of which the speed can be controlled by pulling the cord. As the slowest of the three speeds is still to fast, I would like somehow to be able to lower the speed. Is there any way of doing this? The fan operates at 220V

Question by nightlife31 9 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


ceiling fan wind turbine

I am in the middle of building a ceiling fan generator/wind turbine.  I know that the electric current produced is AC (I think it's 3 phase...it has 3 wires coming out of the fan). I do not know electricity that well, and am learning as I go... I would like to use the wind turbine to drive a small garden water fountain pump that is 120 volts.  What do I need electrically to complete building this wind turbine? Does anybody have any suggestions on resources on how to connect such a device electrically?  (Do i need a diode, rectifier, ???)  Does the voltage produced by spinning the generator have to equal the volts required by the device ( small water pump)?  Thank you for any and all help as I'm trying to learn and hopefully complete this wind turbine by summer.

Topic by Jesusistheway 4 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Twin blade ceiling fan

Hello, I fell in love with the twin-blade ceiling fan pictured at the link below (for some reason the uploader doesn't work in either form for me) , but at over $800 I hate the price tag.  I would like to try and DIY something like this for my new house, but I do not have the electrical knowledge to do it alone.  I figure that if I can find two second-hand desk fans and wire them into a nice light fixture I could get the look I want without the price, but I need to know how to do so safely.  I wouldn't want an electrical fire to burn down my new home! http://www.wayfair.com/Minka-Aire-Twin-Gyro-6-Blade-Turbofan-F502-BCW-MKA1488.html If anyone knows how to get these things all wired right it would be a great help! Joelle

Topic by Cleo420 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Ceiling Fan for a Theatrical Production?

My theater group is doing Guys and Dolls for our spring production, and our director wants to have ceiling fans in a few of the scenes. Is there any way to create prop fans that can hang from a fly rail and rotate, but without being electrically powered? Thanks in advance!

Question by earningmyimaginears 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


What can I make with the blades from an old ceiling fan??

Took a ceiling fan apart, and want to recycle the blades into something. Any ideas?

Question by K-Sue 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago



Ceiling fan control switch help Answered

I have a soldering fume extractor that is running off of 110v, and I wanted to attach a potentiometer to it so I can control the speed in the form of a ceiling fan control switch. Can someone please help me out on how to wire in a variable speed fan switch that has 3 wires coming from it?

Question by Electronics Man 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


How can one improve a ceiling fan creativily?And it should at the same time work as a fan.

Ceiling fan

Question by 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Ideas to recycle/upcycle ceiling fan?

I have a ceiling fan/light in good shape (had to be removed to accommodate a loft bed) and would like to recycle its parts. A search turned up little (wall art and an umbrella stand, not much more). Any ideas?

Topic by badrescher 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Running a ceiling fan from a battery?

I'm trying to build a large World War II bomb prop that needs to vibrate, for a short film I'm working on.  The building the bomb part I have figured out, but as far as the vibrating I'm trying to power a ceiling fan from some form of standard 'off-the-shelf' battery and have no idea how to start and if this is possible.  Anyone have any ideas about how to do this?

Question by superfad 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Ceiling fan generator mod to the max

I stubled upon several mods to convert a standard ceiling fan into a more or less usefull generator.So if you are looking to go this route then I might have some nice improvements that can be implemented.People like these mods for some weird reason, despite the fact that it requires quite a bit of extra work to make them weather proof.However, when it comes to the fundamentals then to me it looks like some folks out there are missing out.On the available power that is...Always the first step for a mod like this is to replace the induction ring with a lot of magnets.Second step usually is to remove a lot of the coils, especially the inner ring.Now, these two stator designs are common for fans with two speeds.Those with three or even reverse might have a different configuration!Lets start on the magnet part:The recommended way of placing the magnets is by creating an air gap as small as possible - makes sense.But then it is always the same amount of magnets as there is coils - and the spacing is also the same as for the coils.In the general generaotr design world this configuration is prefered as it allows for the best performance.If you dare to go a bit further and cosider how the magnets react to the stator configuration then you might want to consider a different option.You see, these two sets of coils for two different speeds mean just one thing:A different amount of poles is created, with the outer ring having more poles than the inner ring of coils.The core is split around the coils, not just to allow the windings to be made but also to provide independent paths for the magnetic field - resulting in the two pole configurations.Amounts differ by diameter, power level, manufacturer and so on.What is always the same is that the inner ring has less coils and that the outer segments of the poles created have even spacings.In the normal mods you see posted these gaps in the core for the outer ring are closed by inserting lamitaed pieces from some old transformer.And you end up with ONE usable coil configuration and ONE power output.The slightly advanced mod uses the inner coil to add some load depending on the speed to prevent spinning out of control in high winds.If you try a normal DC motor with permanent magnets than you will notice the strong binding forces, it is like the rotor sticks in certain places.The better ones use and uneven configuration to reduce this binding effect ;)In my mod the magnets are selected in size to almost be the same length as two stator poles next to each other.This allows for the best induction while still allowing "to experiment".Bringing the magnets and the coils into play...As said an exact match of the number of magnets to either coil ring is not ideal.The prefered option is to go somewhere in between.For example:Outer ring has 18 coils then the inner ring will have 9 coils - exactly half.360° divided by 15 make a nice 24 degress per magnet.But with 12 magnets you get an even 30°, which is far easier to deal with.16 magnets at 22.5° is another option.So, what does that exactly do for us?The bad thing is we get slightly less performance if you only see the standard mod with one coil ring.The good thing we get far lower binding forces and through that the thing will even spin in very light winds.Adding both coil rings with a suitable rectifier however results in a pulsing output of two sine waves.With just the rectifier we get a ripple that is easier to deal with through a capacitor.The extra power available is in the range of about 40% and make more than up for the "reduced" amount of magnets.Going the extra mile once more ;)Having created a much fancier ceiling fan mod now you might wonder if there is not a way to get even more out of it.And there is.For example by utilising a gear system or belt to get a far higher rotational speed on the generator than what the blades would provide, prefably then with quite big blades too and an automatic break for high wind conditions.With the reduced binding forces the generator will be happy to spin at quite high speeds in low winds.Downside is that you will need to build a far more sturdy bearing housing.In return though you get more stability and durability.You can do the math yourself based on the number of poles per ring and magnets to get the output frequency based on the RPM's.Perfect would now be to use a switch mode power supply configuration to directly transform the provided output into a stable DC per ring.And yes, it is possible to use mechanical systems to provide a fixed output speed from the blades to the generator - but way to complex and lossy!Lets do some lame math with no regards to realities:If the original fan would spin at 100 RPM at full speed than we could say our generator should provide the mains voltage at about 100 RPM.Keep in mind we utilise both coil rings and not just the high speed one!Geared and with the blades spinning at 100 RPM we might get as much as 1000V from this little generator....And even with the lower amount of magnets we migh see frequencies above the 500Hz range.The good thing now is that normal iron core transformers can still operate at these frequencies.A bit lossy in the upper range but acceptable for the purpose.Put simple: A 10 or 20:1 transformer per coil ring would provide us with a far more suitable output voltage and much higher amps.If you made it to here than you certainly wonder about other magnet configurations.Checking the stator configuration you will by now realise why I selected the magnet lenght accordingly.The magnets "activate" one coil after the other.The spacing between them means there is always some overlap where the magnets only cover one half of the stator for a coil.This is ok because we don't really have to worry about the resulting messy output.Ideally though you would want to have a magnet activate both coils, the inner and the outer at the same time.What we did though was to make sure that at no time more than ONE magnet fully covers more than ONE coil!It is the best option to cover both coil sets while minimising binding effects and increasing the avialable output.To go the last step you would need to invest a lot of time re-winding all coils :(You don't want to do this unless you have the means and no friends and family that might miss you for a few days....I found a far simpler way to change the coil configuration, although it is not as good a re-winding.So let's go full scale shall we?Ceiling fan reconfiguration!If you take the usual 18 to 9 configuration than one thing jumps to mind reight away: 3-phase power!Cutting the wire that goes from coil to coil might not always be possible and if it is then you need to know how to handle it.Magnet wire can be hard to solder.Burning the coating off results in corroded copper that is even harder to solder.If you are lucky though than a reall hot soldering irong will be able to melt the coating.The flux from the solder will start to cover the wire from the cut and the solder will follow.If not then using some fine sandpaper and time is the other option to remove the coating...Ok, you seperated all coil and have two wire ends per coil?I hope you did not cut off the ones going out to the actual connections to the outside world ;)Properly solder each wire end and take your time to check it is really proper and not just a few spots.Mark or number the coils on the rings!For the inner ring we have 9 but need only 3, so we start at one connection to the outside world and check if this connection is on the outside or inside of the coil.For this example I assume you picked the one that goes to the outside of the coil.Connect the inside wire to the outside wire of coil number 3, assuming we start with 1 here ;)From the inside wire of 3 you go to outside of 6 and the inside is you first new output connection.Do the same with the remaining 6 coils and where needed add the required output wire.It really helps to have wires with three different colors here, one color per new coil set.Note which color corresponds to to the three coils used!!!The outer ring with 18 coils is sightly different here.You see, we want a "flowing" magnetic field that makes best use of the new coil configuration!We can not simply bridge them in any way we feel like without considering how this might affect the electrical side of things.As we now take the approach of a three phase system it makes sense to use a more suitable magnet configuration as well.So before go to the outer ring of coils lets have a look of the best option for the magnets first:The stator packs are evenly spaced in our example and will alow us to use 18 magnets.This provides the best performance with the downside of a higher binding effect, but we need this configuration to get the best possible output.As said at the start I selected magnets that are just shy of being the same length as the corresponding stator segments.In a "free" setup these magnets would now be quite hard to place in a makeshift ring.Even harder in the original casing.A 3D printer certainly helps but some common sense too ;)Wood is easy to work with and if you select the right stuff than making a suitable ring to hold your magnets and attach to the drive system metal parts is not too hard.Bar or brick type magnets can be quite easy be utilised on a wood setup :)The key is that you add Flux Capacitors - sorry couldn't help the reference to Marty....What I mean is to add some magnetic material between the north pole of one magnet and the south pole of the other.Lets say your magnets are 15mm long and have a spacing of 5mm.Then a little plate of 12mm would be next to perfect.This plate needs to connect the magnets on the backside, the side facing away from the coils.Use a dremel tool or what you have to first create slots for the metal strips or bars, then the same for the magnets.Glue in the metal first and once set add the magnet, making sure the always go north to south with their alignment.Ok, and what does this do for us?I hope you are not one of these persons who starts building while reading...What we created now is a shortcut for the magnetic forces.The field between the magnets is severly compromised in terms of being usable for the coils.We do get a much soother run though...I only did that to have some fun and check if you paid attention - sorry :(What we really want is an effect similar to what you see on a loadspeaker magnet that is still in its metal shielding.A ring magnet with one pole on the inside and one on the outside is used here.The shielding provides a path for the magnetic field that is not going through the speaker coil - hence the little air gap for the coil.If we do the same then our efficiency will be going up quite a bit.Take two identical steel parts, like some butter knifes, and prefarbly a force gauge.If you try to pull your magnet at a 90° angle from the blade you will get a certain reading for the required force to lift it off.Most people now think that this would be the max a magnet can hold.So take the other knife and place the magnet between them.If you pull the knife off with the gauge now the reading will be higher than what you get from just the magnet ;)Taking that to our model and keeping the field lines in mind we now know that we could even use slightly longer plates if our magnets happen to be a bit short :)Just place them right behind each magnet !Back to the outer ring of coils....With 18 magnets we get an even system for both coil rings.However we want to make sure that our output waves are syncronised and not at random order.We need to combine two coils to be back on a 9 coil configuration as on the inner ring.The other option is to provide two sets of outputs for outer ring, resulting in 3 3-phase outputs.Both have their pros and cons....But if you check the 18 magnet configuration ina ction over the coils it becomes clear that combining two coils the usual way is possible but also that our inner ring does not get a proper north south action from the magnets!Only the outer coil ring works properly!For the inner ring we never get only a north south combo, instead a lot of mixes.Did I mention to read first? ;)Of course we can only use 9 magnets in our configuration, but at least I did not traick you on their size....You see, we need to account for the fact that the coils are not just evenly spaced but also that all configurations in terms of coils to stator pack are doubles or halfs.Makes a lot more sense if you know how these asyncronous motors work :)With 9 magnets we actually get both inner and outer ring coils activated properly.Plus we now have the benefit that there are always twoouter coils in sync with each other.Means apart from the same way you wired the inner ring you make this addition to the outer ring:"One" outer coil is created by going from one coilinner connection to the outer connection of the second after this, skipping one coil.The resulting output is again just 3 phases but with double the output voltage.The key is to again take notes of how you connect and wire the coils - and the colors used for the output wires!Let me give you an example for the correct order:I we take the number 1 coil on the inner ring then coils number 1 and 18 would be next to it on the outer ring.You want to combine 1 and 3, 2 and 4, 5 and 7,....And you want the resulting three coil packs and wires colores to correspond to the inner coils in the same order!That is true for the always same way of combining coils from the inner to outer connection - or the other way around but never mixed!Ok, we have done the magnets and the coil configuration now properly, no jokes this time!With two simple 3-phase rectifiers we get two DC outputs that can be combined or used seperately.As we end up with roughly double the output voltage on one output but all coils are the same it makes sense to treat them independly.For those who wonder why:If you add a load than one coil system would take a higher loading of it.Meaning while one coil set is stll fine the other will already start to overheat - if the load is too great.So we use two rectifiers with some filtering.In the basic form just a really big electrolytic capacitor of suitable voltage or a full LC filer system with multiple stages.Either way we can now utilise some better DC-DC converters to get going.Considering the equal max watss the coil rings can handle it make sense to include some current limiting.A good converter will provide this option.Both converters can now set to the desiered output or with some added protection diodes and adjusted properly to the same voltage combined for just one DC output.Compared to the standard mod of removing coils and bridgning stator packs the resulting output power in overall Watt will now be about 40-60% higher - depending on the model and quality of parts.Special words of wisdom:Consider the orignal max speed of the fan when used as intendet - see this as a theoretical max output that equals your mains voltage.Just ignore losses and such things - better to be safe than sorry.It becomes clear that it quite possible that your output will be far higher than mains voltage and that you need use transformers for the two 3-phase systems so you can use standard DC-DC converters, which have a max input voltage of around 50V only.This means your converter must be able to handle the higher amps!The fan might have only used 100W or less than 500mA but at high speeds and a ratios of lets say 10 to 1 for the gearing high wind speeds might get it up to over 5 amps on the transformer outputs.Please do the math first for your gear system in relation to the max wind speeds you want to use with your blades!If in doubt use a converter that has some reserves to offer, especially if you aim to charge batteries as quickly as possible.The most vital part however is to ensure that all previously cut wires are isulated properly!!!Magnet wire of the standard kind is good for about 1000V max, so don't drive it higher!Heat shrink with a hot glue liner is prefered but hard to apply in these thight spaces.Since nothing moves consider using long enough wires for your connections so you have enough space to solder without affecting the heat shrink tubes.Liquid insulation or rubber is the last option and should only be used to finalside the heat shrink security measures.Best option once all is confirmed to be working fine would be to make a custom mold and to fully enclose the staotr pack and wires with casting resin or an insulating casting mix.Make sure to keep the output wirese free at the their ends ;)What if I don't want to build a complicated three phase rectifier and just use a single phase system as it was?Firstly chances are your coils are already connected in a three phase configuration, just all in series.But working out a suitable magnet configuration to suit this is much harder if you want to use both sets of coils.In a series configuration like the original you also have to accept the losses from these connected coils.The higher the overall resistance the lower the possible output ;)Main problem however is to get the magnet working properly.The standard 9 or here even 18 magnet configurations still works, especially with the added shielding from behind.But the coils also produce a magnetic field, which grows with the load.Means that an top of all you also have the coils working against the magnets and create even higher losses.Explains why the simple folks prefer not use the inner coil set if they go with a single phase system.So either accept the losses and just use the outer coils or do it fully and get far mor output.And by the way: a 3-phase rectifier modlue is only a few cents more than a standard bridge rectifier ;)Ok, and why do I bother to write all this?People like to tinker but most don't really invent.Following some simple instructions is easy, trying to work it yourself much harder.The reward however is that you actually start to know what you are doing :)And what works for a ceiling fan can be used for these ring style washing machine motors too ;)Anyways...We need to get back our roots.Start thinking for ourself again, work things out instead of just looking them up.If people would be aware that a simple ceiling fan could provide about 3 times the output power of its rated installation value instead of only just about half......Super strong magnets allow real output even without re.winding all coils.And what works here works for other things too.We only learned to use magnets in a striaght way because we can not bend them.But we can bed the magnetic field lines to our advantage!The simple shielding used in this mod is nothing more than a shortcut to enhance the field strenght where it is is needed.By a simple coil modification we basically bet two electrical generators for the price and size of one.Apart from stating how easy it would be to place multiple stators and magnet rings into one generator the magnets itself also allow for even more output.If you ever played with hook magnets or speaker magnets then you know how much stronger they are compared to just the magnet once they seperate after hours of fun for you.Imagine you would replace the single bar magnet with two block magnets that are joined by a magnetic shunt like out simple shielding before.If the magnet blocks now would have a slightly smaller footprint than your individual poles:Imagine you create a hlaf ring shaped magnetic connection between the two blocks that also goes aruond the outer perimeter up to the outside of the magnets surface?I mean the surface facing the stator poles?Damn your imagination is good, yout it right away!Of course we would then have a magnet that allpies its full strength focussed onto each pole of a coil!And of course the resulting field would be far stronger than just using the magnet blocks itself and still significantly higher than just adding a shielding or connection between them.The affect of the next coil coming is also drastically reduced, which in return also increases the efficiency.In terms of numbers:If a fixed neodymium magnet would provide us 100$ field strength as the base point with no shielding (just the magnet blocks alone);A fully shielded and connected system, like in a hook magnet combined with a U-style magnet, would reach above 400% here.....Adding witchcraft to the mix ;)Although I know better I just assume some of you have now a working double-three-phase-ceiling-fan-generator.And that would mean you also have some fans to spare from your long experiments.Modern ignition coils seem to have nothing in common with our ceiling fan or resulting generator.So why do I try to use them anyway?For the ignition only one polarity is prefered so the spark works and travels as intendet.Means the "wasted" energy from the othe half of the pulse seems to be lost.The electronics do a lot here but magnets too ;)The core of the coil has magents at either end, turning it into one long magnet that still has the right properties to act as high voltage transformer system with the coils.The coil appear to be pre-loaded and with the ignition pulse it has to overcome the magnetic field pre-set by the magnets.And when the electrical impulse is off the same magnets also accelerated and increase the resulting fall back impulse - which provides the spark.Unless you have a suitable laser cutter or simlar cutting tech available somehow it will be hard to modify the metal plates of the stator.But if you could...Imagine you could add magnet inside the plates that are inside a coil.The same pre-loading would happen.Does not really help in terms of adding outpur as our rectifier would suffer badly here.It does give ideas though...Shielding works fine for the magnets, same for field shaping.Electromagnets use the same techniques...So why not use some leftlever transformer cores to add more "shortcuts" for the coils?Strips of transformer core sheets added either side of the coils increase their field strenght and result in better output!Three packs either side of the stator pack are usually no problem.Now take your leftovers and do a standard mod.Compare the max output on the same windmill with what you get from my mod(s).The only real magic I used here is that I actually bothered to combine multiple and already used methods to drastically increase the available output of an otherwise utterly useless generator mod ;)Warnings:If you take the above mods serious and to the their extreme than it is imperative to make sure you have safety measures in place!Assume the lowest rating for the magnet wire and if in doubt stick with a max output voltage of 800V.These mods are potentially lethal if you don't follow what is common sense to everyone dealing with high voltages for a living!Most people will start without any gearing or belts and use the wind directly.Even here it is easy to get far higher RPM than what the thing ever did under your ceiling.Without some fixes you will need transformers to reduce the output voltage accordingly.Only other option is to limit the max speed to what your DC-DC converter can handle.Making mistakes with mangets can cost you a lot of time and work, make sure to mark their poles somehow to prevent putting them in wrong.If in doubt then double check!Always keep in mind what the magnet wires and your connections can handle!You don't want any arcs or overheating.Some added electronics to monitor wind speed, rpm's, load and temperature of the coils can turn out vital once you upscale.Before letting your new generator do its thing make sure you tested all to the max!Use a drill or so to speed it up and check the limit regulation for the converters.Measure the actual volts and amps going through your coil sets at assumed max speed and max load.Monitor the coil temp while doing so to ensure nothing is out of limit!You are kidding me here right?A scrap ceiling fan shall provide more output as a wind generator than what was used to spin it as a fan?And of course I need not one but two 3-phse transformers...Pretty clear it is all a fake because nobody could replicate any of it unless limited to what the converters can handle...Didn't I say to think outside normal restraints already?A single phase transformer uses two coils in the most basic configuration.For example one side for 240V and te other for 12V.But some of them are more efficient than other ;)A 3-phase transformer uses 6 coils, two for each phase.And there are plenty of standrad transformer cores out there that would allow us to use this configuration.The worst being the MOT, or microwave oven transformer.Very lossy for a reason but good as an example as these have three core stems ;)Now that you see that you will that a lot more transformers actually allow you to replace the two coils with 6 ;)Ok, but why not use a rectifier first and not use a transformer or two at all?The resulting output voltage will without a gear REDUCTION be much higher than what a cheap DC-DC converter can handle.And at such speeds the effiency would be very bad too.You would need huge capacitors of good quality to deal with the now more impulse like output.And considering the primary side of the transformer does not require anything thicker than the wire on the coils of the fan...Not hard at all to find some suitable tansformers to salvage - or to use some nice ring transformers ;)No kidding around, just facts and possible options you might want to explore.Does that now mean I get free energy?Sure, if you mean you get the free nergy from the energy of the wind at no cost.No if you think a ceiling fan could ever power your house.Internal resistance, size and wire/connection properties set our limits.Not to mention that they are designed to be dirt cheap.If you are in a windy region and assume a realistic 300W minimum output from a 100W fan then adding more stage multiplies this.These fancy upright windmills are not just powerful but also would allow to use one modded fan either end.If big enough and with enough wind force throughout the year you could just add a second or third stage to ech end.With 3 on both ends the resulting output would then be suddenly 1.8kW per windmill....And all from scrap parts with only the costs for the magnets...No wind? Then use water....None of it? Get some greyhounds and build a big hamster wheel :)You get the general idea I hope...

Topic by Downunder35m 2 months ago  |  last reply 2 months ago


Twin-blade ceiling fan (Steampunk-esque)

Hi, I tried posting this already but then couldn't find it so I hope I am not posting twice... I fell in love with this ceiling fan (http://www.wayfair.com/Minka-Aire-Twin-Gyro-6-Blade-Turbofan-F502-BCW-MKA1488.html) which I can't attach properly to show the image because the uploader doesn't work (either of them) on my computer. Problem is that the fan is over $800! I'd like to combine a bunch of pieces and make something like this out of old desk fans and a nice light fixture (or something I can turn into a nice light fixture) to both save money and spare our landfill.  Thing is, although I get lamps and they are very easy, once you add moving parts I am scared sh!tle$$!   I figure there has to be someone out there who knows if it is even possible to recreate this at home. Thanks Joelle

Topic by Cleo420 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


how do I level a ceiling fan?

OK, I've played with those @%!%^ weights till I'm dizzzy - how do I level this dumb fan??

Question by NanaMomsers 8 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Is ceiling fan blade and helicopter blade same in design or not what is the difference between them in their design?

Can i use fan blade as light weight helicopter blade or there is a difference in their design

Question by MuhammadK19 2 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


Pull chain for light on ceiling fan broke on off position.?

 The light kit is hard wired to the fan.  It is a two wire light and the there are no connections to separate, the wire is directly wired to the fan.   usually there are wire nut connectors which are simple to remove and replace with new switch.  This fan has no such connectors.  one wire is soldered directley to fan motor and the other end is solder to the light assembly.  Is there any way to repair this , or at least to turn the light on.  The wires fit extremely tightly into the the little light kit, there is no room whatever to work with .  any suggestions?

Question by yelgab 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


What can i do with non working electromagnet ceiling fans?

I've got a lot electromagnetic ceiling fans that don't work any more of which i don't what's the difference, if anybody can teach me of how will convert it to anything instead of throewing it

Question by jovenhatsjr 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Replacing an old bathroom fan

This is an idea someone may be able to use, but it does not quite rise to what I would want to do as an Instructable. A widow friend has two bathrooms, each with a very dated bathroom fan in need of replacement. I was able to mount the works (fan motor, fan blade, and mounting plate) for the new fan onto the old mounting plate after modifying the old plate. This saved me hours of work in a very hot confined attic when time and tools available to me were quite limited. Had I torn out the carcass for the old fan and tried to put the new fan carcass in its place, I would have needed to fashion a wooden framework for mounting the carcass that would fit just right between the ceiling joists, all so the fan would be properly centered above the existing hole in the ceiling.  The mounting plate for the new works was just a bit smaller than that for the old works. The height and diameter of the new fan cage were very close to the dimensions of the old fan cage. I began by using a cutting wheel on an angle head grinder to cut through the old mounting plate around the circumference of the old fan cage. Then I positioned the old mounting plate over the new works and its mounting plate. The glass dish that would cover the light bulbs fastens to a shaft that screws onto a threaded stud centered between the corners of the new mounting plate. I sighted across the corners of the mounting plates so the threaded stud was centered. I clamped the two mounting plates together and drilled four holes for 10-32 screws 1/2 inch long and secured them with nuts and lockwashers. (I did need to cut out part of the new mounting plate so the fitting for the two electrical outlets [fan and light] were accessible to plug in both the light and fan cords.) Had the glass dish mounted to the works differently, I would have used measurements from at least two sides to the center of the fan's shaft to position the new mounting plate on the old. Once the two mounting plates were held together with four screws it was a simple matter to put the works into the old carcass and plug in both the fan and the light to their respective receptacles. There was no question the works would fit because they were attached to the old mounting plate that had been taken from the old carcass. The round opening in the ceiling drywall bordered on being too large to be covered by the escutcheon for the new cover/light fixture. I added some drywall spackling around the edges to close any imperfections and gaps. For me this was an idea that worked and saved me a lot of time.  

Topic by Phil B 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


how to put into use some damage electromagnetic fan? Answered

I have a lot of ceiling fans that doesn't work anymore and i would like to convert it into something useful rather than giving it to recycle depots can anyone show what i can do about it.

Question by jovenhatsjr 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Reducing speed / RPM of pedestal fan

I have a 400 mm pedestal fan rated for 230V 50Hz AC, 120W with minimum 2200 RPM which uses motor coils winding for speed regulation. Its speed and noise is very much even at lowest setting. I want to reduce its speed even further. I am thinking of three options - one - changing the OEM fitted 3.00 micro-farad 440V capacitor with 1.5 or 2.0 micro-farad 440V capacitor, second - using a capacitance based speed regulator (used with ceiling fans) and the third - using a resistance based speed regulator (least preferred option though). Please tell which option will work fine without doing any harm to motor coil? Any other options are highly welcome.

Question by sharmavk83 10 months ago


(newsletter) LED Ceiling Fan, Hot-Wire Nunchuks, Pulled Pork...

Sign-up for this newsletter: Welcome back! We still have three fantastic contests running!Art of Sound Contest - Win an incredible custom hi-fi tower set with subwoofer, monster speakers, and more!! Last chance to enter: this Sunday, July 26!Show off your creative cardboard skills in the Gorilla Glue Cardboard Contest and win a huge package of Gorilla Glue supplies and gear!Cook up something tasty for the Low & Slow BBQ Contest and win a Weber Smokey Mountain Cooker, and autographed copies of the new Low & Slow BBQ book! Help choose the winners by voting for your favorites in these contests: Pocket-Sized Contest - Help decide who wins a custom laser-etched Leatherman! Get in the Garden Contest - Help decide who wins a computer-controlled indoor composting machine from NatureMill! Make Pocket Drunken Robots An Improved Raised Bed Garden Make a Steampunk Pen Knife Ceiling Fan LED Display Enter your audio project now! Closes this Sunday! Maker Tin PVC Fruit Picker 8-Track Walkman Make Pulled Pork Submit a cardboard creation and win a prize pack from Gorilla Glue! Cook up something tasty! Run Ethernet and Phone on Cat-5 Cable Wearable Sound-to-Light Display Pocket Screwdriver Pocket Sized Soldering Kit Help decide who wins the Leatherman! Help decide who wins the composter! Anti-Boredom Pocket Kit Make a Book Headboard! Build an Attractive Upside Down Planter Hot-Wire Foam Cutting Nunchucks Sign-up for this newsletter:

Topic by fungus amungus 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


How detect the speed changes of fan using a controller ic?

I have a ceiling fan manual regulator, the voltage output that i got when different speed is 80v,120v,180v,200v respectively in my project i want to detect the fan speed changes. that means if fan is running in 1st speed then user turn into second speed it should be detect(by using in Arduino) .how can detect this?I tried to use a current sensor(ACS712) at output of a regulator then detect the current for different speed..but the variation still small cannot be detectable.

Topic by wounder 6 days ago  |  last reply 1 day ago


"Hydronic" A/C in an enclosed overhead space condensing and weeping ruining the ceiling tiles.

In an historic building, a remodel installing a chill water A/C air handler into a ceiling space now completely enclosed, is experiencing severe condensation and weeping onto the drop ceiling tiles.  I suspect a building code violation; "non vented installation". I am guessing a small powered fan/blower, cycling the air in the over head enclosed space with the "air-conditioned" environment. I am just guessing...  I would be honored to receive expert advice. Thank you, Calvin Rodriguez 858-382-9692

Question by watchmkr1 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Wiring up a bathroom exhaust fan-how to?

so I cut a nice round hole in the ceiling of my bathroom. physically installed the fan. was going to wire into the light so that the light switch would turn on the light and fan in one. the exhaust fan has a plug- 2 prongs (i'm in australia). the wiring to the light switch is only 2 wires. the light wire was exposed /available half way between the light socket and the switch. so thought that would be a good place to cut the wires (mains power off and fuses removed) thought at first I would wire the fan in serial and that didn't work. tried parallel and htat didn't work. I was going to wire a "power socket" on  to the cable.  the fan has a cable coming out of it with a plug . inside the power socketty thing there places to out the wires. and then turn a screw to keep them in place (ooooohhhh , the technology talk is a flowing). so black has one socket thing to place wires in and red has 2 socket things to put wires in. so how (and please use a diagram if it makes it easier for me) do  I wire the bastard in to work??? I've tried every combination - except using red wires in to both red wires places with turn screws in the socket thing.

Question by altomic 8 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago



Years Back in the 80's a friend had a stereo from "Fingerhut" that had spinning l.e.d fans that reacted to the music? Answered

The stereo had two fan like l.e.d. arrays of about 10 each in different colors red green yellow that were on fan like structures inside each of the 12" woofers on his home stereo that he got from "Fingerhut" the l.e.d.s would pulse with the music one side of a blade to the bass and the other with the highs usually ending up making a red & green with yellow pulsating orb inside each speaker that was seen through the black speaker cloth, I have never seen anything like this before or after anywhere but it was a very nice display and could be made with wheels or ceiling fans or any fan I bet, I wish I would have taken electronics in high school instead of CAD but the cad system was cutting edge in 86 and our school had access to them...the only thing I have seen like this is the floating message thingys that use a back and forth l.e.d.s waving in the air. I know if someone builds it it would sell good even for the automotive speaker markets...this was cheap chines junk it could not have cost much to build it but it did look great!!!! I have seen the automotive led wheels that can display pictures and such but this is way simpler than that and the power source and electronics were not spinning withe the leds... trust me build it and you will spend hours watching them while listening to music almost as good as what music videos used to be :) Anybody Seen or Know where they can be bought or can build them? Fast Ed88

Question by FastEd88 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


How can I heat my unheated basement using the existing hotwater pipes but without altering the hot water system? Answered

My basement is freezing as it doesn't have a radiator. Its does however, have two 3m hot water pipes from the central heating system above running accross the ceiling. How can I use the heat from these without altering the hot water system? I was considering encasing them in ducting and using a 12v fan to blow cool air in one end and warm air out of the other. Thoughts? Would painting them with a specific paint help? I need ideas. I'm FREEZING! :D

Question by Tassle 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


would this heater in my sheds future false ceiling be a good idea?

I've come up with an idea for a heater in my sheds future false ceiling. Its basically a wooden box with an unmodified hairdryer attached and four PC fans blowing the warm air down each of the 4 clothes dryer hoses to vents roughly at floor level. I've seen one ibble where the heating element and motor were removed and used but don't fancy that idea too much. The shed is brick with a reinforced concrete roof and gets extremly cold in winter. The false ceiling will be around 10 inches from the concrete to allow for the stone 9inch mantle above the window and door and gas pipe. The gas pipe is capped and don't want a boiller in a confined work space . Here is a plan of the heater (excuse the odd looking hairdryer) Forgot to mention the widhth and length are f 7ft x 6ft and the height is 7ft.

Question by cyberraxx 2 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


Neat Little Lamp

Check out this neat little lamp I found at Lowes. It's got pencil and paper holding "hands", LED bulb "head", and fully adjustable joints. Impulse buys FTW! I was supposed to be looking for a ceiling fan :P An Instructable on how to make one of these would be cool.

Topic by Spl1nt3rC3ll 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


How do I build a roof over my deck? Answered

I would like it to be up to code, able to withstand harsh winds and heavy snow, and still look good on the house. I also thought it would be nice to have a ceiling fan underneath possibly?

Question by falks79 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


how to keep my house cool? Is there a way i can make a simple cooler that circulates water to keep a particular room co?

I stay in seattle area, and it's around 90 - 100 F nowadays, We do not have an AC in house. We have a 2 storied house with bedrooms on the 2nd floor. Lots of windows, But the problem is that there is no wind blowing, thus the house inside is very hot even with the table fans and ceiling fans running. Any tips of keeping the house cold? Any way to build something with that uses water as a cooling agent?

Question by rahulkijai 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


holiday inflatable - giant floating (indoor) balloon

 We have a Gemmy inflatable at work (a giant Homer Simpson -- about 8 feet tall) and we were wondering if we could somehow fill it with helium and float it on the ceiling. We're concerned that it's too permeable (when the fan is not going, it deflates FAST).  One idea was to coat the inside with polyurethane (turning the fan on to blow it throughout the balloon) but that seems like it wouldn't work very well (too patchy), and could make it too heavy. Another option would be to take a bunch of balloons, insert them into the Homer, and then inflate the smaller balloons (and tie them off). Any other thoughts or suggestions?

Topic by jeffreality 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


How to cool a really hot CPU in a cheap/inexpensive and efficient way?

Since summer has started, now my CPU temperature goes very high and the computer shuts down. The normal CPU temperature is above 75 Degrees. I do not have AC at home. Is there a way to cool the cpu with home made things or something easily available and cheap / inexpensive? The PC lay flat with it's cover open, and the ceiling fan at full speed. I do not run hot but the poor cpu does at above 75 degrees still. What can I do about it?

Question by rseni 10 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Compare the older posts of Magnet generators "instructable-type" to the current posts - Is this way still competitive?

I love you guys - keep it up!  I am the Hippie often referred to, according to my little brother, Dirt. (I'm older than Dirt...) Over a year ago I studied this fellow while recovering from being run down on my bike by a hit and run car doing 65MPH. The thing that keeps coming back to me is that I always see a multitude of ceiling fans for practically free. Also he addresses the over speed topic very well too. HTTP://www.youtube.com/user/muddymuddymuddmann?feature=watch

Question by miscexpert 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Residential wiring problem. Power in both positive and negative outlet. Answered

Helping Pops out on this one... He's got a spare room with a small adjoining bathroom. The wiring breakdown on the fusebox indicates that these two rooms are wired as part of the same circuit on the main breaker. In the two rooms there are: 2 outlets, 1 GFI outlet, and 4 switches controlling 2 lights and 1 bathroom ceiling fan. In the last few months this room has been experiences some abnormalities in power: flickering lights, occasional outage, GFI tripped. The outages usually lasted less than an hour and would occur with or without any load and any time. GFI trips sometimes, but other lights will work on the circuit when it's just the GFI. Recently all power to this room has stopped. The main breaker never trips. With everything unplugged (including the ceiling fan) I checked the outlets in the room. Screwdriver voltage tester was used. The probe registers a 'charge' in the outlet and 'no power' on the return. Normal. However when any load (light, clock, tv) is applied all outlets instantly register a charge in both the positive and the return. Not normal. The breaker doesn't trip, resetting breaker or GFI doesn't work, and the positive and negative terminals of the outlets are both registering as charged. House is 10 years old with no previous wiring issues, in Canada. Can anyone tell me what's wrong? edit: January 24, 2011 Problem has been located and fixed. Closer inspection of the breaker panel revealed that the neutral was loose, and had started to melt the casing of the wire. The wire was clipped and spliced, and now things are back to normal. Thanks for everyone's input, best answer awarded!

Question by mikeasaurus 8 years ago  |  last reply 3 days ago


Bathroom Occupied Transmitter

Newbie here... greetings! I work in office building with about 20 guys, most heavy coffee drinkers... we have one-holer restroom which is located about 100 feet and around a corner from the area where the majority of the guys work. Needless to say 8 out of 10 times you make the journey to go to use the restroom, someone is in there with the door locked... leaving you constantly defeated and having to go badly.. I want to create a light or a signal viewable in our common room that would indicate when that bathroom is in use. There is one light switch in the bathroom which operates the overhead light and the fan... and the fan is extremely loud so we always turn the light off when exiting the bathroom.  So my thought is to add some sort of transmitter to the switch that when turned on would send a signal to a receiver down the hall in the common room and that receiver would turn on a small light somewhere in the room. The guy next to me has a nice lava lamp and has volunteered it's services as the bathroom indicator. I'm hoping to find a transmitter or replacement switch/transmitter combo that can be wired into the existing single switch box (no batteries to change). This is what I need help locating.  It would need to perform it's current duties.. turning on the light and fan, as well as send the "on" signal and "off" signal to the receiver 100 feet away.  I think the other solution would be to run a wire thru the ceiling from the switch, but was hoping to avoid that. Thanks in advance for your help!

Topic by treetop1500 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


CFL

Who else uses CFL ( Compact fluorecent Lightbulb) I my self replaced all my rooms light with them, so 4 bulbs in total. They sell them at Sams club, 8 CFL units that replace 60 watt bulbs for about $10. Instead of using 60 watts they only use 13, also they do not get as hot making your room cooler in the wee hours of the morning. Im not sure if they sell them for the smaller bulbs like the skinny ones ceiling fan, because thats the kind of bulbs we have on our wall. I decided not to use that light for now. Most of all the light bulbs in our house are fluorecent, except the bathrooms, a few lights we use rarely and the 3 different intensity bulbs. Who else uses CFL and if you don't, do you want to switch?

Topic by acer73 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


Stop back flow bringing smoke to the rest of the house through the AC ducts? Answered

One room in the house we smoke, but when a window is opened all the smoke is sucked through the ac ducts to the main intake which is in a hallway right outside all the bedrooms. I believe this is because the room is generally ~10 degrees warmer than the main part of the house which the hallway is off of because it is a large, open area which is less insulated because of a vaulted ceiling and many large windows. I am looking for a way to seal the room off from the rest of the house without disabling the functionality of the AC/Heater. I've found this HVAC Damper which I think could work, but it's a bit pricey, and it's supposed to be hooked up to a controller unit, so I don't know if there's a way to hook it up to either the fan or thermostat so it just opens when the AC/Heater/Fan is on, and the closes after. I had also been thinking about building a box with a large, one-way valve, but the only design I can think of is a bit beyond my fabrication abilities. Any help, hints, or suggestions would be appreciated, thanks.

Question by siamonsez 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Bunk Beds Dangerous for Kids, Hopefully Safe for Interns

A new report shows that bunk beds may be pretty dangerous things that can lead to broken toes, bloody noses, ceiling fan entanglement (!), falls, strangulation and more fun things. Thinking back on my own experience growing up on the top bunk as a kid and in school dorms, I think I can claim about three of those injuries. But it was fun and sometimes we combined the injuries like the time I pushed a kid off the top of a bunk (an accident, I swear) and as he was falling off he chucked a plastic squirt gun and nailed me in the forehead making me bleed all over the place.He landed on a cushion and I proudly went to the hospital. Good times.Well, here at Instructables HQ we have our own bunkbeds for interns and visitors and so far there have been no accidents. But, as this study from Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio seems to say, it's only a matter of time before we add to the 36,000 reported injuries a year. Link

Topic by fungus amungus 10 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Grid Tie and Induction Motors

Yes, I know it's nearly 3am on the east coast... but and idea struck me. So the idea is to feed small amounts of mechanical power into the power grid. Not necessarily run the meter backwards, but supplement power consumption.I've researched grid tie inverters - which are very expensive. For those wondering, a grid tie inverter is feeds mains power back into the grid by syncing phase angle and phase (no dead shorts :) ) and applying slightly higher voltage. They are very efficient and really not within a college student experiment budget :pSo I was thinking... Rather than go from mechanical to DC to AC to grid - go from mechanical to AC to grid VIA an induction motor. As a proof of concept, use a DC motor + battery to turn an induction motor. Plugged into the grid, in theory, should apply current. Oh, but the phase you say? How do you prevent a dead short?"I've thought of this -- before applying mechanical power - have the grid bring the induction motor up to speed. Then try to turn faster (apply a torque) with the DC motor, for example. In theory, the amount of extra power put into the grid will be related to the slip angle of the motor - which will also control the speed of the input (so you can't go over speed by too much).Keep in mind that this whole battery business is just a proof of concept sort of thing - I'm not talking perpetual motion or any hohaa craziness. In the end, the final mechanical input will be around 200 watts. I expect this to be very low efficiency (likely 50%ish), 100W isn't an answer to the energy issues - but it's an experiment. It's also not going to come even close to driving the meter backwards, but it should run (as supplement) my laptop + two to three 13w CFL's :DI think the theory is feasible -- the inspiration comes from flywheel driven UPS systems. An induction motor is driven while mains power is on to keep a flywheel in motion. When the power goes out, the FW drives the motor and feeds to local grid.I'm thinking of using a "low" rpm induction motor.... If I recall, ceiling fans are 16 pole? So that's 60Hz2*2/16=450rpm... Add ceiling fan motor to the list of things to hunt for :) Looking at the one above my head, it looks like it even has a nice bolt pattern for some sort of pulley shenanigans :DCan someone either throw some ice water on me and slap me for being an idiot -- or let me know if I've found a boat to Valhalla.Oh, and my apologies for dancing around the "mechanical input" details.... There's a reason for this, I promise :) In any case, insight and information is appreciated :)

Topic by trebuchet03 11 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Residential 3-way switch problem with leaking voltage?

I noticed a slight glow in the light when it was switched off. LED bulbs in a ceiling fan/light fixture. House built in 1905, wired whenever? using all-fabric insulation type wiring but not knob and tube .  Removed the load from sw 2 and tested travel wire voltages and got 95 v on one and 25 v on the other. Flip sw 1 and the voltages trade wires along with the switch position change.  The switches tested OK but replaced both anyway and got duplicate readings when repeating tests. Isolated the travel wires and got no continuity  (infinite resistance) using all scales of an analog meter as well as a Fluke digital multi-meter.. We checked for voltage feedback from another circuit and even used an extension cord to a different circuit in order to use a different ground wire. With the load connected, the travel wire being used shows 120 v but we still get 25 v on the other wire. I discovered this because when I bought the house only sw 2 worked the light, and one travel wire was disconnected at sw 1 and taped  off.. I have not opened the ceiling box at the fixture because the problem exists when the wire to it is disconnected.The previous owner said he didn't remember what sw 1 went to because it hadn't worked for many years.   So we eliminated worn insulation or nail into the cable because either one  would cause a resistance reading below infinity. All we can think of is a legacy doorbell. Neither of us remembers working one, but I know some used 120 volts and a relay.  People have told me that relay contacts can cause this problem when they get worn. Does anyone have any ideas? I'm retired on a fixed income and tearing walls open is an absolute last resort.  Thank you in advance for any advice I can get!

Question by gerryk8 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Question on using a Peltier/TEC device for air temperature control - Help please.

I want to have some control over the temperature inside the Orchidium I'm designing and I thought it might be cool :) to use a Peltier Device (device aka module) (Peltier aka TEC or Thermoelectric Cooler). I find I need a lot of help! (Please!) Alright, this isn't a completed Instructable, it's a plea for help, and maybe if the subjects lie in some of your fields of knowledge then we can all enjoy and learn from it. So, the Orchidium I'm designing is an acrylic case 24"W x 18"D x 30"High. It's to grow species orchids indoors in a microclimate, with LED grow lights, proper humidity, air movement and temperature control. (Of course, other critters would like the case, too: poison dart frogs, newts, carniverous plants, etc.. But I'm going to call it the Orchidium.) I've got it all pretty well planned out so that it can be built for a very reasonable price (yes, including the LEDs) and still be aesthetically pleasing and real purdy, too. All planned out EXCEPT FOR THE TEMPERATURE CONTROL. I was looking for some way to cool my case and I stumbled across Peltier devices in eBay. They are CHEAP, costing about $5 or more, depending on the Wattage, etc. The eBay sellers intimated that all you have to do is plug them in and the device gets ice cold. Later, with diligent web-study I learned that actually ONE SIDE of the peltier gets cold, while the other side gets hot. Also, you MUST attach a heat sink and fan to both (?) sides of the peltier. Also, that these devices are not ready to be plugged in; you must attach a DC power supply to them. Oh, another trick that these miraculous devices do is reverse their hot & cold sides when you reverse the polarity of their juice. Ideally, I would like a Peltier device with heatsinks, fans, a thermostat and a DC wall transformer attached... the Peltier/heatsinks/fans would measure about 2" x 2" x 6" and would be mounted in the sidewall of the Orchidium. When the temperature is 65-85F degrees the orchids are happy and the device is Off. But when the thermostat senses the internal temp going over 85F it turns on the Peltier, cold side inside, and so the inside of the case doesn't go up to 90-95F like mine does now; it cools the case a little. Conversely, for someone with chilly orchids or sneezing newts the thermostat would switch the Peltier to hot-side-in to heat the Orchidium a bit. The retail cost for us to buy a Peltier device, 2 heatsinks w/fans and a DC transformer is cheap... roughly $30. The thermostat might be cheap, but I don't know enough about what's needed. If it's too expensive then the Orchidium can do without it. I was hoping I could find an off-the-shelf Orchidium cooler/heater. No such luck. These miraculous Peltier devices are still practically undiscovered -- relatively speaking. People want to use them to cool their computer chips but are hampered by condensation; my orchids welcome condensation. Pathetically, it seems the most common use for Peltiers now is to cool/heat the little boxes on your car seat... they plug into your cigarette lighter and keep your 6-pack cold. Come on! You folks at Instructables can surely help me figure out how to best make an Orchidium cooler with this barely-discovered and poorly-utilized device. I started out a few weeks ago writing to many of the Peltier manufacturers around the world in hopes they might help me in choosing which of their modules I might purchase for my Orchidium. None of them was any help. They wanted to know how many million Orchidiums I planned per year. They told me my basic plan was hopeless or inefficient cost-wise. A Swedish company wanted $800. An American company wanted $500. Some other company wanted $5,000 to $8,000. I wrote back and said I could get a Peltier on eBay for five bucks. The Swedes snottily claimed that their Peltiers were very high quality. No. No way is any svensker Peltier $795 better than ANY other Peltier in the known universe. They both get cold and grow ice crystals on one side. I just need to cool the case A LITTLE BIT, like from 90 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. I am not trying to make a refrigerator or freezer. The case (Orchidium) is large, at about 7.5 cubic feet, and there is practically no insulation. Acrylic provides a little insulation, that's all. The temp of the interior of the case is derived from the ambient room temperature of your house... and the lights... which is why I designed it with LEDs. There is a constantly-operating muffin fan inside the case to provide air movement for the plants, but it does not provide any evaporative cooling since it's a closed case. So, first off what size Peltier do you recommend... do you think a 40 Watt would be enough, or what? Next, the placement. I envision the Peltier device mounted vertically through a hole in the side of the case. It might be a plan to mount it in the ceiling, but remember that the LEDs take up most of the ceiling. Next, the heatsinks. I confess I'm not totally clear on this, but I "think" that 2 heatsinks-with-fans may be needed, with one sticking out the outside and the other inside the case. I went ahead and got 2 heatsink/fans from Newegg for supercheap ($1 after rebate), but they aren't really what I want. They're actually shaped to fit some AMD chip. What I think I need is a copper heatsink with a flat bottom a little bigger than the Peltier, and fins... and a heatsink fan attached... and some way to attach it to the Peltier, and through the case to the other heatsink. See? Simple... well it should be but I can find nothing. Next, the power supply. I know it has to be DC, but I don't know which brick to get. I did find a bunch of DC or AC Wall Transformers for sale at alltronics... around $10 or so. All that stuff would be enough... at least to test the cooling power. But if we want to go whole hog then the icing on the cake would be thermostatic control of the Peltier. Well, I throw that out in case one of you is sharp in that field.

Topic by Knuten 11 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


How do I install a new electrical outlet? Answered

I need guidance on how to install a new electrical outlet to an existing wall.  My bathroom only has one electrical outlet, and it's located on the vanity light over the sinks (see photo close-up of light outlet on outdated fixture with rad vintage pastel ikat wallpaper).  More info:  Usually this should be pretty easy, since there should be an outlet on the other side of the wall that you can just tap in to; but there's no outlets on the other side of any of these walls (see wall descriptions below).  There are electrical wires running through these walls though, powering lighting and heating.  So, can I just cut a hole in the wall, reach my hand in, grab a random wire, cut it, splice in wiring to a new outlet, and magically everything works?  Probably not that simple.  I can grasp the basics involved in this, but I'm not 100% certain on how to proceed with my situation since I don't think I need to deal with feeding up new separating wiring from the basement but I also just can't easily tap into an adjacent existing outlet.    Floor plan: There's 2 switches at the bathroom entrance: one for the lights, one for the bathroom fan. The light switch controls 2 light fixtures: the one overhead light (it's a light/fan combo) as well as the lighting above the sink.  See scan image for rough sketch of current electrical floor plan. Wall descriptions based on sketch: Left wall: interior wall; on other side of the wall is an electric baseboard heater; door to hallway Bottom wall: exterior wall; window Right wall: interior wall; adjacent room is unfinished "attic" area above garage with sloped ceiling* Top wall: interior wall; adjacent stairwell; wall-mounted light fixture with outlet; small under-cabinet baseboard heating vent thing I would like to know if/how I can tap into the electricity of that sink light fixture to be able to relocate the electrical outlet lower, closer to the sink counter, and possibly off to the side (so, not central to the counter as it currently is).  See scan image for rough sketch of proposed electrical floor plan (ignore birds, I was using scrap paper).  I realize if I were to relocate it off to the side, I'd need to drill through studs and make more more holes in the wall, but that's fine, as I was thinking of creating storage space between the studs anyway. I'm planning on replacing the current sink light fixture with either a) another wall fixture in the same location, b) 2 separate wall fixtures, one above each sink, or c) 3 separate wall sconces, a leftmost one, a center, and a rightmost one.  I haven't decided on what will look and function the best.   I'm sure there was a much more succinct way of asking this question and describing my situation, but I am clueless about electricity and wiring and whatnot.  Despite my inexperience and ignorance I still feel like this is a task I'm capable of, but I'd like to seek the guidance of you wonderful Instructables' folks on how to do this.  I'd like to know where you think the outlet(s) should go based on the information I provided, and then how I get the power to that outlet without electrocuting myself and frying the house.   * I first was going to say that this attic ceiling outlet is the nearest thing to an adjacent outlet, but I just remembered there's an outlet at the top of the stairs, adjacent to the attic (meaning, not on the other side of a bathroom wall).  The attic ceiling outlet is controlled by a light switch inside attic entrance anyway, and this is an insulated roof wall too. 

Question by Pompom 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Need help about my new project. (help about info, suggestions, and tips)

I'm new here and I need some help regarding my project. I am aiming for building our house an emergency lighting system. I like electronic stuff, I do all electrical repairs and mod to our house, it's my hobby. But I didn't take electronics so I am a bit lacking with basic knowledge. I am planning of doing this by buying bright LEDs wire them in parallel so when the time comes, typhoon or something and the light goes out, we can have a bright well lit house, seeing our stuff will be enough although no electric fans and all, we just can't keep on buying candles which are very dangerous and cause fires. Things I am aiming for: LED's wired in parallel circuit On and off switch detachable battery plug (so we can remove and replace batteries) a 30,000mah portable power bank as a power source or bigger Rechargeable (30,000mah power bank used to charge my smartphone or I can buy bigger capacity batteries from our electronic store) Basic circuitry and system Here's where I need help, i don't know what LED I need to buy, I just want the small once that lasts long though depending on the battery capacity. I don't know their specs, I dont know which is best for this project, Our main area where I need to set this thing up is our sala. Our sala isn't very big, probably just 5 meters square I will hook the LEDs in a parallel circuit, stick them to the ceiling spanning all four sides of our sala. if I use the 30,000 mah power bank for cellphones as their power supply, how long will it lasts? what type of LED will be bright enough and consume low power for them to light for long hours? Does buying bigger battery means easy replacement? will it lasts longer? If I buy the large battery from the store, I need to recharge it, how can I build a charger, I saw they were just selling battery I don't know how I can recharge the things. Thanks guys!

Topic by Toyanster 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago